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Morpheus
01-13-2004, 11:14 PM
I'm getting ready to begin studying Aikido with the intention of eventually teaching and running a dojo (however many years that will be in the future).

Can anyone tell me what are the USAF requirements for Fukushidoin, and Shidoin? Is it just a matter of being proficient and completing the requirements for a certain Dan grade, or is there more?

Again, I haven't started and I didn't think to ask the principal instructor what the requirements were when I visited the dojo to observe a class.

The only reason I'm even asking at this point is because I kept seeing, these titles while I've been reading different articles and forum threads.

rachmass
01-14-2004, 07:53 AM
Everyone else from the USAF chime in on this one please.

From what I understand, it depends on the regional affiliation. With Chiba Sensei and the Western Region, there are actual tests for Fukushidoin and Shidoin, and I think he's looking for a level of clarity and proficency in his teachers. F starts at Nidan, and S at Yondan.

With Shibata Sensei, it is based on his recommendation, as he knows all the students within his organization.

With the ER, it is also (I think) based on recommendation. Have no idea how it works in the Midwest region.

Why not ask the teacher whose dojo you wish to join?

Paul Sanderson-Cimino
01-14-2004, 12:30 PM
Don't get ahead of yourself. ^_- It will probably be quite a while before you're ready to open a dojo.

Morpheus
01-14-2004, 01:52 PM
Oh it will most definitely be quite a while, but I'm planning ahead for the future.

AsimHanif
01-14-2004, 02:39 PM
Best wishes to you Uriah. I too have long range goals. It helps as I take on those short term objectives.

Are you planning on attending NY Aikikai? I'm not with Aikikai anymore but I believe Rachel is right. I'm very sure Yamada Sensei or one of the seniors there would love to clarify this for you.

Morpheus
01-14-2004, 04:33 PM
Are you planning on attending NY Aikikai?
I may go there occasionally, I'm going to be taking class at Aikido of Park Slope with Lehrman Sensei.

Jorge Garcia
01-15-2004, 03:27 AM
I know a sensei who is in USAF East who is a fuku-shidoin. He is 3rd Dan and has been in aikido for more than 15 years. All the shidoins I have heard of in USAF East are 5th or 6th Dan so in that group, you are definitely talking about 25 to 30 years of experience. As for the Midwest Aikido Federation, their requirements for those certifications are not things that most humans can qualify for. Jo Birdsong of Aikido of Austin has 34 years of experience in Aikido and never got past fuku-shidoin until he switched to USAF East.

PeterR
01-15-2004, 03:39 AM
Related questions.

In various organizations how important is the Fukoshiodin/Shiodin designation especially with respect to opening up a dojo?

Do you get Fukoshiodin before or after you start teaching on your own?

Is the any benefit to having these titles?

Jorge Garcia
01-15-2004, 07:18 AM
Related questions.

In various organizations how important is the Fukoshiodin/Shiodin designation especially with respect to opening up a dojo?

Do you get Fukoshiodin before or after you start teaching on your own?

Is the any benefit to having these titles?


In the USAF, a teaching title isn't required to open a dojo. In The AAA, they have many teaching titles that the other groups don't use and you get your first one as a brown belt so by the time you open a dojo, you will have one but I haven't noticed that a teaching title gives any benefits besides the ability to recommend for rank up to two ranks below your own. Having said that, they don't like you to do it. A 6th dan in the USAF once told me that he could recommend black belts ranks but it really had to be an emergency because they wanted to see those people in the training camp befroe the test if at all possible.

rachmass
01-15-2004, 07:57 AM
I can give you my own experience if it helps. I have my fukushidoin certificate, which I got by recommendation through my teacher under Shibata Sensei. I was already a nidan of two years at that time, and had been asked to test for the certificate under Chiba Sensei, but our dojo split with Shibata and didn't get the chance. When I decided to open a dojo, I went ER and simple protocol was that I have my certificate reinstated with the ER.

I would not have felt comfortable starting a dojo without this certificate, as I was only a nidan when the dojo opened (now sandan). It isn't required for having a dojo, but is required to test your students.

The length of time it takes you to be able to be proficient enough to start a dojo is really quite individual. Going into aikido with the idea that you want to be a teacher is quite premature IMHO. I've been practicing regularly since 1982(3) and only started teaching in 1994(5). I didn't open a dojo until 2002. When I started, teaching was about the furthest thing from my mind. It has just been a natural progression of my practice.

Both Jorge and Peter R. are teachers and can talk about their experiences too to help give you some perspective on the time and commitment required to do this.

best, Rachel

George S. Ledyard
01-15-2004, 08:35 AM
I can give you my own experience if it helps. I have my fukushidoin certificate, which I got by recommendation through my teacher under Shibata Sensei. I was already a nidan of two years at that time, and had been asked to test for the certificate under Chiba Sensei, but our dojo split with Shibata and didn't get the chance. When I decided to open a dojo, I went ER and simple protocol was that I have my certificate reinstated with the ER.

I would not have felt comfortable starting a dojo without this certificate, as I was only a nidan when the dojo opened (now sandan). It isn't required for having a dojo, but is required to test your students.

The length of time it takes you to be able to be proficient enough to start a dojo is really quite individual. Going into aikido with the idea that you want to be a teacher is quite premature IMHO. I've been practicing regularly since 1982(3) and only started teaching in 1994(5). I didn't open a dojo until 2002. When I started, teaching was about the furthest thing from my mind. It has just been a natural progression of my practice.

Both Jorge and Peter R. are teachers and can talk about their experiences too to help give you some perspective on the time and commitment required to do this.

best, Rachel
I think it is ok for someone to train with the goal of someday being a teacher. A lot of wishful thinking would be clarified if people did this I think. Our own teachers were all trained to be instructors from the start. They were "Uchi Deshi". They had teaching responsibilies right from the beginning and it was clear that they were traiing to be the representatives of this art as it went "public" so to speak. I was certainly trained that way by Saotome Sensei... he flat out stated that he was training instructors when I started in the DC dojo back in the seventies. I always knew I would have a school one day and much of my training was motivated by wanting to make sure that I was up to the standard (of my own expectations) when I did.

If wanting to be a teacher one day motivates the student to train all that much harder, to read everything he or she can find about the art, to be "hungry" for new concepts and technqiues, then why not. If they go the distance with that attitude they will make it to their goal. If they don't they very likely won't.

rachmass
01-15-2004, 08:44 AM
Mr. Ledyard,

I certainly don't disagree with your comments, however I have seen (like you, no doubt) many, many, many people start in the art with this idea, only to quit very quickly when they realize how much hard work is involved. It is almost as if you can read what is going to happen with a student based on how they come into the art. If someone comes in so gung-ho like this and says they want to train every day, devote their life to the art, etc. they almost without exception quit within a few years (this is my experience, yours could be quite different, I understand that). I've seen it happen countless times. What I have also seen just as many times is the person who really regulates themselves and doesn't come in with a specific goal, who ends up going the distance.

You have been in this art longer than I, and have experienced a wider range of folks coming and going. Would you please comment on my observations, and if you have seen this as well.

best regards, Rachel

AsimHanif
01-15-2004, 11:03 AM
Cool Uriah. I trained there for about a year and a half.

I would suggest that you spend as much time at NY Aikikai as possible though.

George S. Ledyard
01-15-2004, 11:38 AM
Mr. Ledyard,

I certainly don't disagree with your comments, however I have seen (like you, no doubt) many, many, many people start in the art with this idea, only to quit very quickly when they realize how much hard work is involved. It is almost as if you can read what is going to happen with a student based on how they come into the art. If someone comes in so gung-ho like this and says they want to train every day, devote their life to the art, etc. they almost without exception quit within a few years (this is my experience, yours could be quite different, I understand that). I've seen it happen countless times. What I have also seen just as many times is the person who really regulates themselves and doesn't come in with a specific goal, who ends up going the distance.

You have been in this art longer than I, and have experienced a wider range of folks coming and going. Would you please comment on my observations, and if you have seen this as well.

best regards, Rachel
Yes, you are absolutely correct. I just cringe now when a new student comes up to me and evuses about how much they love Aikido, love the dojo, love me as a teacher... how it's changing their lives... they are usually about a month to six weeks from being gone. But I don't think telling them to me more steady or realistic helps much. It's just the type of person. Often, if you talk to them you find that they are Green Belts in everything. That this is simply how they do things.

It is absolutely true that a number of teachers I know say that they weren't the stars in the dojo. That they had to work harder for everything than some of the whiz kids and consequently, thirty years later their practice is vert deep and the whiz kids are long gone.

George S. Ledyard
01-15-2004, 12:17 PM
Yes, you are absolutely correct. I just cringe now when a new student comes up to me and evuses about how much they love Aikido, love the dojo, love me as a teacher... how it's changing their lives... they are usually about a month to six weeks from being gone. But I don't think telling them to me more steady or realistic helps much. It's just the type of person. Often, if you talk to them you find that they are Green Belts in everything. That this is simply how they do things.

It is absolutely true that a number of teachers I know say that they weren't the stars in the dojo. That they had to work harder for everything than some of the whiz kids and consequently, thirty years later their practice is vert deep and the whiz kids are long gone.

But I do know that from that DC dojo wher I started with Saotome Sensei there were a number of us that trained 6 or 7 days a week and went the distance in the sense that I can think of five or six of us who enede up running their own schools. We didn't burn out. So I don't think it is a matter of over enthusiasm being what makes someone leave. Every one of the people with whom I have trained who is really top notch spent some period of their lives during which they just trained, every day for some period of time. If someone starts out that way and quits, is it because they burned out too quickly or is it because they would have quit anyway. Most people quit after a short time regardless of how hard they start out. While some folks clearly grow into their love of the art and it becomes an increasingly important part of their lives I also believe that in most of the instances with which I am familiar the folks who are running their own dojos and taking their art to a high level started out strong and never backed off.

George S. Ledyard
01-15-2004, 12:18 PM
Yes, you are absolutely correct. I just cringe now when a new student comes up to me and evuses about how much they love Aikido, love the dojo, love me as a teacher... how it's changing their lives... they are usually about a month to six weeks from being gone. But I don't think telling them to be more steady or realistic helps much. It's just the type of person. Often, if you talk to them you find that they are Green Belts in everything. That this is simply how they do things.

It is absolutely true that a number of teachers I know say that they weren't the stars in the dojo. That they had to work harder for everything than some of the whiz kids and consequently, thirty years later their practice is vert deep and the whiz kids are long gone.

indomaresa
01-15-2004, 12:27 PM
Yes, firecrackers usually disappears without a trace

The candle will burn out longer and illuminates more

kironin
01-15-2004, 12:35 PM
It is absolutely true that a number of teachers I know say that they weren't the stars in the dojo. That they had to work harder for everything than some of the whiz kids and consequently, thirty years later their practice is vert deep and the whiz kids are long gone.
It's certainly good to have long term goals as long as one has realistic short term goals that will eventually result in getting there.

If a new student says they want to become a teacher and have their own dojo, then I would simply remind them that they need look at their schedule, commit themselves weekly to a minimum number of classes and to being at all the seminars we have. Every week take a quick check and recommit to one simple thing, go to class even when they don't feel like going. There is certainly more than can do but that's really the heart of it.

The big picture tends to take of itself then.

Craig

rachmass
01-15-2004, 12:37 PM
Interesting how this thread is developing. Mr. Ledyard, I believe I have met some folks like this as well (the ones who started out strong and really have taken aikido seriously throughout their training). Of the folks I know, it is about 50/50, but that usually the person would start out without any preconceived ideas on where they would want to go with aikido, but within a matter of a year or two, would be going full-swing and great guns. Everyone I know who has a dojo has gone through the 6 day a week training mania (and often still do), and still loves the art. That does seem to be a bit of a prerequiste to significant improvement. Most of the teachers I admire were not naturals at aikido, and worked really, really hard to get good at it. It seems to me that if it is too easy, it is boring and the practioner quits. Or if they stick around, sometimes they lack the requisite empathy that comes from being a slow learner (or not particularly talented). Just my observation....

best, Rachel

Karen Wolek
01-15-2004, 12:41 PM
I don't know much about the criteria for fukoshidoin or shidoin....my teacher is a fukoshidoin and sandan in the USAF-ER. And he is awesome. :)

I wanted to respond to the goal-to-teach topic, though. I didn't start out doing Aikido with the goal to teach someday...like Rachel said, it was the furthest from my mind. Then I was just happy to put my foot in the right place. (I'm still happy when I do that right, LOL)

But now, 15 whole months (ha) into Aikido, I do want to teach one day and I do hope to open a dojo. Obviously I have a long way to go, but I'm pretty excited to have that goal in mind! I am not a firecracker, I'm a slow-burning candle. I don't have a talent for this, it takes me a long time to learn everything, but I'm determined that I will "get there" someday. I train between 5 and 7 times a week....as many times as I can, really. I'll be testing for 4th kyu soon....so I figure I might be experienced enough to open a dojo in say, 15 years or so, LOL!

But I don't see anything wrong with looking to the future....I'm just excited to share this art!

Now.....if I could just get over the panic I feel when I'm paired with a newbie! <grin>

Ron Tisdale
01-15-2004, 01:00 PM
My own experience seems interesting in view of the posts so far. I believe when I started in the yoshinkan, I told my primary teacher that I wouldn't mind teaching some day if I got good enough (or something to that affect). The more I trained, the more I realized it would be harder than I thought to have a dojo of my own and teach.

Teaching an occational class in someone else's dojo is one thing; having your own dojo quite another. I no longer have any strong wish to have my own dojo. I am more than happy (at least at present) just to have a place where I can train. I think only the lack of a place where I could train happily would influence me to open a dojo now...

Ron

Morpheus
01-15-2004, 02:43 PM
Related questions.

In various organizations how important is the Fukoshiodin/Shiodin designation especially with respect to opening up a dojo?

Do you get Fukoshiodin before or after you start teaching on your own?

Is the any benefit to having these titles?
Thanks for asking that question.:D

Morpheus
01-15-2004, 02:58 PM
...If wanting to be a teacher one day motivates the student to train all that much harder, to read everything he or she can find about the art, to be "hungry" for new concepts and technqiues, then why not. If they go the distance with that attitude they will make it to their goal. If they don't they very likely won't.
Thanks for the words of encouragement. ;)

Erik
01-15-2004, 03:37 PM
If a child or teenager said they wanted to be a school teacher when they grew up we'd support them and think it's a good thing. Show up at a college with the same attitude and we'd be thrilled.

Show up at a dojo with that attitude and....

PeterR
01-15-2004, 07:35 PM
Both Jorge and Peter R. are teachers and can talk about their experiences too to help give you some perspective on the time and commitment required to do this.
Rachel;

I am probably the worst example you could find. One year of Aikido at Tsukuba University, three years at Honbu, one year with an Aikikai group in Quebec followed by a seminar with my teacher from Japan in the US which made me realize what I was missing. I grabbed a few friends and away we went - I only had Shodan but the group grew.

After I returned to Japan I was still quite a distance from Honbu. When I went to Shihan for a recomendation of a place to train I ended up with time at a 380 tatami dojo and a Nidan Japanese assistant. I was still only Shodan - but his sempai. I have since been promoted.

In Canada I was given permission to test 8th Kyu to 5th Kyu, here I take my crew to Honbu. My function at gradings is to take ukemi - that's it.

I could best be described as an Instructor under supervision. This in itself is an anomoly as I can't think of anyone else in the same circumstance here in Japan. We don't have the Fukoshiodin title, although we have Shiodin. JAA instructors are quite rare - minimum of Yondan, usually ex-deshi (professional full-time apprentice). Shiodin are rarer still and in either case rank is no guarantee.

Instructor/Shiodin in Japan can award grades - I think that is the only benefit. Usually two below your own but only Shihan can award Yondan and up.

Honbu teaches you to teach. As you move up the food chain your chance of being paired with a grade below you for instructional purposes increases. This means I had a fair idea not only how to do what I taught but also to teach what I knew.

I taught only so I could train. That was true in Canada - that is ture here.

philipsmith
01-16-2004, 02:52 AM
The Aikikai Hombu regulations are reasonably strict as regards eligibility for Fukushidoin and Shidoin but leaves the actual appointment process to individual organisations.

I was appointed Fukushidoin & Shidoin by Chiba Sensei during his time in the UK without any examination, but he now has a strict examination procedure.

We also have a fairly strict procedure but based on continual assessment over two or three years with special training sessions etc.

As for someone starting Aikido with the ambition of being a teacher; why not? Providing they are prepared to work at it over a long period they should acheive their goal.

kironin
01-16-2004, 03:06 AM
I think only the lack of a place where I could train happily would influence me to open a dojo now...

Ron
which is how I ended up running a dojo.

didn't plan on it. Just became necessary in order to pursure my path.

Craig

PeterR
01-16-2004, 03:20 AM
which is how I ended up running a dojo.

didn't plan on it. Just became necessary in order to pursure my path.
Exactly - we're all creatures of circumstance.

I do think that starting and training in any Budo with a view to being an instructor probably reflects all the wrong reasons or at the very least a misunderstanding of what is involved - no offence to those that do. It's usually just another variation of the hyper-enthusiastic soon to burn out type.

That said - I don't think it takes 10 years to figure out what level of commitment you are willing to give.

I can only advise to put any ideas of being an instructor out of your head for at least the first couple of years. That avoids a related problem - the dreaded 5th kyu Shihan.

Cheers

AsimHanif
01-16-2004, 10:39 AM
Great analogy Erik!

Jack Simpson
01-16-2004, 01:30 PM
Uriah,

I wouldn't worry about Fuku, Shidoin, Sensei..... If you're committed (and who among us that have trained for awhile shouldn't be ;) ) the ranks and titles will take care of themselves. For now, and then, train hard.

Besides, by the time you're ready, who knows what the requirements will be. I know I had particular troubles with the "randori against mounted samurai with uzi's" part of my test ;-).

Jack :ai:

P.S. If you end up at Aikido of Park Slope say hi to Hal for me. I got the opportunity to train with him in Bermuda and had a great time.

Jack Simpson
01-16-2004, 01:51 PM
...and in case you're wondering, I have no idea what the requirements were for obtaining my fukushidoin certification (USAF-ER). I asked Clyde (Takeguchi Sensei) if I needed to write an essay or something and he just smiled. But then he smiles at most things. Good luck and did I mention, train hard ?

Jack :ai:

kironin
01-16-2004, 04:05 PM
Great analogy Erik!
except :D

they are thrilled because the likelihood of making a decent living from a college education is a lot higher than from obtaining an aikido teaching certificate.

There are teachers in my region trying to make a living at teaching aikido. In one case it was a childhood ambition fulfilled. I look upon them as the blessed insane. I hope they can succeed but the commercial aspect of needing to put food on the table for your family has certainly created problems in those dojos. Running a dojo for profit is in my experience a bit of a culture clash with the general aikido culture. Those who pull it off successfully are very few.

I think it's great that a student loves aikido so much that they want to teach it to others. As long as they channel that desire into being a dedicated student, it's simply great. It's just when a beginner starts talking about having their own school that I think they have either been touched by the pixies or on the dark side a potential to be a future problem.

Too often in the martial arts, it occurs that a student doesn't have the patience to train long enough. Many quit but for some others... Just this past month, a friend sent me the website of this 20-something kid who had spent a few years (2-3) getting a karate shodan with a local respected teacher and then went out on his own to start a new school, got an organization to give him a 10th dan rank of his new improved karate style and calls himself 'soke'. Opened new family oriented school, created fancy website, etc.

of course the commericalism already present in karate means it's possible to make a pretty good living if you cater to kids like he is doing.

If someone aspires to teach because they love the art, great. You don't have to run a dojo to do that. Many dojos would love to add classes taught by someone who is qualified and loves to do it. On the other hand, if you are a beginner and that doesn't appeal to you as much as having your own dojo, I think it's only natural for a teacher to wonder about your reasons.

You may turn out to have good reasons, but there is no shortage of bad ones IMHO.

Craig

Morpheus
01-16-2004, 06:08 PM
I was thinking this a few days ago, but today's posts have convinced me of this. How many people who've read this thread are/were thinking that it is being posted by a teenager or a "20 something"?

Neither applies.

I look toward later on, particularly when retirement comes around. I'm not looking to be sitting around twiddling my thumbs. I'd taken jujutsu before this, and plan to continue to cross train later after I've built proper habits in Aikido (years from now, at least Dan level) don't want to have a clash of methods to confuse me.

For those of you who've heard of or met Sensei Luqman Abdul Hakeem, we've got a connection by marriage so, watching his classes years ago and of course speaking to him, planted the seeds so to speak.

I have at minimum 18 more years before retirement (early retirement for me is 55 + new baby = 58 years old). So why train at all if there is no intent to pass Aikido on to another generation and to stay active in the later years?

I'm not offended, so no one should get that impression. However, for those who have so much more experience, assumptions about someone's motives should be reserved until they get to know more about the person. I welcome any dialogue on this.

PeterR
01-16-2004, 08:34 PM
I was thinking this a few days ago, but today's posts have convinced me of this. How many people who've read this thread are/were thinking that it is being posted by a teenager or a "20 something"?
Pretty much all of us - sorry. :D

I still think starting Aikido with a view to being an instructor is premature - but in light of your post - go for it.

Cheers

rachmass
01-16-2004, 08:59 PM
Hello Morpheus

Pardon this extremely long response, but your last response to this post made me wonder what happened that got under your skin. I have cut and paste snippets of the conversation in trying to figure out what happened.

The quote that started the thread:
I'm getting ready to begin studying Aikido with the intention of eventually teaching and running a dojo (however many years that will be in the future).

response: Don't get ahead of yourself. ^_- It will probably be quite a while before you're ready to open a dojo.

Now this wasn't a negative comment, just an observation based on experience that it takes a long time to get to that point.
The length of time it takes you to be able to be proficient enough to start a dojo is really quite individual. Going into aikido with the idea that you want to be a teacher is quite premature IMHO. I've been practicing regularly since 1982(3) and only started teaching in 1994(5). I didn't open a dojo until 2002. When I started, teaching was about the furthest thing from my mind. It has just been a natural progression of my practice.

This was my comment, which was that it is a long haul and it was not on my mind when I started; it was a personal response, which I think is what you were looking for.
I think it is ok for someone to train with the goal of someday being a teacher. A lot of wishful thinking would be clarified if people did this I think.

The above is a thoughtful response from an experienced teacher.
Yes, firecrackers usually disappears without a trace
The candle will burn out longer and illuminates more

two comments that were more towards the discussion that Mr. Ledyard and I were involved in rather than the comments to your questions.
It's certainly good to have long term goals as long as one has realistic short term goals that will eventually result in getting there.

Good obeservation
If a new student says they want to become a teacher and have their own dojo, then I would simply remind them that they need look at their schedule, commit themselves weekly to a minimum number of classes and to being at all the seminars we have

also a good observation
If a child or teenager said they wanted to be a school teacher when they grew up we'd support them and think it's a good thing. Show up at a college with the same attitude and we'd be thrilled.

this is true, but I think for a large part it is answered by the quote three down.
As for someone starting Aikido with the ambition of being a teacher; why not? Providing they are prepared to work at it over a long period they should acheive their goal.
I wouldn't worry about Fuku, Shidoin, Sensei..... If you're committed (and who among us that have trained for awhile shouldn't be ) the ranks and titles will take care of themselves. For now, and then, train hard.
I think it's great that a student loves aikido so much that they want to teach it to others. As long as they channel that desire into being a dedicated student, it's simply great. It's just when a beginner starts talking about having their own school that I think they have either been touched by the pixies or on the dark side a potential to be a future problem.
I'm not offended, so no one should get that impression. However, for those who have so much more experience, assumptions about someone's motives should be reserved until they get to know more about the person. I welcome any dialogue on this.

As Mr. Rehse pointed out, we probably all thought you were a younger bloke or teenager. This has been a common subject on this forum by some younger members. Thank you for explaining yourself.

In any case, remember this forum is for people to exchange thoughts and opinions, and so it is natural that there will be disagreement. I think you got a good cross section of opinions from a bunch of folks, at least 4 teachers included.

You are fortunate to be located in an area with very good aikido, and should have a very enjoyable experience with the art. Hope to meet you some day on the mat :)

best, Rachel

Morpheus
01-16-2004, 10:09 PM
I said, "I'm not offended, so no one should get that impression."
Hello Morpheus

Pardon this extremely long response, but your last response to this post made me wonder what happened that got under your skin.
Nothing got under my skin. Just making the observation that assumptions were made.

If we meet on the mat any time this year, I'll be the 40 year old taking it one day at a time, working hard, and to quote Maxwell Smart, "...and loving it."

Thanks ;)

SmilingNage
01-18-2004, 12:32 AM
Its healthy to have teaching aspirations. Its a funny thing, in the early ranks there is the feeling of "knowing" something about Aikido. But the more time I spend with Aikido, the more I realize the vastness of the Art. My knowledge would be lucky to be considered a damp mark in the bucket, not even enough to be a drop in the bucket; A speck of dampness. (

It's an honor to be asked to teach Aikido. If you have the dream to become a teacher, you should be asked to do so. Drop the notion of one day becoming a teacher and just train with honesty and an open mind. Drop the "wanting" to become a teacher, and become a student. Come to learn without an agenda, then your mind will be open to what is being taught to you.

AsimHanif
01-18-2004, 08:15 AM
Uriah - I have heard many great things about Luqman Sensei. I have many friends in the Vee Jitsu family who speak well of him. In fact my first aikido instructor Irving Faust, was his student.

Someone once said to me - when searching for an instructor ask yourself, if he/she wasn't doing martial arts for a living what would they be doing? Keeping that in mind has always helped me not only find good instruction but to also watch myself.

I had 2 dojos in Harlem before I moved to VA but I always had other sources of income. I too am not a "spring chicken" and have to provide for a family. I agree with Craig Hocker that if you rely on just teaching there may be times when you have to "sell out" to make ends meet.

But like academic teaching, I consider aikido instruction like any other form of social work. Underappreciated, underpaid, but extremely necessary.

BTW - take the age assumptions as a compliment. It shows you have that great while belt spirit in life not just aikido.

Peace.

Morpheus
01-22-2004, 02:52 PM
Thanks Asim. I might be speaking to him this afternoon. Haven't told him yet that I was going to begin studying Aikido. His son may have already told him though.