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dps
05-29-2006, 08:24 PM
I would like to know some of the advice that your senseis have given you. It does not have to be the "best advice' but advice that has had a positive effect on you. If you could also please say how long ago the advice was given.

My first sensei, approximately 20 years ago, told me, " You ask too many questions, just shut up and do it." This was before the Nike commercial.

David

mathewjgano
05-29-2006, 08:38 PM
I would like to know some of the advice that your senseis have given you. It does not have to be the "best advice' but advice that has had a positive effect on you. If you could also please say how long ago the advice was given.

My first sensei, approximately 20 years ago, told me, " You ask too many questions, just shut up and do it." This was before the Nike commercial.

David
LOL! I think both of my teachers would say that to me too! My sensei back in the states has given me advice by way of a story. This is meant to show the attitude of someone who wants to make budo a way of life I think.
Our lineage comes from a family style of jujutsu. The father of my sensei's sensei was close to death and his son didn't want to train so he could stay with him instead. His father told him he must train. When he came back he had passed away.
This has always struck me deeply. On one hand, a day of training seems paltry compared to the final moments of a loved one's life. On the other hand, considering a person who has lived a full life and the dedication one might want to have with regard to continuous self-improvement/refinement, I can see how it might be considered more important to focus on living life as best you can, even in the face of death.
After the death of my own father, this story has held deeper meaning. For quite a while I became somewhat frozen...I stopped moving forward in life. Now, I think it's important we always strive in that forwardly direction; toward positive growth, even when faced with the threat of profoundly sad or otherwise negative things.
Gambatte!
Matt

Ron Tisdale
05-30-2006, 10:23 AM
I think the advice that sticks with me and means the most to me right now is "know your body". In light of discussions here and elsewhere in relation to "body skills", unusual strength, different kinds of conditioning (things that you typically don't get from weight training)...this statement from my teacher in a style which has a very strict outward form and very rigorous training weighs on me a lot. He didn't say "know uke's body", he didn't say "learn about form", he didn't say "watch me", he said "you have to know your own body", and he's actually repeated this several times. In relation to technique, and in relation to healing injuries, and in relation to training as you get older.

Another teacher (same organization) recently stressed "relax as much as possible while maintaining the form". I have always found form and relaxation as two polar opposites. I would go one place to train in a relaxed manner and another to train form. I would try to bring the two together and fail a lot.

Recently I have had much more sucsess on both fronts...getting to know my body and getting to relax inside the form. Lot of work left to do... The strange thing is that I don't think I am hearing anything new...just listening more now.

Best,
Ron

SeiserL
05-30-2006, 10:30 AM
"No. Again."

Eric Webber
05-30-2006, 10:41 AM
"You choose to be offended."

"No one can 'make' you angry."

He understood perspective and personal responsibility in an amazing way.

billybob
05-30-2006, 03:23 PM
When I started to catch on to judo as a kid; doing stuff the easy way instead of struggling I was frequently at a loss for words. My Sensei would ask what technique I had just done (during randori free play). She did this for a period of weeks, and I dutifully answered each time. The time I could not answer, and sheepishly admitted 'i don't know', rather than being upset she smiled widely and said, "Very good, continue."

Nonverbal Sensei.

dave

ksy
06-01-2006, 10:35 PM
LOL! I think both of my teachers would say that to me too! My sensei back in the states has given me advice by way of a story. This is meant to show the attitude of someone who wants to make budo a way of life I think.
Our lineage comes from a family style of jujutsu. The father of my sensei's sensei was close to death and his son didn't want to train so he could stay with him instead. His father told him he must train. When he came back he had passed away.
This has always struck me deeply. On one hand, a day of training seems paltry compared to the final moments of a loved one's life. On the other hand, considering a person who has lived a full life and the dedication one might want to have with regard to continuous self-improvement/refinement, I can see how it might be considered more important to focus on living life as best you can, even in the face of death.
After the death of my own father, this story has held deeper meaning. For quite a while I became somewhat frozen...I stopped moving forward in life. Now, I think it's important we always strive in that forwardly direction; toward positive growth, even when faced with the threat of profoundly sad or otherwise negative things.
Gambatte!
Matt

hey matt, yes, thanks for reminding me. focus on living life, even in the face of death. cheers!