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Kat.C
04-09-2002, 10:11 AM
I am just wondering if it is worth it to get a beginners book on aikido. Have any of you used one and found it useful? Also if you did find one useful could you tell me which one.
Thanks Kat

Randy Pertiet
04-09-2002, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by Kat.C
I am just wondering if it is worth it to get a beginners book on aikido. Have any of you used one and found it useful? Also if you did find one useful could you tell me which one.
Thanks Kat

This book helped clear the cobwebs...

http://www.aikiweb.com/books/detail.html?book_id=71

Kat.C
04-09-2002, 10:56 AM
Originally posted by Randy Pertiet


This book helped clear the cobwebs...

http://www.aikiweb.com/books/detail.html?book_id=71
Does it have alot of diagrams? I learn visually. Actually I learned best in karate when sensei would correct me by physically puttting my hands and feet in the right position. Pity books can't do that. I cannot learn very well by written or oral directions. :disgust: Makes things difficult at times. I did by the way look at some of the book reviews here but they did not say how visual they are. It is aikikai that I am learning don't know if that matters in regards to a book.

Bruce Baker
04-09-2002, 11:15 AM
Out of my thirty some books on aikido, I would say Ultimate Aikido by Yoshimitsu Yamada has some of the best items you are looking for.

Although the many books by John Stevens are in deed intricate and insightful, the simplicity and straight-forwardness of Ultimate Aikido will reinforce your class time as notes to review later. That is what I consider all books I have, notes for things that have already been done in class.

A little book that speaks to the spirit of Aikido, is Kissshomaru Ueshiba's The Spirit of aikido.

Unless you come upon them in a yard sale, or discounted section, My Ultimate Aikido is marked $17.95 and The Spirit of Aikido is marked $8.00. You can find online sources at a discount, but that basically makes shipping free. Check with your teacher on some of these recommendations and see if he/she has a reading list too. I also have the videos by Yamada Sensei, but that will come in time as you your practice progresses.

akiy
04-09-2002, 11:20 AM
As I don't know what "style" of aikido you're currently training in, I can't give any recommendations. The best thing you can do is to ask your teacher(s) for book recommendations.

For me, aikido books and videos are merely supplemental material to actual aikido training...

-- Jun

Greg Jennings
04-09-2002, 11:23 AM
Originally posted by Kat.C
I am just wondering if it is worth it to get a beginners book on aikido. Have any of you used one and found it useful? Also if you did find one useful could you tell me which one.
Thanks Kat

I've found the Takemusu Aikido series by Morihiro Saito / Aikido Journal and Total Aikido: The Master Course by Gozo Shioda to be helpful.

I especially like to use the Takemusu Aikido series and Saito Sensei's videos together.

Unfortunately, these might not be the right tools for your flavor of aikido.

Best Regards,

Greg Jennings
04-09-2002, 11:26 AM
Originally posted by akiy
For me, aikido books and videos are merely supplemental material to actual aikido training...

-- Jun

The visuals are nice, but the feel is everything....

Best,

Kat.C
04-09-2002, 12:45 PM
Thanks for the recommendations guys, I will check out those books as soon as I'm in town next. I learn best by repetition but I don't even know what it was we were doing in class! I know it was just my first class but I got the impression that it was a typical class so I hope that a good book can serve as a guide.
Kat

ScottyC
04-09-2002, 01:27 PM
Before you go buy a book, STOP!

Like Jun alluded to above, you need to consider what style of aikido you study in order to help select a book.

If you train in, oh, say USAF-East, and read "Total Aikido" (Yoshinkan), you will get VERY confused. Especially at a beginner's level.

I would personally recommend that you wait a while before trying to learn from a book. Get a rudimentary feel for what's going on in class first.

Then, ask your sensei or sempai to recommend a couple of books. That way:

(1) You'll have a frame of reference to help you understand the book, and

(2) You'll be sure to get a book that is more directly in line with what you're learning in class.

After a few years of training, reading books from other styles of aikido can be very enlightening, and you can learn a lot. However, you need to have a fairly good grasp of your "home" style before you branch out to others. Without that, the disparate teachings will likely confuse more than clarify.

If you can tell us what style of aikido you're training in, some folks here might have more specific recommendations.

Scott

Kat.C
04-09-2002, 01:30 PM
The style I am training in is aikikai.
Kat

DanielR
04-09-2002, 01:39 PM
Originally posted by ScottyC

If you train in, oh, say USAF-East, and read "Total Aikido" (Yoshinkan), you will get VERY confused. Especially at a beginner's level.

As a beginner training in an Aikikai dojo, I completely agree with Scott - this particular book, despite its obviously great educational value, was a source of major confusion for me when I tried to draw parallels between the techniques learned in the dojo and the techniques demonstrated in the book.

erikmenzel
04-09-2002, 01:52 PM
I will never recommend a book with techniques to a beginner.
There just is no substitute for going to the dojo and train.
If you want some help to remember the techniques etc., buy an empty notebook and make notes after every training.

There is one book however that I would recommend to beginners (and not so beginners also :D ), but it has no techniques in it. Still it is in my opinion a very important book:

The Aikido Student Handbook, by Greg O'Connor,
isbn 1-883319-04-8

Train and enjoy

DanielR
04-09-2002, 02:16 PM
Originally posted by erikknoops
I will never recommend a book with techniques to a beginner.
There just is no substitute for going to the dojo and train.
If you want some help to remember the techniques etc., buy an empty notebook and make notes after every training.

Erik,
While I agree that no book can substitute the actual training, don't you think an appropriate book would be a great supplement, especially if you're trying to recall a technique at home and you have nothing to refer to (I found myself in such situation many times). If I could videotape the sensei, I would, but if I don't have that, having a book with a series of photographs for each technique looks like the next best thing...

erikmenzel
04-09-2002, 02:50 PM
While I agree that no book can substitute the actual training, don't you think an appropriate book would be a great supplement, especially if you're trying to recall a technique at home and you have nothing to refer to (I found myself in such situation many times). If I could videotape the sensei, I would, but if I don't have that, having a book with a series of photographs for each technique looks like the next best thing...

That is why making your own booklets with training notes is so useful, not only can you read them back, you also have to make them yourself!!

Making your own booklets with notes is a realy great training aid, IMHO better than some book that offers prefab standards and ideas.

I like books and pictures and videotapes, I just wouldnot advice them to a beginner.

Wayne
04-09-2002, 03:26 PM
I also am enjoying the comments since I too am a beginner at aikido. I have been making notes since I started in hopes of helping my brain and body remember what I practiced during class. For me, as well as other students I think, a book or books would provide a means of memory refresh during times when we cannot practice. Also, if I remember some of a technique, pictures may very well jog my meory as to what sensei demonstrated.

I agree with the style concerns but subtle differences won't matter since I'm not that good at the technique anyway.

As far as specific suggestions, I also enjoyed the beginner handbook. I asked a senior student and found out that my dojo is affiliated with Saotome Sensei. Thus, I decided that his two books (I forget the titles) would be good additions to my library. It seems to me that his versions of the fundamental techniques are probably what I will be learning and practicing and practicing. Ask around see if your organization's Shihan has books or videos. Also, check with your local library. Some other aikido books may have a good selection of stretching exercises that you can do at home in between practice sessions.

One more thing. I have enjoyed the "Aikido in America" and "Women in Aikido" books. They are each collections of interviews and may give you a feeling for some of the history and politics behind aikido.

Erik
04-09-2002, 03:31 PM
Originally posted by Kat.C
The style I am training in is aikikai.
Kat

LOL! That'll clear things up.

I'd say buy whatever (other than Aikido Tips and Tactics which no one should ever buy). The differences on a form level are really much less dramatic than everyone is making them out to be and you'll get inculcated into the teacher's style anyway by virtue of practicing it. I find the visual parts of most MA books almost useless anyway.

I second the Takemusu series of books. The techniques are clean and well presented in the one I have. Plus, the series goes into a fair amount of depth. Many books give you irimi nage, ikkyo and a couple of variations before calling it a day.

Bruce Baker
04-09-2002, 03:33 PM
I think that my original recommendations will stand, as they are USAF materials ... and even when scrutinized by other aikido organizations they hold up verywell.

If you can borrow them from people in your Aikikai to look at them, then you will know what works for you.

Of course, practice will be a lot more fun than karate, just go do it and it will happen.

Greg O'Connor does have two plainly written books for the student, and descriptive spirit of aikido, which are inexpensive, but first get the Yamada book, its pictures are quite simple, and I think most Aikikai's use it as reference with Yamada Sensei's 'power and the basics' video series.

I have been with both Yamada Sensei, and O'Connor Sensei many times. Should they come near you, go try a seminar, it will be fun.

Andy
04-09-2002, 03:43 PM
Originally posted by Bruce Baker
first get the Yamada book, its pictures are quite simple, and I think most Aikikai's use it as reference with Yamada Sensei's 'power and the basics' video series.
Nope. Your inexperience in aikido is showing again, Bruce.

giriasis
04-09-2002, 03:45 PM
I started looking at books as a beginner as well, while books are no substitute for training they do help a lot. If you are practicing Aikikai, Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere is really good. You don't have pictures but Ratti's drawings are very dynamic and indicate the flow and movement very well. I think the only difference in that book (based on Ki Society I believe) is that they interchange the names of iriminage and kokyunage, but the way the techniqes are described are similar.

I'm a visual learner, too, and when I can't get to the mat, books are a great supplement.

If you want to get some videos, ask your dojo mates and see which is best for you. In my school, the best video for beginners is Yamada's Power and the Basics Pt. 1, and Donovan Waite's Ukemi videos. (Really good for USAF-East folks)

In regards to Aikikai, there are different associations under that banner and different shihan that emphasize different aspects of aikido. Yamada, Chiba, Saotome, Saito are all Aikikai but they all differ in their approach to aikido. Based on who your instructor trained under should help you decide which videos or books to buy at first.


And for help just learning names check out some of the language sections on this site.

akiy
04-09-2002, 03:54 PM
Originally posted by giriasis
In regards to Aikikai, there are different associations under that banner and different shihan that emphasize different aspects of aikido. Yamada, Chiba, Saotome, Saito are all Aikikai but they all differ in their approach to aikido. Based on who your instructor trained under should help you decide which videos or books to buy at first.
I, too, consider "Aikikai" to more be an "umbrella" organization moreso than a way to identify someone's "stylistic" definition. Even just at Aikikai Hombu Dojo alone, you'll see differeing "styles" from Watanabe sensei to Endo sensei to Osawa sensei to Arikawa sensei.

So, once again, I'll repeat my recommendation to ask your teacher for suggested books and such (rather than just relying on "styles" or organizations).

-- Jun

Wayne
04-09-2002, 04:11 PM
Two more aikido-related suggestions for those who like to read fiction.

"Helm" by Stephen Gould is a terrific science fiction story. He also has three or four other books that I have enjoyed. Each time I re-read the book I notice something new in the aikido descriptions.

"Angry White Pyjamas" by Robert Twigger is a non-fiction account of the author's experience taking an intensive year-long course in Yoshinkan Aikido. It was fun to read but I probably won't read it again.

giriasis
04-09-2002, 04:21 PM
I consider "Aikikai" to more be an "umbrella" organization moreso than a way to identify someone's "stylistic" definition. Even just at Aikikai Hombu Dojo alone, you'll see differeing "styles" from Watanabe sensei to Endo sensei to Osawa sensei to Arikawa sensei.


Jun, I don't know if you were only trying to clarify what I was saying or that you think that I'm saying that Aikikai is a style?

My point is the same as yours, I just said it in a different way. To know who her instructor trained under she would have to ask him right? There is no need to repeat yourself. I was not saying otherwise.

If you were responding to her reference to Aikikai as a "style" then please quote her.

I apologize for being defensive, but I don't like being misunderstood. (If I am.)

akiy
04-09-2002, 04:27 PM
Originally posted by giriasis
Jun, I don't know if you were only trying to clarify what I was saying or that you think that I'm saying that Aikikai is a style?
I'm just adding on to what you said, Anne Marie. I wasn't disagreeing.

I've edited the post in hopes of making myself more clear. Hope it helps...

-- Jun

Kat.C
04-09-2002, 04:47 PM
Actually I did ask my sensei about books and he showed me Aikido & the Dynamic Sphere, I took a look at it but wasn't sure that it was what I was looking for. That was the only book he recommended though, and I was hoping for some other suggestions. Sorry, I should have mentioned this before, wasn't thinking. I will of course take another look at this book I did only get a quick glance. Thank you for the other suggestions and the videos are probably a good idea so I will look into that as well. Personally I would like to get help after class but there is a wrestling class right after aikido so that is not possible. Usually after karate class my husband and I would get to spend an extra half hour with sensei and I always learned alot in those sessions. And no, I'm not comparing aikido to karate, just circumstances.
Writing notes is definitely not my forte. Besides as I said I am a visual learner, I don't know if even my own notes would help me:rolleyes: Anyways, thank you again for the ideas, I will check out the items mentioned.
Kat
P.S Bruce, karate was alot of fun I enjoyed it immensely, and sensei used to push us hard, I loved it.


I nearly forgot to put this in; We are affilliated, through my sensei's sensei, to Yamada Sensei. Does that help?

guest1234
04-09-2002, 06:25 PM
Hey, Kat, so how was that first class, anyway?:)

I would join with those who are urging you NOT to buy a book of techniques. Buy a biography if you wish, or books on the philosophy or even poetry of Aikido, if you are really up for a mind-bending experience then there's one by Gleason Sensei that should make you go 'hmmmmm:confused: ', more approachable (to me at least) ones by Stevens or Saotome Sensei... but make sure they are in keeping with the way your sensei wants you to look at Aikido, or it will be hard on you as a beginner to figure out what to think.

But avoid technique books. There is a natural desire on the part of beginners to get a book to study up, so they are not so confused. But it will only confuse you more. Unless your sensei wrote the book, even if it is the same style, but certainly if it is from a different style, things will not be the same. Even if your sensei DID write the book, what he was showing in the book might not be what he wants to be teaching right now. The Shihan of my organization has made videos and books. Which have dutifully been committed to memory and retained as gospel by his students, so much so that when he demonstrates a technique at seminars, the great majority hop up and do not what he showed, but what's in the book/video. Makes me want to cry. Probably doesn't do much for him, either.

It is good you are a visual learner. Just watch what you are shown closely, and repeat it. But feeling it really is the best way to go, I think, just nothing compares. Pay attention to what your body feels when you are uke. Take notes or since you are visual, draw stick figures or diagrams.

I think the important thing for a beginner to learn is how to learn, and it's not from memorizing a set of pictures in a book, because those are rarely shown in class (Saito Sensei's books I will say are an exception, probably because of the Iwama kihon attitude)-- but unless you are in an Iwama dojo, they won't serve the purpose you're after.

I'd invest in a nice notebook to take to class, and fill it up with notes as quickly as possible.

JAD
04-09-2002, 08:40 PM
I'll agree with other reviewers concerning "Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere". It is a great starting point. Another good book, although I believe out of print at this point, is Koichi Tohei's classic "This Is Aikido". It is very visual and covers a lot of ground. Your Best bet is to scour the used book shops in your area. It is worth the effort.

PEACE!
JAD
:ki:

Kat.C
04-09-2002, 09:32 PM
Originally posted by ca
Hey, Kat, so how was that first class, anyway?:)

I would join with those who are urging you NOT to buy a book of techniques. Buy a biography if you wish, or books on the philosophy or even poetry of Aikido, if you are really up for a mind-bending experience then there's one by Gleason Sensei that should make you go 'hmmmmm:confused: ', more approachable (to me at least) ones by Stevens or Saotome Sensei... but make sure they are in keeping with the way your sensei wants you to look at Aikido, or it will be hard on you as a beginner to figure out what to think.

But avoid technique books. There is a natural desire on the part of beginners to get a book to study up, so they are not so confused. But it will only confuse you more. Unless your sensei wrote the book, even if it is the same style, but certainly if it is from a different style, things will not be the same. Even if your sensei DID write the book, what he was showing in the book might not be what he wants to be teaching right now. The Shihan of my organization has made videos and books. Which have dutifully been committed to memory and retained as gospel by his students, so much so that when he demonstrates a technique at seminars, the great majority hop up and do not what he showed, but what's in the book/video. Makes me want to cry. Probably doesn't do much for him, either.

It is good you are a visual learner. Just watch what you are shown closely, and repeat it. But feeling it really is the best way to go, I think, just nothing compares. Pay attention to what your body feels when you are uke. Take notes or since you are visual, draw stick figures or diagrams.

I think the important thing for a beginner to learn is how to learn, and it's not from memorizing a set of pictures in a book, because those are rarely shown in class (Saito Sensei's books I will say are an exception, probably because of the Iwama kihon attitude)-- but unless you are in an Iwama dojo, they won't serve the purpose you're after.

I'd invest in a nice notebook to take to class, and fill it up with notes as quickly as possible.

Hi Colleen, I posted my thoughts on my first aikido class in the Chit Chat forum, but in short it was alot of fun and even more confusing. Are there no basics? I miss my basics and kata.
I'm not looking to get a book so that I can memorize all the techniques, just to help me out with things that I get shown in class.
I was taught in karate not to get ahead of what sensei teaches me, it would be too confusing to try anyway. I just need some visual reminders of what we do. I wouldn't be able to figure out a technique from a book anyway I would need to have done it in class first, I am hoping for a book that can help me out when I get confused practising at home and I have a feeling that will happen alot. I am not in a rush though, I figured when I decided to start aikido that I would spend my first few months in utter confusion!
Right now I am content to work on my backward rolls (practised alot today but I don't think I improved any) and moving as we were shown, I spent most of the class off balance. I knew it would be different then what I had done but I was surprised at how much it differed.
Thanks for all the advice, I wish I could practice with you guys instead of just 'talking' to you here, bet I'd learn alot more. Oh well I have plenty of time to figure things out and I expect to enjoy the process.

guest1234
04-09-2002, 10:55 PM
Hi Kat,

I'll have to go check out chit chat... I have a bad habit of only checking out what is on the home page and then wandering off into cyber space.

Oh, there are plenty of basics... just depends on who is teaching as to what they are ;) ... all part of the grand plan to always keep us off balance and confused :confused:
Some styles and teachers stress things they want beginners to learn more than others, some dojos have beginners classes (which also can vary a lot in content), some just toss you in to sink or swim... but I'll put good money you'll do fine regardless.

Have fun with the rolls...:freaky: :freaky:

Kat.C
04-10-2002, 06:54 AM
Well Colleen, it was pretty much the sink or swim thing for us, My husband swam, I, well I didn't drown :rolleyes: . Aside from the few minutes one of the seniors spent teaching us backward rolls we did what the rest of the class was doing. Or atttempted to. Everyone was patient and helpful though, but they kept asking me if I was getting it!:eek: I thought that was quite funny, I mean it was my first class. Usually I just answered "not yet". I think I will be saying that for quite some time to come. Thanks for the encouragement.

Bruce Baker
04-10-2002, 07:58 AM
I was at Barnes and Noble in Cherry Hill, NJ a couple of weeks ago, and they had a very slim selection of Aikido books, but it was a good place to actually open the books and look at them. Although I think actually looking through one owned by a friend makes it a give in to purchase a book post haste.

A trip to the local book store might be your best bet.

Excuse me while I address Andy Russo who seems to be personally enamored with attacking me.

Since you are the master of these threads Andy, maybe you can explain for the rest of us the seven pillars of Aikido as out lined by John Stevens Sensei, and differences in the styles of Aikido as they relate to incorporating Judo, Jujitsu and Karate into each particular style? Why hitting a muscle leaves black and blue, while pressure points don't.

If you can't, then please grow up and get out into the world and learn what I am learning, continue to learn. Aikido contains more than meets the eye, or our teachers and shihans give to us in practice.

Sorry, had to do it. Stress ain't no good for Meniere's.

As for books, don't be in a hurry, one will catch your fancy and that will be your book.

thomson
04-10-2002, 08:16 AM
Kat, while I basically agree with everyone that you should check with your sensei and sempais, I don't agree that you should not pick up a book that shows techniques. I am also a beginner and the first book I bought was "Aikido" by Kisshomura Ueshiba, O'sensei's son and 2nd doshu. It helps me immensely to remember the techniques shown in class. BTW the style I practice is also under the aikikai "umbrella". Sarpy Aikido is a part Aikido Hawaii International under Robert Kubo shihan, a style very similar to the techniques in the book.

Sorry, but it was bugging me that the concensus seems to be "Stay away from technique books" and as a visual person also the books are nothing but help.

Mike :D

Kat.C
04-10-2002, 08:20 AM
Originally posted by Bruce Baker

Excuse me while I address Andy Russo who seems to be personally enamored with attacking me.

.
Personal attacks!:eek: I thought there were no attacks in aikido:D Where is all the harmony I keep reading about in these forums:confused: :D

Couldn't resist:rolleyes: I have noticed a bit of tension?:freaky: in some of the threads.

giriasis
04-10-2002, 08:33 AM
Originally posted by akiy

I'm just adding on to what you said, Anne Marie. I wasn't disagreeing.

I've edited the post in hopes of making myself more clear. Hope it helps...

-- Jun

No problem, I know I was defensive and I apologize for that. I just kind of went "huh?" when I read it.

Andy
04-10-2002, 10:15 AM
Originally posted by Bruce Baker
maybe you can explain for the rest of us the seven pillars of Aikido as out lined by John Stevens Sensei,
Nine. Go read Stevens's "The Philosophy of Aikido."
and differences in the styles of Aikido as they relate to incorporating Judo, Jujitsu and Karate into each particular style?
Yoseikan budo (Mochizuki) incorporates aikijujutsu, karate, judo, and kobudo; Mochizuki studied under Ueshiba, Kano, and Funakoshi. Nishio's aikido which includes elements from his training in iaido (7th dan), karate (6th dan), and judo (5th dan). Tomiki aikido has a lot of elements of judo as well with Tomiki himself having held a 7th dan. Morita's Nihon Goshin Aikido, although not having its roots with Ueshiba, contains elements of the above martial arts.

Should I go on?
Why hitting a muscle leaves black and blue, while pressure points don't.
Bruises are caused by capillaries rupturing under the skin. Any technique including "pressure point" (whatever) manipulation or even massage when done wrong will leave bruises.
If you can't, then please grow up and get out into the world and learn what I am learning, continue to learn. Aikido contains more than meets the eye, or our teachers and shihans give to us in practice.
Pot. Kettle. Black.

Oops. There goes your high horse. You better catch it so you can get back on it, child.

erikmenzel
04-10-2002, 10:44 AM
By Bruce Baker
As for books, don't be in a hurry, one will catch your fancy and that will be your book.

And yours was, let me have a wild guess,





Bluf your way into Aikido ??

:D :D :blush:

[putting on asbestus flame protection suit]

Kat.C
04-10-2002, 10:51 AM
My goodness, I never thought my book thread would get so interesting. Tell me, are you guys this gentle with your ukes?

erikmenzel
04-10-2002, 11:00 AM
My goodness, I never thought my book thread would get so interesting. Tell me, are you guys this gentle with your ukes?

Best thing to do, is come to the Netherlands and train with our club and find out for yourself.
Or, for me to come to your club and train there.

I can of course tell you that I am this nice 2 metres, 110 kilogrammes guy (transfering this to some weird non metric measure I leave to someone else), who is loved by everybody and everybody likes to train with, but then you just have to take my word for it.

Hope it can come to the first option one day, for that one allows for contact, friendship and learning!

Take care and train.

guest1234
04-10-2002, 12:10 PM
:eek: No, Kat, don't do it!!!:eek:

I swear, all Dutch are giants. Even the babies. Really. I lived there for three years and grade school kids dwarfed me. Must either be all the healthy milk or the bike riding...

Seriously, before Erik attacks, I loved my time there. Folks were big (even the US babies born there were big, we used to laugh about it), and I've never lived in a foreign country where we (US military) were so uniformly welcomed. Even the demonstrators (we had a few, the Dutch are also the social conscious of the world) were uniformly friendly and polite.
My last year there I marched in Neijmegen (boy, it's been a while, hope I got that right:confused: ), and the only thing keeping me going the last 25 miles was the cheerful encouragement from all the folks lining the sidewalks.

Kat.C
04-10-2002, 12:13 PM
Well I am only 5'2" so I don't need to go anywhere at all to be dwarved!

Ummm, Colleen, you said "the last 25 miles", how far did you have to march?:eek:

erikmenzel
04-10-2002, 12:57 PM
Originally posted by ca
:eek: No, Kat, don't do it!!!:eek:

:D :D :D :D
But if you do, you will be welcome!!!:cool:


I swear, all Dutch are giants. Even the babies. Really. I lived there for three years and grade school kids dwarfed me. Must either be all the healthy milk or the bike riding...

This is true, the Dutch are (statisticaly) the tallest on the world. And for your comfort, I am big for dutch standards.


Seriously, before Erik attacks, I loved my time there. Folks were big (even the US babies born there were big, we used to laugh about it), and I've never lived in a foreign country where we (US military) were so uniformly welcomed. Even the demonstrators (we had a few, the Dutch are also the social conscious of the world) were uniformly friendly and polite.
My last year there I marched in Neijmegen (boy, it's been a while, hope I got that right:confused: ), and the only thing keeping me going the last 25 miles was the cheerful encouragement from all the folks lining the sidewalks.

Glad to here you enjoyed your time in the Netherlands and have such good memories.
The 4-days march at Nijmegen is indeed very famous and considered special for all the military from various countries that participate (btw, did you have to do the 31 miles every day or the 40 miles??)

JPT
04-10-2002, 04:13 PM
I found Aikido, Traditional Art & Modern Sport by Brian Bagot very useful when I first started.
:square: :circle: :triangle:

guest1234
04-10-2002, 04:54 PM
Oh, great, now's a great time to find I was lied to... they told me it was 25 miles a day for 4 days with a 40 pound pack (plus my medical supplies), but all the weights and distances were in km and kg, so I was at the mercy of the organizers... We had an Air Force team (I dragged one teammate the back 12 miles--or whatever it was--the first day, by God we were going to finish...) and the US Army teams thought we were crazy.

Met many nice groups of other military, became separated from my group the third day and ended up with what sounded like Dutch marines (didn't realize there was such a thing, if I understood them right) for a time. Started out behind a team from the UK one morning who had bagpipes for the first mile or so...

Hardest part was the last part, from official end of the march/tent area through town center...my team had decided we should wear our 'blues' at this point, and my feet really rebelled at changing boots for pumps at this point.

So...how about you, have you been that crazy? I know the civilians had a separate route...

thomson
04-10-2002, 05:07 PM
Kat,
I just thought of something, that may be helpful. Try to get a hold of tapes of seminars put on by people in your association. Great visual aids, and most importantly, won't confuse you on styles. I have a tape from the last time Kubo sensei was in town, and on it is the sandan test for our sensei's son. Watching his test helped me remember the points in the jo kata I had forgot.

Hope that helps! :D
Mike

erikmenzel
04-10-2002, 05:10 PM
Originally posted by ca
Dutch marines (didn't realize there was such a thing, if I understood them right)

60% of our country is below sealevel and more then 50% of our country is bordered by sea and still you didnt expect us to have marines??? :freaky:

So...how about you, have you been that crazy?

No, I havent, although I ran a dozen of marathons, which probably equaly qualifies as brainrot :p :p :p

guest1234
04-10-2002, 10:10 PM
Sorry:o

But all those guys in uniform (Air Force, I will admit) with pony tails and earrings that made me think military service might be not quite the same as in the US :D

marathons! yes, you win the crazy award:eek:

Bronson
04-10-2002, 11:44 PM
Hey all,
While we're on the subject of books...
I'm looking for martial arts books from any style (karate, judo, aikido, kungfu...) that deal with the authors experiences in learning/training, or teaching their art. I'm not looking for any techniques, I actually prefer if there are no pictures. If you've read Autumn Lightning or Persimmon Wind by Dave Lowry, or Moving Zen by C.W. Nicol, or In Search of the Warrior Spirit by Richard Heckler then you probably know the kind of book I'm looking for. More of a story of what they went through and what they might have learned about themselves from the experience.

Thanks,
Bronson

Andy
04-12-2002, 10:37 AM
Originally posted by Andy
Oops. There goes your high horse. You better catch it so you can get back on it, child.
Aww, Bruce. No response to all of my answers to your questions which "proved" you were so superior to everyone else? Sorry to see your bubble bursting, child.