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Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > AikiWeb AikiBlogs > Seeking Zanshin: Blood, Sweat, Tears & Aikikai

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Seeking Zanshin: Blood, Sweat, Tears & Aikikai Blog Tools Rating: Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 02-24-2005 10:53 PM
jducusin
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One small gal + a dojo full of big guys = tons o' fun
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 272 (Private: 12)
Comments: 195
Views: 269,609

In General Hating My Own Weakness Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #164 New 01-20-2005 09:59 PM
After Jo practice, we started things off with some Hanmi Handachi waza: Shomenuchi Shihonage. Some of the finer points I had to add were: not sweeping outward to catch uke's hand (that's for yokomenuchi) but just raising your hands up to do so, and moving more at a 45 degree angle (not 90 degrees/perpendicular) from uke to avoid being within his punching range.

We also spent a great deal of time on Tsuki Ikkyo and once again, it became readily apparent (as it usually does) that as things stand right now, I could never perform this technique on someone bigger and stronger. Essentially, were someone to really lock their arm out strongly, I would have to resort to a Nikkyo-like pin to move them. Which is fine. Whereas I used to be frustrated at not being able to do certain techniques exactly the way most of the guys do, I've learned to accept the fact that I will simply have to adapt a great many of them so that they actually work for me.

I've been working on improving my grip so as to make such things as this (and Sankyo, for example) a lot more effective. I've also noticed that with some uke's in class I have had a tendency to hold back a fair amount (until Sensei notices and tells me to do something with more force)--- such that if I were to simply torque their limbs just a bit more, I'd have the control over them that is necessary. Why is this? Am I so afraid of hurting someone else? I'm certainly not all that fearful of hurting myself (case in point, just dislocated my thumb tonight taking ukemi for Sempai Jeremy).

I suppose it shouldn't come as such a big surprise, but I can't believe I haven't realized up until now that as a whole it seems that because of my physical make-up, I am forced to work a great deal harder than a lot of my larger classmates. They have strength to fall back on in a real-life combat situation, but I have no such saving grace. (Not that it's necessarily a good thing, but) they can get away with bad technique through muscling it. Not me. Nope. So until that one shining day, when --- or rather, if --- I ever actually get good at this shit, well...I'm screwed. :-P
Views: 323 | Comments: 2


RSS Feed 2 Responses to "Hating My Own Weakness"
#2 02-08-2005 07:43 PM
jducusin Says:
Hi Rick! Long time, no see. Thanks for the advice and the vote of confidence. I'll definitely try to keep that in mind...I know I have a tendency to really pick apart technique to the point of not just letting it do it's thing. :-) -Jamie
Quote:
Rick Warne wrote:
Hi Jamie. You'll get it. You have the desire and committment. Let the technique work . Remember to relax, keep weight underside and extend ki throughout the application of the technique. Perform with confidence. As Henry Ford once said " Whether you think you can or can't you are right. Sorry if I'm preaching. You are a great student with a gifted sensei. I found that when I relax more and keep ki extending it is very easy to throw or immobilize someone the size of Kelly or Lazlo. Take care. All the best in your training. Rick W NKKA
#1 01-25-2005 04:19 PM
Rick Warne Says:
Hi Jamie. You'll get it. You have the desire and committment. Let the technique work . Remember to relax, keep weight underside and extend ki throughout the application of the technique. Perform with confidence. As Henry Ford once said " Whether you think you can or can't you are right. Sorry if I'm preaching. You are a great student with a gifted sensei. I found that when I relax more and keep ki extending it is very easy to throw or immobilize someone the size of Kelly or Lazlo. Take care. All the best in your training. Rick W NKKA
 




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