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Old 05-23-2012, 11:53 AM   #51
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Dan,
I agree with you that external training methods cannot replace internal ones. And I fully respect what you bring to the table and honor your willingness to offer it to others.

I also personally regret not maintaining a "middle way" within the history of my own training regimen. In 2003, as a way of fully delving into the Koryu I train in, I walked away from weight training. Our method is about fully relaxing in order for the elemental forces of (1)gravity, (2) centrifugal, (3) centripetal (4) and friction can be expressed without the body getting in the way.

Leaving my weight training was a big move for me as I began going to gyms holding my father's coat tail in 1961. Through college, I managed gyms. I will be the first to admit that beefing up and body sculpting the beef is the kiss of death if you are looking for flexibility, mobility, long-term health and general mobility in your autumn days on earth.

I am now in my late 50’s and have a return of many old injuries (Biceps tendons, Low back, knee strains, elbow strains, his tightness, etc.). I suspect I would not have these troubles had I kept up with my general resistance training program.

I have often wondered why many of the old koryu folks are happy being gardeners and doing other physical labor professions. I suspect that they found a big secret… Nothing can replace a good ole sweat using light and repetitive resistance. Perhaps I should be kayaking more and working less. 

As this string is about arm bars, Hal’s experience and strategy, I felt, needed to be mentioned. He is in his 70’s and still in the epitome of health and quite active. Below is a photo of Hal in 2010 doing his grip exercises with 80 pounds of weight. His grip is deadly and his speed, well, he developed the “mongoose tactic” which was a military theory of speed and overwhelming force when dealing with hostage taking and counter-insurgency fighting. He is still fast a lightening.

http://www.myspace.com/my/photos/photo/20120092/Album

Here is a photo of his basic positioning and posture when he was teaching the American Sheriff’s Association his system in the 1990’s.

http://www.myspace.com/my/photos/photo/2137512/Album

I know Hal is an “old school” guy in the world of martial arts. But his training was not about the arts as much as it was about training to survive violence and live a long healthy life. He has done this with verve.

Hal’s method was developed from the well-respected and standardized nautilus training method.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_intensity_training

But he took it to the extreme. He did not do slow smooth workouts based on form. He used explosive movements that began at the base of his feet and fully utilized his core strength (in unison) with the area the machine was targeting. Isolation of muscles was for the Clydesdales and Chippendales “Hollywood” body builders.

One final thing about Hal’s work-out… He literally hates air conditioned gyms that were littered with people who were not serious about their training. He demanded a serious sweat and a maximum stress upon his heart rate. He pushed his body as if it were in an anaerobic Judo fight for 28 minutes. Then it was over and we took our final heart rate and BP data. His workout was specifically designed around the movements he needed to accomplish his 21 grip kata during Judo rondori and street encounters. We would then walk it off and wait a while before we sat or ate anything. Breathing and centering exercises were critical at this time.

Me, I am challenged by heredity (a weak and imbalanced physical structure) yet keep on trucking. My last competition was in Tai Chi at the Arnold Classic in 2009. Below, I am getting “lucky” against Timothy Hwang (yes, he’s national class and 30 years younger). You can see my form also pushing hands against his father Dr. Shie Ming Hwang below as well.

http://www.myspace.com/my/photos/photo/20119628/Album

http://www.myspace.com/my/photos/photo/20119629/Album

Cheers

And I do hope you welcome me and Moe to your seminar this August.

Chris
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Old 05-23-2012, 12:36 PM   #52
Alberto_Italiano
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

I like this thread.

I understand what Dan says, weight lifting (what we call body-building, although under that label goes too much stuff) may produce stiffness depending on how you do it and how frequently.

However an athletical preparation is needed in all sports (aikidokas should go running or also do some weight lifting if they enjoy it, or rope skipping which is great to make you jump like a cricket ) - consider 100mt runners, those shoulders many have are not strictly necessary for running, and yet they train legs and arms regularly with weights and although their legs are supposed to be ultrafast, they do squats with incredbly heavy loads that, arguably, should have slowed them down.

If you make weight lifting together with other athletical preparations, more aerobic oriented, they won't really make you physically starchy. Of course it also depends on how much you maximize weight when you lift - you can maximize weight or repetitions, or better a combination of both.

By and large it does not rally matter what you practice, as long as there is an atlethical intensity that produces improved cenesthesis («the combination of organic sensations that comprise an individual's awareness of bodily existence»). Being aware of your body in motion is important, improves your performance and preparedness for all scenarios (well, at least physically) and induces a feeling of physical wellness that is bound to be helpful.

Whatever atlethical preparation you may get, transfers its benefits to whatever sport you practice, inclusive of aikido.

A trivial example: a speed bag. You may hit it while holding in your grip half or 1 whole kilo. After half an hour of that you won't be less fast, on the contrary you will be ultrafast.

Weight lifting, if practiced intensively having another goal in mind, and consequently matched with other preparations, won't stiffen you - but Dan is right insomuch as if you practice weight lifting having in mind only weight lifitng, well then it will slow you down because you're implementing a work out that does not take rapidity into account (arguably, a bodybuilder who goes in competitions does not need that and so does not care).

ps does not need or needs not? English lessons

Last edited by Alberto_Italiano : 05-23-2012 at 12:41 PM.
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Old 05-23-2012, 12:52 PM   #53
Alberto_Italiano
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Chris Parkerson wrote: View Post
I am also of the "kind" variety, even though I run a bodyguard company.
That's what makes you "kind" - you're keenly aware of all the professional implications of dealing with physical force in an unconsiderate manner.
We're on the same line: the guys who imagine fighting pleasurable are only those who have never been there seriously engaged (again as said, psychopaths excluded... those are drawn by their derangend mind and there is nothing you can do, you just have to keep fighting them again at all times).

Once you have been engaged once in your life by a competent fighter, and you quit having brawls with untrained individuals or trained individuals who however have no consistent experience with fighting, all your ideas of how cool fighting around could be vanish instantly.

What makes a responsibile fighter is a memorable beating - taking it, that is

Last edited by Alberto_Italiano : 05-23-2012 at 12:57 PM.
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Old 05-23-2012, 01:31 PM   #54
hughrbeyer
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Chris Parkerson wrote: View Post
Below, I am getting "lucky" against Timothy Hwang (yes, he's national class and 30 years younger). You can see my form also pushing hands against his father Dr. Shie Ming Hwang below as well.

http://www.myspace.com/my/photos/photo/20119628/Album

http://www.myspace.com/my/photos/photo/20119629/Album
I think you need to ask myspace to pretty please give you a URL that works when you aren't logged in.
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Old 05-23-2012, 01:45 PM   #55
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

I fully agree Alberto. I really do not scare too easily. But there have been two guys I have met
that literally gave me the buggers. One was Hal (former Operation 40) and the other was Sonny Puzikas (former Spetznaz). I met Sonny on a project when I hired him as a contractor a couple of years ago. This was before he got famous appearing "Deadliest Warrior" series. I was in awe at his energetics and quiet professionalism. He reminded me of Hal. Then I see him totally out psyche the Green Beret guys on the tactical night shoot. LoL.

Check out his site at http://www.gospelofviolence.com/systema.html
It has a few video clips.

If you want to read 4 pages of nastiness, I leave you with this little story of the 5th time Hal got hit by a vehicle while being a pedestrian. It is truly eye opening as he employed his 2 on 1 grip strategy from the gropund after being bounced by the van and going airborne for 61 feet. With broken ribs, a torn up back, ankles out of socket and a skull crush, his presence of mind and tactics were what he trained and that which saved him from a very bad beating from two bad guys that exited the van. The mind truly is the greatest weapon. An arm-bar saved him. Ha! See pages 272-275 below. If you read any of his primal scream ranting that is near those pages, just understand, he had put up with such attacks for several years. That kind of Jason Bourne experience really takes its toll. I hung out with him in those days and my own cognitive dissonance about it all took some time to dissolve.

thttp://www.scribd.com/Xlibris/d/38661731-Letters-to-Aaron-The-Hal-Luebbert-Story

Both of these guys are very polite and kind. But their understanding of violence is impeccable.

Last edited by Chris Parkerson : 05-23-2012 at 01:50 PM.
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Old 05-23-2012, 02:02 PM   #56
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Hugh Beyer wrote: View Post
I think you need to ask myspace to pretty please give you a URL that works when you aren't logged in.
I am a bit luddite. How do you best post pix? Facebook? My Space? How do you allow access?
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Old 05-23-2012, 02:25 PM   #57
DH
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Alberto Italiano wrote: View Post
I like this thread.

I understand what Dan says, weight lifting (what we call body-building, although under that label goes too much stuff) may produce stiffness depending on how you do it and how frequently.

However an athletical preparation is needed in all sports (aikidokas should go running or also do some weight lifting if they enjoy it, or rope skipping which is great to make you jump like a cricket ) - consider 100mt runners, those shoulders many have are not strictly necessary for running, and yet they train legs and arms regularly with weights and although their legs are supposed to be ultrafast, they do squats with incredbly heavy loads that, arguably, should have slowed them down.

If you make weight lifting together with other athletical preparations, more aerobic oriented, they won't really make you physically starchy. Of course it also depends on how much you maximize weight when you lift - you can maximize weight or repetitions, or better a combination of both.

By and large it does not rally matter what you practice, as long as there is an atlethical intensity that produces improved cenesthesis («the combination of organic sensations that comprise an individual's awareness of bodily existence»). Being aware of your body in motion is important, improves your performance and preparedness for all scenarios (well, at least physically) and induces a feeling of physical wellness that is bound to be helpful.

Whatever atlethical preparation you may get, transfers its benefits to whatever sport you practice, inclusive of aikido.

A trivial example: a speed bag. You may hit it while holding in your grip half or 1 whole kilo. After half an hour of that you won't be less fast, on the contrary you will be ultrafast.

Weight lifting, if practiced intensively having another goal in mind, and consequently matched with other preparations, won't stiffen you - but Dan is right insomuch as if you practice weight lifting having in mind only weight lifitng, well then it will slow you down because you're implementing a work out that does not take rapidity into account (arguably, a bodybuilder who goes in competitions does not need that and so does not care).

ps does not need or needs not? English lessons
All due respect I am not willing to debate or argue with you over this. You and Chris are simply wrong. Lifting ...with appropriate stretching will still change your body in a negative way for martial arts. I have lost track of big muscular guys getting tuned by smaller guys, and not just by waza. You can see it in *good* soft jujutsu, you can see it in internals, you can see it in *good* judo.

Frankly, I dismiss the lifting argument out of hand. It is just such a low level understanding of combatives. Yet every few years someone starts it all up again and thinks some new fangled western science approach to training is the ticket.
There are any number of *real* engineers, amateur engineers, sport guys and bodyworkers, pushing "the science" of martial movement and any number of speed training and strength training paradigms(and now with great hubris and total lack of skill they have applied their banter to internals) with followers on various forums who turn out to feel and move just like every other Tom, Dick and Harry.
I have no interest or time for debating it on the internet anymore-I just wanted to state my opinion.
Cheers
Dan
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Old 05-23-2012, 02:42 PM   #58
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

I honor your position Dan.
You are a person who has paid his dues and speaks from experience.
And I would love to learn from you in August.
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Old 05-23-2012, 03:01 PM   #59
Alberto_Italiano
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
All due respect I am not willing to debate or argue with you over this. You and Chris are simply wrong. Lifting ...with appropriate stretching will still change your body in a negative way for martial arts. I have lost track of big muscular guys getting tuned by smaller guys, and not just by waza. You can see it in *good* soft jujutsu, you can see it in internals, you can see it in *good* judo.

Frankly, I dismiss the lifting argument out of hand. It is just such a low level understanding of combatives. Yet every few years someone starts it all up again and thinks some new fangled western science approach to training is the ticket.
There are any number of *real* engineers, amateur engineers, sport guys and bodyworkers, pushing "the science" of martial movement and any number of speed training and strength training paradigms(and now with great hubris and total lack of skill they have applied their banter to internals) with followers on various forums who turn out to feel and move just like every other Tom, Dick and Harry.
I have no interest or time for debating it on the internet anymore-I just wanted to state my opinion.
Cheers
Dan
But you are perfectly entitled to your opinion Dan. Nobody here takes a different and respectful opinon like arguing.

The only thing I can say, I have been training for over 30 years by now (no interruptions, about 5 times a week at least till today) I have always practiced wieght lifting, in the meanwhile I have boxed and sparred intensively in my twenties, I now practice aikido i jog skip rope and still do weight lifting and I am certainly not worse (neither better lol) than many others in Aikido that we routinely see in our average dojos.

Indeed, in my factual experience, weight lifting causes no issue - it just develops power, which is as needed as speed (or at any rate, as helpful).
Let me be clear: i am not arguing as well - I simply state that for me, I can attest that weight lifting does not cause any inconvenient in combative sports (like it doesn't in athletics, which need even more speed than ours at times - 100mt runners who rely uniquely on explosive speed do weight lifting a lot, and so on...)

Your opinion and experience is fine. Mine, leads to a different conclusion though. There can certainly be a reason for these confliting views. Maybe we're speaking of different type of trainings or we have in mind different scenarios that we assume as implied (I have learned on these forums how often things that we give as implied in sports are not such).

Personally, I would not discourage anyone from weight lifting. I am sorry to hear that you had bad experiences (or at least so i understood or misunderstood) with guys who eprhaps were weight lifting in a fanatic manner (there are plenty, inclusive of those who take substances and hormones!)

ps perhaps that's the point we were skipping: weight lifting is not "a level of understanding of combatives". Undoubtedly those who think so are wrong and if you met guys who tought that the more they have muscles the harder they hit I can produce several feather wieghts who could hurt heavy weights! The idea that muscles are necessary for fighting is wrong, in fact: you're right.

Weight lifitng, when correctly understood, is practiced as a component of general athletic preparation, not as a component of combat.

Last edited by Alberto_Italiano : 05-23-2012 at 03:09 PM.
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Old 05-23-2012, 03:19 PM   #60
Alberto_Italiano
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

I think I got what you're talking of: guys who thing the bigger their biceps the better they fight. Its is not so, they are deluded individuals who don't know that biceps count nothing as far as the outcome of a fight is concerned. Nothing.

However, it is not true that if you have biceps then they will stay in the way of your fighting abilities (we could produce thousands of instances of worldwide class champs who had muscular mass too)
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Old 05-23-2012, 07:31 PM   #61
hughrbeyer
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

I've been noodling on this for a while and maybe it's worth sharing...

It's well known in the lifting community that weight lifting increases muscle tone. In this context "muscle tone" means something very specific--it's the residual tension remaining in the muscle when the muscle is relaxed. So weight lifting increases that tension. This is why people who bench a lot tend to get rounded shoulders (and injuries) if they don't do balancing back work--the increased tension on the chest and anterior delts pulls the shoulders out of position.

But we know that any muscle tension gets in the way of IS work and aiki power--all the experts have been teaching this since forever. It blocks the connection to hara and makes it impossible to use internal power.

So, quite possibly, that's why weight lifting gets in the way of internal power. It increases the resting tension of the muscles, making it impossible to relax to the degree required to transmit internal power properly. It makes you "tight."
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:07 PM   #62
phitruong
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Hugh Beyer wrote: View Post

So, quite possibly, that's why weight lifting gets in the way of internal power. It increases the resting tension of the muscles, making it impossible to relax to the degree required to transmit internal power properly. It makes you "tight."
there are ways to use weights in internal training, but it isn't the usual run of the mills weight training. there are more ways to do it wrong too.

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:14 PM   #63
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Oh yes. I agree if what you mean by tension is tightness.
I have lost plenty of tension over the last decade. The killer for me is that I have also lost allot of mass and tone in all the wrong places. : (

Then the old injuries began talking to me. Some of the worst of it is ligament and tendon imbalance. I tried many practices over 40 years. Nothing cured it. But the Nautilus machines helped. So does kayaking and swimming in similar but not exact ways.
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:16 PM   #64
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

I may just move to Saint Kitts and heal up in the warm salt waters....
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Old 05-24-2012, 08:03 PM   #65
Brian Beach
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
All due respect I am not willing to debate or argue with you over this. You and Chris are simply wrong. Lifting ...with appropriate stretching will still change your body in a negative way for martial arts. I have lost track of big muscular guys getting tuned by smaller guys, and not just by waza. You can see it in *good* soft jujutsu, you can see it in internals, you can see it in *good* judo.

Frankly, I dismiss the lifting argument out of hand. It is just such a low level understanding of combatives. Yet every few years someone starts it all up again and thinks some new fangled western science approach to training is the ticket.
There are any number of *real* engineers, amateur engineers, sport guys and bodyworkers, pushing "the science" of martial movement and any number of speed training and strength training paradigms(and now with great hubris and total lack of skill they have applied their banter to internals) with followers on various forums who turn out to feel and move just like every other Tom, Dick and Harry.
I have no interest or time for debating it on the internet anymore-I just wanted to state my opinion.
Cheers
Dan
Not looking to argue but rather clarification - What I know about IS could fill a thimble.

I've heard " Ki no Strength = No Power, Strength no Ki = Power, Ki + Strength = Power."

Also Nadeau sensei talks about form and flow, giving proper structure for the ki to flow. He's a (former?) weight trainer.

Also standing meditation etc are strengthening exercises as well as what ever they may accomplish mentally or for ki development. Holding the postures are difficult.

I don't see how you can be out of hand dismissive of external strength training as it relates to Martial Arts. I know that strength can allow you to cheat on technique but it's not a given. I know "soft" big men. In a fight all factors being equal any advantage is an advantage. Whether it be conditioning, training, strength etc.
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Old 05-24-2012, 09:02 PM   #66
hughrbeyer
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Phi, yeah, there may be ways to use weights in internal training but I don't know any that have the goal of increasing muscular strength, which is what weight training is all about.

Brian, the whole point of the standing meditations, as I understand it, is that after a while you have to find a way to hold the position without using muscular strength because your muscles give out. Similar idea to doing 1000 suburi--by the 1000th, you're probably not using muscular strength any more.
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Old 05-24-2012, 10:09 PM   #67
DH
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Brian Beach wrote: View Post
1. Not looking to argue but rather clarification - What I know about IS could fill a thimble.
2. I don't see how you can be out of hand dismissive of external strength training as it relates to Martial Arts.
3. In a fight all factors being equal any advantage is an advantage. Whether it be conditioning, training, strength etc.
Well, statement #3 is simply false. You don't understand the advantages of IS; what it takes to achieve it and how lifting can obviate it and produce a different result.
#1 Explains why you don't understand my points.
#2 Is the natural result of not understanding #1

None of what I stated is my point alone. It is shared all over the world by people who do understand IS.
Cheers
Dan
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Old 05-25-2012, 12:32 AM   #68
sakumeikan
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Well, statement #3 is simply false. You don't understand the advantages of IS; what it takes to achieve it and how lifting can obviate it and produce a different result.
#1 Explains why you don't understand my points.
#2 Is the natural result of not understanding #1

None of what I stated is my point alone. It is shared all over the world by people who do understand IS.
Cheers
Dan
Dear Dan
, Sorry to have point out this fact.In Brians comment No 3. he only states any advantage is an advantage .He does not mention lifting[weights ?].Maybe I am a bit dull but Brians comment makes sense to me.As he says ALL things being EQUAL the bigger, stronger, fitter person wins.Tell me any sport where this is not the case?Since you disagree with this premise , give our readers an explanation why you feel otherwise. Hope you are well, Cheers, Joe.
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Old 05-25-2012, 05:25 AM   #69
Brian Beach
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Well, statement #3 is simply false. You don't understand the advantages of IS; what it takes to achieve it and how lifting can obviate it and produce a different result.
#1 Explains why you don't understand my points.
#2 Is the natural result of not understanding #1

None of what I stated is my point alone. It is shared all over the world by people who do understand IS.
Cheers
Dan
I fully concede my ignorance. I'm asking you to throw me a bone and explain why however surface the explanation needs to be from my point of ignorance.

Maybe if ask in a different way. If you take on two students equally without knowledge, one worked on a farm (lifting and throwing heavy things), the other a milquetoast academic and you bring them along for x amount of time with the same training. Are you saying that the academic will always have a combative advantage?
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Old 05-25-2012, 06:46 AM   #70
Anjisan
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Ai symbol Re: Arm locks... really???????

There is another way that one may view this. Instead of arguing whether or not weight lifting will help those who choose to engage in IS, view it from the perspective of combat as a whole. Specifically whether one chooses to do IS or not we are all human and imperfect. Therefore, during combat one's techniques, IS based or not may not immediately and effectively work. Consequently, you most likely will take some hits, punches, elbows, kicks, etc and if you weight train your body may be able to withstand the blows better and thus allow you to continue the interaction. Experienced fighters from MMA to Bruce Lee have expounded on the many values of weight training, sure in moderation, but weight training.
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Old 05-25-2012, 07:50 AM   #71
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Weight bearing or weight loading exercises are important. I note that the army and marine corps have pretty much gone to functional based physical test. Weight lifting or training ala Arnold style per se does not make for a better soldier or marine. Pretty much all schools of thought today dealing with military or MMA follow the same type of training regimes. Much of what is done in that IP/IT circles is relevant and helpful. There is a time and place for everything.

Me, I just got out of the hospital following surgery to reconstruct my shoulder from an uchi mata gone bad. Needless to say my training regime will be drastically different over the next 6 months. It has also giving me a new perspective on resistance, use of muscle, and strength. My right arm essentially does not work right now. Should be fun.

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Old 05-25-2012, 09:22 AM   #72
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
Weight bearing or weight loading exercises are important. I note that the army and marine corps have pretty much gone to functional based physical test. Weight lifting or training ala Arnold style per se does not make for a better soldier or marine. Pretty much all schools of thought today dealing with military or MMA follow the same type of training regimes. Much of what is done in that IP/IT circles is relevant and helpful. There is a time and place for everything.

Me, I just got out of the hospital following surgery to reconstruct my shoulder from an uchi mata gone bad. Needless to say my training regime will be drastically different over the next 6 months. It has also giving me a new perspective on resistance, use of muscle, and strength. My right arm essentially does not work right now. Should be fun.
I feel your pain Kevin,
best of luck in your recuperation and the new insights it brings.

Clydesdales (great strength but cannot bring it up fast enought in a fight) and Chippendales (beautifully cut forms suited for Holywood and dancing) surely ain't what the military is looking for.

In fact, isn't the Army Ranger's perfect model of human athletic conditioning within the 170 pound range? Muscle or fat, the heart has to pump the same amount of blood through the mass. And mass is the kiss of death on long-haul work-outs like the battlefield.....
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:27 AM   #73
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
Location: ohio
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Now for another look at throwing from the 2 on 1 grip. Moe Stevens (40 year Tomiki, Jujitsu, Judo and wrestling Instructor) using his well integrated hip-wiggle to to throw from Sumi Otoshi.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNPJ1Y_oIc8
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:41 AM   #74
DH
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,394
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Quote:
Joe Curran wrote: View Post
Dear Dan
Sorry to have point out this fact.In Brians comment No 3. he only states any advantage is an advantage .He does not mention lifting[weights ?].Maybe I am a bit dull but Brians comment makes sense to me.
Hi Again Joe.
I am delighted that you guys continue to believe that stronger, bigger...is the way to go. I see no advantage in trying to change your mind either.
You are continually....as in thousands of years of history....proven wrong. Right up to many fights in the UFC where men with 70 lb advantages lost against jujutsu.

Quote:
Tell me any sport where this is not the case?
I'm not talking about sports...you are.

Quote:
Since you disagree with this premise, give our readers an explanation why you feel otherwise. Hope you are well, Cheers, Joe.
I have, along with others for 16 years on the net.
And 1,100 people later; to include many Shihan and Menkyo and MMA and BJJers later....
Not a single one of you have ever proven our model wrong in person (not that it matters that we have to be 100% correct anyway. It's just turned out that way I would allow for failures in a model). And most of you switched and want to train it.
Think of it.....
All of the arguments that you.... as a collected whole have made.... have all failed in person.
And you still want to debate it?
Debate what?

Cheers
Dan

Last edited by DH : 05-25-2012 at 09:48 AM.
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Old 05-25-2012, 10:00 AM   #75
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
Location: ohio
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 740
United_States
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Re: Arm locks... really???????

Dan,

I, for one, read your constructive explanations about what you do. I am still a bit hazy on how it is experienced and being a phenomenologist to a large degree, I would prefer to rely on my experience of things.

I also know what it is like to walk a road less travelled and the ridicule you have likely received by being public about it. I honor you for that. It takes a determined and confident will to navigate such a path. Likely, in 30 more years when you have trained the 100th monkey and the system becomes dominant, some folks who were the ones ridiculing you will likely have come full circle and, claim they developed it. That is the way of things from my experience. So kudos to you.

And, as for me, I would be grateful to experience it and learn what i cannot fully grasp online.
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