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View Full Version : Irimi Nage Omote, turning the hand over


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Mike Hamer
02-02-2007, 10:05 PM
Im talking about after you've taken uke's center and you bring your arm over him making him fall. My Sensei teaches us to turn the hand over, thumb down, as you do this. I asked if there was a specific reason for this and he said it has to do with making the technique flow smoothly, but didnt really go into much detail. Does anyone else do this also? We were practicing from gyako(sp?) hamni stance with a katata katata tori handgrip.

Lan Powers
02-02-2007, 10:14 PM
Puts the more powerful extensor muxcles into play. I have been told.
Lan

Lyle Laizure
02-11-2007, 01:43 PM
Ask your uke if he/she feels a difference.

Janet Rosen
02-11-2007, 03:21 PM
its the shape of extension.
makes not a whit of difference whether you/your teacher expresses this as extending ki or as physiology (engaging the extensor muscles) or a metaphor (picture a ... <insert image here>) the effect will be the same.
if you have the hand turned the other way, you are not extending in a wave, you are hitting or pushing into your partner. inow, that may be very martially effective <wicked grin> but it is not what the technique is about as usually taught in aikido.

aikidoc
02-11-2007, 04:30 PM
actually flexor muscles.

David Humm
02-11-2007, 08:00 PM
Im talking about after you've taken uke's center and you bring your arm over him making him fall. My Sensei teaches us to turn the hand over, thumb down, as you do this. I asked if there was a specific reason for this and he said it has to do with making the technique flow smoothly, but didnt really go into much detail. Does anyone else do this also? We were practicing from gyako(sp?) hamni stance with a katata katata tori handgrip.The rotational movement which you describe with your hand is (or should be IMHO) an important part of many techniques seen in aikido.

The rotation is often referred to as "asagao" when the fingers of the hand are open and extended, if one were to make exactly the same action with both hands, you'd be (metaphorically) mimicking a flower of Japan known as "morning glory" which opens with a rotational or spiral motion.

The extension of the fingers of one's hands allows for dynamic tension in the forearms without rigidity, essentially creating the so called 'unbendable arm' one's arm has a natural curve even when straightened (unless you really stretch) this shape is very useful and indeed powerful when utilised in waza. Essentially multiple circles (or rotations) within circles of movement.

Regards

Janet Rosen
02-11-2007, 09:47 PM
actually flexor muscles.
Interesting. The way I was taught to do it definitely uses primarily the triceps, which are extensors.
The way I later started doing it also makes use of principles of Pilates so that the lats are engaged before the triceps.
John, I'm curious to know what flexors you are engaging?

Mike Hamer
02-12-2007, 01:57 AM
Thanks everybody for the advice.