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Carrie Campbell
10-15-2009, 12:49 PM
As a new brown belt, what expectations do you have for a student wearing a brown belt (2nd or 1st kyu)?

Adam Huss
10-15-2009, 01:05 PM
Just some generalizations...certainly doesn't apply to everyone or just aikido:

-Stay humble, from time to time certain people tend to step out of their lane when getting around the 1st kyu-shodan level. Maybe not intentionally, but it can happen.

-Your technique should be getting pretty effective and you should have a lot of fun doing dynamic technique. This is great, but don't always train with dohai-senpai...don't forget to work with beginners as much as you can! You can learn a lot from working with people coming in the dojo 'off the street.'

-Set a good example for the dojo. Be the first to help clean, run up for uke when sensei is teaching, display the best etiquette you can. Remember, kohai will be looking up to you at all times...will likely be confused...so therefore will mimic everything they see.

*and don't disappear from the dojo after your shodan!

all the best and congrats!
Adam

Carrie Campbell
10-15-2009, 01:30 PM
Thanks, Adam. I'll try.

ramenboy
10-15-2009, 02:19 PM
hey carrie congrats!!!!!

practice more. teach less.

i'm sure obrecht sensei will tell you how much tohei sensei DIDN't talk during class. so our favorite advice from sempai was 'shut up and train'

aikidoc
10-15-2009, 06:30 PM
At ikkyu or nikyu, you have likely been exposed to a lot of different techniques. It is now time to start working on owning them. You will spend the longest time in these ranks honing and refining your skills.

Adam Huss
10-15-2009, 10:40 PM
hey carrie congrats!!!!!

practice more. teach less.

i'm sure obrecht sensei will tell you how much tohei sensei DIDN't talk during class. so our favorite advice from sempai was 'shut up and train'

I remember one night one of our senior students was teaching and he had us be silent the whole night and focus on 'feeling out' the technique.

ramenboy
10-16-2009, 03:00 PM
I remember one night one of our senior students was teaching and he had us be silent the whole night and focus on 'feeling out' the technique.

ha! yup... i remember being in class with gilbert james sensei... same thing. not much talking. alot of being drilled into the mat though :P

Adam Huss
10-16-2009, 05:05 PM
ha! yup... i remember being in class with gilbert james sensei... same thing. not much talking. alot of being drilled into the mat though :P

Sensei James Gilbert sounds very familiar....

Azz
10-20-2009, 07:38 AM
As someone who is about to go there this is great to hear. Congrats on your acheivement :)

Carrie Campbell
10-21-2009, 09:31 AM
As someone who is about to go there this is great to hear. Congrats on your acheivement :)

Thanks, Sandy. Good luck to you! :)

Expectations I've gathered so far from my instructors include:

Running up to practice with the newest students.
When nage, being relaxed and moving with hips/body w/o muscle, and being in control/being able to move slowly, methodically, yet smooth.

Carrie Campbell
10-21-2009, 09:44 AM
Remember, kohai will be looking up to you at all times...will likely be confused...so therefore will mimic everything they see.

Adam, Sandy:
I hadn't realized this before, but thought I'd check it out. It's true. It's weird. It seemed I was being watched on both sides. All new (0-2 years) students and those that hadn't been practicing with a particular teacher for awhile (we have 3 teachers that teach different days) were watching and following me. If I stretched to the left, so did they. I've decided to ignore the watchful eyes, focus mine on the instructor, and just do my best.

Adam Huss
10-21-2009, 01:31 PM
One interesting story related to this is some Yoshinkan practitioners who do certain throws slightly bent forward. They thought this was the way you were supposed to do it, even though it is contrary to most Yoshinkan principles, because that is how they saw Shioda Sensei doing it. But in actuality Shioda Sensei was bent over due to an old back injury.

Likewise there was some contention years ago as to how to do the Aikikai kata Kiri Kaeshi (bokken kata II) in the AAA. Toyoda Sensei used to do it by moving side to side, rather than forward, and that is the way many satellite dojo practiced it. At a seminar, someone asked for clarification and Toyoda Sensei said he did it side to side because of the layout of his dojo didn't allow for much forward and backward movement but that the correct way was to advance forward and that he was wondering why everyone was doing it wrong by going side to side!