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Adam Huss
03-26-2006, 06:54 PM
Well I've decided that I am going to move to Japan. I want to get a little different perspective on life from another cultures point of view...do something different. Ideally, if I could find a good teacher, I would love to be uchideshi. But if anything, I wouldn't mind just working somewhere and, of course, training. I would imagine that there are people on this site that have done this before. I'm trying to pull as many resources as I can back home, but I would love advice from anyone who has actually been uchideshi in Japan before. I figured this would be a good starting point...asking you all, supposing that writting a letter of inquiry to someone like Parker Amos Sensei, Viol John Sensei, or Lowry David Sensei would be somewhat too direct, as I have no relationship with those gentlemen (those are just people, off the top of my head, that have done this before).
Thanks so much for any help you all can give me!
Osu!

neb1979
03-26-2006, 07:11 PM
I have never been to Japan but would love to go and live there as well.

Good luck on your journey and am sure you will enjoy the experience.

Cheers
Ben :)

rundaheza
04-12-2006, 02:50 AM
Hello Adam

I have never been an uchidechi but I live in Japan and practice Aikido 3-4 times a week. I could practice everyday if I wanted to because my sensei teaches everyday. Belonging to a any club or extracurricular activity in Japan is somewhat different than in North America. Social cohesion is important so often there are additional social and club-related activities other than just practice. There is a lot of opportunity to learn about Japanese culture this way which in turn will help you learn about Aikido.

If you can't be an uchidechi my advice is to try and find a dojo that you are interested in, and a sensei that you can communicate with, and then support yourself with an English Teaching job. Do you speak Japanese? Don't assume your sensei will speak English. Do some research about dojos and then look at companies you can work at in the area. Companies such as Nova or Aeon employ native English speakers to teach English in Japan and have branches in many urban centers.

Good luck

Simon White
05-05-2006, 06:28 AM
Great, that's exactly my question.

We will most likely be going to Japan in the spring, and I guess I'll start with an intensive language training regime. Probably that would be good time to find a dojo, and then I can teach English as you suggest to slow down the outflow of money...

Can anyone recommend a friendly Dojo, I guess in Tokyo, that would take on a heavy beginner? My career so far has been heavy, so I have not been able to put the hours into Aikido - I'd need a dojo known for its patience where I could really make a solid start.

Apologies for rambling, but any and all advice welcome please.

Hanna B
05-05-2006, 07:02 AM
Can anyone recommend a friendly Dojo, I guess in Tokyo, that would take on a heavy beginner?
Kobayashi Dojo is known for friendliness, so if you want the aikido dojo to be friendly and a bit social I think it is a good choice.
http://www.cup.com/kobayashi-dojo/english/index.html
Igarashi dojo
http://home.att.ne.jp/moon/igarashidojo/english/english.html
is in the same line of aikido. Out of my personal aikido taste I would maybe suggest Igarashi sensei first, but I think all his dojos are a bit outside of Tokyo and I suppose geography will have importance - Tokyo is huge. Anyhow, with these two related lines of dojos you have over 30 places in the Tokyo area and outside Tokyo to choose from. As a relative beginner I think you should forget about the uchideshi idea, the uchideshi program is hard on the body and really meant for advanced students. I am sure you will find the regular classes enough.

Jory Boling
05-05-2006, 08:10 AM
Can anyone recommend a friendly Dojo, I guess in Tokyo, that would take on a heavy beginner?

I wouldn't be too stressed out about finding a friendly dojo. When I first moved here, last January, all 5 or 6 of the dojos I visited were most welcoming. And none of them spoke English. The one I finally settled on doesn't speak English, either.

Jory

Simon White
05-16-2006, 06:09 AM
Thanks Hanna, Jory -

I wouldn't go the Uchi Deshi route anyway I don't think - it would be too much. Solid regular practice would be enough for me as I need to get into shape at the same time. I'll look into the dojos you suggest soon, as geography is an issue and I'm not yet even certain where in JP we'll end up. Nice to hear they were all so friendly, that relaxes me a bit.

I'll post more over the next couple of months as I find things out and the plans become more solid. Please keep the advice coming and tell me if it ggets too much!

Simon

Robert Cheshire
06-01-2006, 08:52 AM
David Orange on this board has lived in Japan and has been an Uchi Deshi. While I don't agree with all of his points of view on things he has done it and would be a good source for you to use.

There is also an article by Patrick Auge on Aikido Journal (somewhere) and on his site at www.yoseikanbudo.com that talks about this very thing.

batemanb
06-01-2006, 09:33 AM
Can anyone recommend a friendly Dojo, I guess in Tokyo, that would take on a heavy beginner? My career so far has been heavy, so I have not been able to put the hours into Aikido - I'd need a dojo known for its patience where I could really make a solid start.


Hi Simon, I lived in Tokyo for two years, it depends where you will stay, but my old dojo is the Honcho Dojo in Nakano Shinbashi (near Shinjuku). Nojima sensei is well worth studying with, and Sugiura sensei speaks very good English. If you think you will be local and want further details I can put you in contact with Sugiura sensei.


rgds

Bryan

Hardware
06-19-2006, 09:09 PM
I agree with the others who suggested teaching English as a way to pay the bills. Your visa will be another issue...

STUDENT VISA - often used by people who come here to train at a specific dojo however they aren't allowed to work under this visa.

WORKING VISA - in order to apply for this visa you would need to be hired by an employer in advance and sponsored by same.

VISITOR VISA - Good for 90 days. You could come here on the visitor visa but you wouldn't be allowed to work. Once you found employment, then the employer could sponsor you and you'd have to apply for the working visa. I guess the application process would take about a month and technically you'd have to leave the country and then return once the working visa was approved.

WORKING HOLIDAY VISA - good for one year. There's an upper age limit on this one (probably mid-30's) but I'm pretty sure you're young enough. This allows for employment.

Do it while you're young and don't have career, family and other obligations back home!

Gabriel Weiszman
06-19-2006, 11:42 PM
I was in Japan from august untill november on 2004 .I used to trian mainly at Hombu Dojo but a friend of mine introduced me to Endo Sensei´s group .They train every sunday at Gakushuin University .My japanese = 0 but even with this little handicap I found the group to be very welcoming specially Endo Sensei .At night I used to work as door man in a night club in Roppongi .I wouldn´t say it was the perfect job but it helped me to get some money and still have time to train .Hope this little info.can help you .
PS if you get a "decent job " save a spot for me , I might be back to Japan again this year .

aikispike
06-20-2006, 10:19 PM
Simon,

Go check out the Yoshinkan Honbu when you get there. There are English classes every morning at 8:30. In regular classes they seperate the beginners from the regular students - so there is not too much pressure on you.

Michael



Can anyone recommend a friendly Dojo, I guess in Tokyo, that would take on a heavy beginner? My career so far has been heavy, so I have not been able to put the hours into Aikido - I'd need a dojo known for its patience where I could really make a solid start.

aikispike
06-20-2006, 10:29 PM
Well I've decided that I am going to move to Japan. I want to get a little different perspective on life from another cultures point of view...do something different. Ideally, if I could find a good teacher, I would love to be uchideshi.
Osu!

Adam,

You list the Chudokan, and listed Parker Sensei - so I suppose you do Yoshinkan.

The closest think to uchideshi in Tokyo that I know of is the senshusei program. You should look into it. I think people have varying opinions of the course, especially having read AWP. But it is the most intense aikido you can do in a year; and an awsome experience.

Spike

David Orange
06-22-2006, 07:27 PM
Simon,

Go check out the Yoshinkan Honbu when you get there. There are English classes every morning at 8:30. In regular classes they seperate the beginners from the regular students - so there is not too much pressure on you.

Michael

Yes, actually. Shioda Sensei (the younger) was very friendly and kind when I visited his dojo. I would recommend him, certainly.

David