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Daniel Lloyd
03-23-2011, 05:36 PM
What style of Aikido do you practice? What's training like? What's your lineage for your particular dojo? Have you only practiced Aikido or have you dabbled in other arts?


I also requested everyone else on the forum answer these questions too, I'm curious about their Aikido backgrounds and any other training they have received. So I'll share mine.

I practice Aikido Yuishinkai, a branch off from Ki Society. Only recently, due to some great advice from Tony and my own father, that I start taking Aikido seriously and train in a more serious and curious manner. I have only practiced Aikido but have had suggestions to take up Judo to further understand balance breaking and the such. I also hope to take up Kenjutsu or another sword art to better understand the weapons side to Aikido.

Keen to hear others.

Daniel

Janet Rosen
03-23-2011, 06:50 PM
Daniel, I understand your curiosity. I'd say that for many of us who have been on this and similar forums for years, we've answered these questions so many times for newbies that (1) many of us know each other's backgrounds already and (2) we aren't in a big rush to do it again.
I'm an aikimutt who has trained since 1996 in dojos representing a fairly wide spectrum of what is covered under the broad umbrella of Aikikai + more recently a dojo w/ lineage originally from very early Ki Society but for a longtime independent, plus played at seminars w/ high ranking folks from a variety of other flavors plus offshoots. I've done a little koryu sword and jo work and wish I were geographically located to do more, regularly. My only previous martial art was being from Brooklyn.

Flintstone
03-24-2011, 08:11 AM
Aikijujutsu Yoseikan.
Aikido (Tamura line and some exposure to Iwama Ryu).
Nihon Taijutsu.

Carsten Möllering
03-24-2011, 08:32 AM
Aikikai, following Tissier shihan and Endo shihan.

JO
03-24-2011, 11:43 AM
Aikikai. My teachers have all been students of Kanai sensei.

Demetrio Cereijo
03-24-2011, 11:52 AM
Iwama.

phitruong
03-24-2011, 12:05 PM
aikido in the background and foreground and in-between grounds :)

Saotome Sensei said he has no style. He just does aikido and so i am.

Janet Rosen
03-24-2011, 12:55 PM
Saotome Sensei said he has no style. .

You know I hate to disagree with such an eminent person... but as a budobabe I always strive to do aikido with style :D

mathewjgano
03-24-2011, 02:30 PM
I also requested everyone else on the forum answer these questions too, I'm curious about their Aikido backgrounds and any other training they have received. So I'll share mine.

I practice Aikido Yuishinkai, a branch off from Ki Society. Only recently, due to some great advice from Tony and my own father, that I start taking Aikido seriously and train in a more serious and curious manner. I have only practiced Aikido but have had suggestions to take up Judo to further understand balance breaking and the such. I also hope to take up Kenjutsu or another sword art to better understand the weapons side to Aikido.

Keen to hear others.

Daniel

My main experience with Aikido comes from Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja. I don't believe we're traditionally aligned with any particular organization, but for what it's worth I've heard us described as a mix of Tohei and Chiba. We're kind of our own thing when it comes to lineage, as I understand it, coming from a family style of jujutsu.
I also have some experience with the Himeji Shodokan club, which trains very closely with Shodokan Hombu dojo.
Two great places I would highly recommend anyone to try!
Take care,
matt

Hellis
03-24-2011, 03:21 PM
I also requested everyone else on the forum answer these questions too, I'm curious about their Aikido backgrounds and any other training they have received. So I'll share mine.

I practice Aikido Yuishinkai, a branch off from Ki Society. Only recently, due to some great advice from Tony and my own father, that I start taking Aikido seriously and train in a more serious and curious manner. I have only practiced Aikido but have had suggestions to take up Judo to further understand balance breaking and the such. I also hope to take up Kenjutsu or another sword art to better understand the weapons side to Aikido.

Keen to hear others.

Daniel

Daniel

I am pleased that you have decided to study Judo. All the best teachers that I have ever studied with came from Judo to Aikido. These are not teachers that I have attended a seminar with, but studied long term.........Kenshiro Abbe Sensei ~ Tadashi Abe ~ Masahilo Nakazono ~ TK Chiba....It will be good for you. I too came from Judo to Aikido in 1957.

Henry Ellis
http://henryellis-aikido.blogspot.com/

Marc Abrams
03-24-2011, 03:45 PM
I have been a direct student of Imaizumi Sensei since I started Aikido. That being said, I love to go out to seminars and experience other styles.

Marc Abrams

sakumeikan
03-24-2011, 07:04 PM
Daniel

I am pleased that you have decided to study Judo. All the best teachers that I have ever studied with came from Judo to Aikido. These are not teachers that I have attended a seminar with, but studied long term.........Kenshiro Abbe Sensei ~ Tadashi Abe ~ Masahilo Nakazono ~ TK Chiba....It will be good for you. I too came from Judo to Aikido in 1957.

Henry Ellis
http://henryellis-aikido.blogspot.com/

Henry,
Most of the older guys in the U.K were judoka. As a matter fact the late Mick Holloway 6th Dan Shihan , said years ago that when he started training with Chiba Sensei he thought it was Judo he was doing.Chiba Sensei also stated he could never miss a class because
he knew Mick never missed a practice.Mr Holloway was one of the most dedicated students I have ever known.Funny thing was Mick's aikido was totally different from Chiba Sensei's aikido.In an era where
there were aikidoka trying to emulate Chiba Sense[ clones] Mick was
an exception.He did not imitate anybody , he was himself.
Cheers, Joe

sakumeikan
03-24-2011, 07:34 PM
My aikido background.
Came into Aikido via Judo [13 years]. Original teacher William Coyle Sensei[recently deceased ]/Met Chiba Sensei late sixties/early seventies.I am a first generation student of Chiba Sensei.He is my primary teacher and he has had the most influence on my aikido /mindset.
Having said that I have been also exposed to other Shihan , who I have found to be very interesting.These include Tamura/Sekiya/Nobu Iseri/Yamaguchi Shihan.to name but a few.I consider myself to be quite catholic in my training.I used to travel all over the place , studying with loads of different Shihan. Cut back a bit last few years-body cracking up ,time is catching up with me big time.Ready for the gluepot!!
Joe

Hellis
03-25-2011, 03:50 AM
Henry,
Most of the older guys in the U.K were judoka. As a matter fact the late Mick Holloway 6th Dan Shihan , said years ago that when he started training with Chiba Sensei he thought it was Judo he was doing.Chiba Sensei also stated he could never miss a class because
he knew Mick never missed a practice.Mr Holloway was one of the most dedicated students I have ever known.Funny thing was Mick's aikido was totally different from Chiba Sensei's aikido.In an era where
there were aikidoka trying to emulate Chiba Sense[ clones] Mick was
an exception.He did not imitate anybody , he was himself.
Cheers, Joe

Joe

As you know ``all`` the early students came from Judo as you did, we travelled around the UK visiting Judo dojos trying, and sometimes succeeding in promoting Aikido. Can you imagine going into some of those old dojos and doing some of that soft stuff we see today :) I doubt they would have given you the choice of the door or window for your exit...Early Aikido owes a lot to Judo in the UK.

Henry Ellis
http://henryellis-aikido.blogspot.com/

sakumeikan
03-25-2011, 05:19 AM
Joe

As you know ``all`` the early students came from Judo as you did, we travelled around the UK visiting Judo dojos trying, and sometimes succeeding in promoting Aikido. Can you imagine going into some of those old dojos and doing some of that soft stuff we see today :) I doubt they would have given you the choice of the door or window for your exit...Early Aikido owes a lot to Judo in the UK.

Henry Ellis
http://henryellis-aikido.blogspot.com/

Dear Henry,
As a judoka I had trained with many very famous judoka, Geesink, Minatoya, Saburo Matsushita, Kisaburo Watanabe George Kerr. These men were really hard , solid martial artists. However when I saw Chiba Sensei for the first time in Chiswick he was in a different league.I never saw such power coming from anyone like I saw that first time. Chiba Sensei was like a panther,
with an air of danger about his presence.Some people found him
intimidating and they were uneasy in his presence.Personally i found Chiba Sensei MARTIAL attitude intriguing.
As you say if you did Aikido in the early days you needed stamina, lots of energy , determination and an ability to endure pain.Misogi training was serious stuff.3000 Suburi off the belt, hundreds of suwariwaza ikkyo non stop.Your gi would be soaking , like a washing cloth.Despite the fact I had years of Judo training under my belt, aikido was sure tough.After a few sessions under Chiba Sensei my body ached from top to bottom.I think the Judo was a necessary process in order for me to enter the Aikido community. I am indebted to all my Judo teachers and erstwhile training partners for their efforts in forging my body and my mind.
Oh , how I miss the good old days!!
Joe.

ninjaqutie
03-25-2011, 11:14 AM
As you say if you did Aikido in the early days you needed stamina, lots of energy , determination and an ability to endure pain.Misogi training was serious stuff.3000 Suburi off the belt, hundreds of suwariwaza ikkyo non stop.Your gi would be soaking , like a washing cloth.Despite the fact I had years of Judo training under my belt, aikido was sure tough.After a few sessions under Chiba Sensei my body ached from top to bottom.I think the Judo was a necessary process in order for me to enter the Aikido community. I am indebted to all my Judo teachers and erstwhile training partners for their efforts in forging my body and my mind. Oh , how I miss the good old days!!

I have yet to train or meet with Chiba sensei, but I do love hearing stories from my sensei. Sensei was giving us a short lecture the other day (that Chiba had given at a seminar a while ago) about not turning our hips when he wants us to and turning them when he doesn't want us to. :o

Diana Frese
03-25-2011, 02:52 PM
Janet reeled me in with the "aikimutt" label, but I'm from the old days before Tohei Sensei founded the Ki Society, and he was at NY Aikikai as a guest teacher for four months in 1967. Also, at summer camps, Maruyama Sensei taught along similar lines.

Of course, our main teacher was Yamada Sensei, and one of his assistant teachers was Lou Kleinsmith, who was also an assistant instructor to the Tai Chi master Chen Man-ching. T K Lee, also from judo specialized in helping us with suwari waza and multiple attack. Yamada Sensei has always emphasized solid techniques and the basics, which he mentions in demonstrations and in his articles in Federation News.

Maruyama Sensei is the former teacher of Ron Ragusa and Mary Eastland, by the way. I guess I'll write more later. Thanks for asking, Daniel. My information is way old, I haven't trained much in the past twenty years but my husband has agreed to train with me so I can get back into it. He is from Shotokan karate originally, which I also studied for a few years to help my balance, but ended up liking it for itself also, including the kata.

I originally came from a women's judo course, part of the college curriculum and found Aikido confusing at first, then fascinating. Chuck finds that judo which he practiced for the past two years, helps him understand more about the Aikido he studied previously, so now we can start to train together again in Aikido. I had pretty much stopped training in the late eighties due to non aikido related knee injury, job change, family stuff etc....

Personally, I find everyone's story fascinating, so I'll keep reading and maybe add the rest of my story, which Francis Takahashi recently called "eclectic"....

Hellis
03-25-2011, 08:44 PM
My Aikido background.

Came to Aikido from Judo 1956 / 7.

Judo with K Williams Sensei and Kenshiro Abbe Sensei.

Karate with M Harada Sensei 1963 onwards.

Kendo with Tomio Otani Sensei 1959 onwards.

Aikido Dip: OSensei M Ueshiba ( number 349 ) - Kenshiro Abbe Sensei - Masahilo Nakazono Sensei - TK Chiba Sensei - Doshu M Ueshiba.

One of the first five dan grades for Aikido in the UK 1950s.

First Aikido teacher to introduce and teach Aikido to the UK education system 1963.

Taught at the first ever UK Aikido seminar / course with K Williams Sensei in 1959 at the Devises Judo Club....

Henry Ellis
British Aikido History
www.british-aikido.com/

kironin
03-26-2011, 06:33 PM
If you have to watch out for that aikimutt! She is sneaky!

good luck on getting back in!

Janet reeled me in with the "aikimutt" label, but I'm from the old days before Tohei Sensei founded the Ki Society, and he was at NY Aikikai as a guest teacher for four months in 1967. Also, at summer camps, Maruyama Sensei taught along similar lines.

Of course, our main teacher was Yamada Sensei, and one of his assistant teachers was Lou Kleinsmith, who was also an assistant instructor to the Tai Chi master Chen Man-ching. T K Lee, also from judo specialized in helping us with suwari waza and multiple attack. Yamada Sensei has always emphasized solid techniques and the basics, which he mentions in demonstrations and in his articles in Federation News.

Maruyama Sensei is the former teacher of Ron Ragusa and Mary Eastland, by the way. I guess I'll write more later. Thanks for asking, Daniel. My information is way old, I haven't trained much in the past twenty years but my husband has agreed to train with me so I can get back into it. He is from Shotokan karate originally, which I also studied for a few years to help my balance, but ended up liking it for itself also, including the kata.

I originally came from a women's judo course, part of the college curriculum and found Aikido confusing at first, then fascinating. Chuck finds that judo which he practiced for the past two years, helps him understand more about the Aikido he studied previously, so now we can start to train together again in Aikido. I had pretty much stopped training in the late eighties due to non aikido related knee injury, job change, family stuff etc....

Personally, I find everyone's story fascinating, so I'll keep reading and maybe add the rest of my story, which Francis Takahashi recently called "eclectic"....

gregstec
03-26-2011, 07:14 PM
Janet reeled me in with the "aikimutt" label, but I'm from the old days before Tohei Sensei founded the Ki Society, and he was at NY Aikikai as a guest teacher for four months in 1967. Also, at summer camps, Maruyama Sensei taught along similar lines.

Of course, our main teacher was Yamada Sensei, and one of his assistant teachers was Lou Kleinsmith, who was also an assistant instructor to the Tai Chi master Chen Man-ching. T K Lee, also from judo specialized in helping us with suwari waza and multiple attack. Yamada Sensei has always emphasized solid techniques and the basics, which he mentions in demonstrations and in his articles in Federation News.

Maruyama Sensei is the former teacher of Ron Ragusa and Mary Eastland, by the way. I guess I'll write more later. Thanks for asking, Daniel. My information is way old, I haven't trained much in the past twenty years but my husband has agreed to train with me so I can get back into it. He is from Shotokan karate originally, which I also studied for a few years to help my balance, but ended up liking it for itself also, including the kata.

I originally came from a women's judo course, part of the college curriculum and found Aikido confusing at first, then fascinating. Chuck finds that judo which he practiced for the past two years, helps him understand more about the Aikido he studied previously, so now we can start to train together again in Aikido. I had pretty much stopped training in the late eighties due to non aikido related knee injury, job change, family stuff etc....

Personally, I find everyone's story fascinating, so I'll keep reading and maybe add the rest of my story, which Francis Takahashi recently called "eclectic"....

Just for clarification, there are two Maruyama Senseis, - Shuji Maruyama and Koretoshi Maruyama. Both were affiliated with Tohei's Ki Society in the early days, but they are not related.

Shuji is the founder of the Kokikai in Philadelphia and is the Maruyama sensei that most US and European Aikidoka are familiar with. Koretoshi Maruyama was a Honbu deshi that went with Tohei in the split and was Tohei's first chief instructor of the the Ki Society. He was mostly active in the pacific basin of Hawaii, Australia, Guam, and other pacific islands - he is currently head of the Yuishinkai and only has a handful of dojos in the US; mostly Hawaii, California, Colorado, and one dojo in Flordia.

I initially trained with Koretoshi in Guam during the mid 70s.

Greg

kumachan
03-28-2011, 01:21 AM
My main aikido teachers have been Ken Nisson sensei; Paul Kang sensei; Christine Jordan sensei; Mitsugi Saotome sensei; and Hiroshi Ikeda sensei. My limited experience with Yoshio Kuroiwa sensei had a big impact on my aikido as well.

Janet Rosen
03-28-2011, 10:50 AM
My main aikido teachers have been Ken Nisson sensei

I just had the pleasure of meeting Nisson Sensei at a recent seminar in California & sharing a few minutes of conversation.

Jaon Deatherage
03-29-2011, 01:26 PM
late teens early 20's practiced under Hilary Dawson Sensei, Mike Chin Sensei in Victoria BC.

Then a long break occupied with other systems and styles.

More recently, Daniel Kempling, a student of TK Chiba, studying Aikido, Iai, and Kenjutsu.

Diana Frese
03-29-2011, 01:46 PM
Craig, thanks for the good wishes. Greg, sorry about my amnesia, I should have known. And Gene, I am very grateful to those you mentioned, unfortunately, never met Kuroiwa Sensei, though. I just have to add something about Ken Nisson Sensei that I remembered when his birthday celebration was mentioned.

Once when he was teaching pointers on free style years ago at New York Aikikai or later at Bond Street Dojo, he said "throw one problem at another".... I never forgot that and found it useful in daily life even at times when not training in Aikido.