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Old 11-27-2008, 07:15 AM   #101
raul rodrigo
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Let me pose a historical question to the MAC members reading this thread, because frankly I too am puzzled by it. Sensei Camar and his MAC dojo seems to have been the sole Hombu representative in this country from 1964 until sometime before 1981, when the baton of Hombu affiliation was apparently passed to the Pilipinas Aikido Propagation Association led by Johnny Tenegra and Robert Soliven. (See Loreto Torres's post on the first page of this thread.) It seems that PAPA and MAC may have had common roots at some point, but Tenegra and Soliven took the organization in another direction and MAC from that point on was apparently not part of the picture in terms of relating to Hombu. PAPA was then the sole Hombu representative from the early 1980s until 1992, when a second federation was formed.

Is my reading of history accurate? If so, how and why did that happen? Does this event, the shift of Hombu affiliation, have anything to do with the decision of MAC thereafter not to attend any seminars taught by the visiting Hombu shihan?

I ask because I am not a member of PAPA and I entered the local aikido scene in 1996, way after these events took place. At the time there were two Filipino federations, PAPA and Aikido Philippines. My dojo was a member of Aikido Philippines. I have some friends in PAPA but they too started in aikido way after 1981.

I understand that some people may see this question as raking up the past, but I am truly curious about what came before.

best,

R

Last edited by raul rodrigo : 11-27-2008 at 07:20 AM.
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Old 11-27-2008, 09:00 AM   #102
Mannix Moya
 
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Quote:
Enrique Antonio Reyes wrote: View Post
Hi Mannix, I have heard personally from one of our seniors that the 8th Dan was signed by Tohei. I am guessing (this is just me now) just right before he formed his own group.
Hi Iking,

Given the chronology of events that I have seen here, I doubt it. Its a fact that Camar Sensei didn't join the Ki Society.

And granted that its true, then the dan grade didn't come from hombu.
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Old 11-27-2008, 09:01 AM   #103
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Quote:
Raul Rodrigo wrote: View Post
Let me pose a historical question to ...
I started learning aikido in 2001 and I'm not a direct student of Camar Sensei, so I'm curious as well.
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Old 11-27-2008, 09:16 AM   #104
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Iking, if that were true, then Omar Camar sensei would have started aikido in 1966 and then gotten to hachidan before 1974, which is when Tohei left the Aikikai. It's hard enough to get to nidan in eight years, but 8th dan is really a stretch.

To go back to my question: in an earlier post, Arnold Mina made a reference to "dojo politics" leading to some kind of break between Camar sensei and Johnny Tenegra. But that doesn't answer the question of why the Hombu affiliation went with Tenegra and did not stay with the MAC.

Last edited by raul rodrigo : 11-27-2008 at 09:20 AM.
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Old 11-27-2008, 11:37 AM   #105
Enrique Antonio Reyes
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Quote:
Raul Rodrigo wrote: View Post
Iking, if that were true, then Omar Camar sensei would have started aikido in 1966 and then gotten to hachidan before 1974, which is when Tohei left the Aikikai. It's hard enough to get to nidan in eight years, but 8th dan is really a stretch.

To go back to my question: in an earlier post, Arnold Mina made a reference to "dojo politics" leading to some kind of break between Camar sensei and Johnny Tenegra. But that doesn't answer the question of why the Hombu affiliation went with Tenegra and did not stay with the MAC.
Raul/Mannix,

I didn't say it was fact. It's just something I was told and something I guessed...

Hi Raul, can't really help you much with the history nor with the decisions of the MAC leadership in the past actually even the present (as I am not really "active" as of the moment)

See you guys around.

One-Aiki,

Iking
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Old 11-27-2008, 05:58 PM   #106
ken zen ichii
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Konichiwa Goldsbury San,

Please accept my humble apology for misspelling your name. Sumimasen deshita.

I dont know how to explain this to you but it is true that some Aiki Do Dojo's here in northern Kanto Area uses the term kyoushi. I did not say that the Aiki Kai is using it as in general. About the term kyoushi not being used in Japanese martial arts, I have been practicing Wado Karate Do (Wado, which means Way of Peace and Harmony) is a style of karate but circular in motion unlike other karate school which are linear karate, Almost all karate schools has their roots from China via Okinawa but Wado is a descendant of Shindo Yoshin Ryu Jujitsu and uses not one's owns power but instead to disbalance an opponent.) since I was 5 years old Inow hold the rank of Roku Dan and I am a Renshi.
In Karate, We use the term Kyoushi and also a friend of mine who is an apprentice Kendo Instructor also uses the term Kyoushi in their Dojo.

(#92, About respect, Here in Japan, it is disrespectful to address a person with a kyoshi grade as Sensei regardless of affiliations, regardless of art (Karate Do, Ken Do, Iai Do Etc.) It is disrespectful to call them by names alone.) The ones in bold letters, I had an error while typing the words,it should be, It is disrespectful to address a person with kyoshi grade regardless of what he is teaching, by his name and the word Sensei must always be mentioned after His/Her name. I noticed this now so I have to put a correction on it.

Regarding the political problems of the Aiki Do Ka's in the Philippines, My mother is a Filipina and she met my Dad in the Mid 1950's in the Philippines. (My Dad was one of the 3 people responsible for the practice of Wado Karate in the Philippines.)
So that makes me a Nikkei Jin and because I am partly Filipino, it bothers me when I see Filipinos having misunderstanding about this matter. If MAC says they are this and they are that, that is because they believe that they are this and they are that, Now the affiliated ones, If you know that you are the affiliated ones, why not just let it be that way and stop pressing the other groups that they are not affiliated. Maybe if you all just keep quite and be harmonious with each other who knows, maybe Aiki Do Philippines will become a one umbrella organization in the future.

I do believe that this is all for me now. Its been nice having a conversations with all of you guys and keep up your training.

Goldsbury Sensei, Domo arigatougozaimashita. I will call you when I go back to Hiroshima. I usually stay at the Hiroshima Intelligent Hotel. I am now an Aiki Do Deshi and maybe a Sempai to Kohai kind of talk will be good over a cup of coffee at Starbucks.

Ira Watanabe
Chief Instructor
Ken Zen Ichii Wado Kai Karate Do
Nasu Dojo, Tochigi Ken, Japan

Last edited by ken zen ichii : 11-27-2008 at 06:12 PM.
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Old 11-28-2008, 07:02 AM   #107
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Komban wa, Watanabe San,

Many thanks for your mail. I would like to make one more point, with reference to the part of your post quoted below.

It surprises me that different aikido organizations in a country cannot even talk to each other in a civilized manner--and I do not mean just in South-east Asia. (I will not name names, but I am not thinking of the Philippines here.) Some countries in Europe are just as bad. Japan is the same, especially in Hiroshima, for here it is a case of different dojo in the same local city. So I would not suggest being harmonious by keeping quiet, but being harmonious by being ready to converse with each other in an atmosphere of mutual respect.In my experience, umbrella organizations succeed, not because of silence, but because of mutual respect for a 'protocol of civilized conversation', which leads to mutual trust and a readiness to forget the old slights and insults.

Quote:
Ira Watanabe wrote: View Post
Regarding the political problems of the Aiki Do Ka's in the Philippines, My mother is a Filipina and she met my Dad in the Mid 1950's in the Philippines. (My Dad was one of the 3 people responsible for the practice of Wado Karate in the Philippines.)
So that makes me a Nikkei Jin and because I am partly Filipino, it bothers me when I see Filipinos having misunderstanding about this matter. If MAC says they are this and they are that, that is because they believe that they are this and they are that, Now the affiliated ones, If you know that you are the affiliated ones, why not just let it be that way and stop pressing the other groups that they are not affiliated. Maybe if you all just keep quite and be harmonious with each other who knows, maybe Aiki Do Philippines will become a one umbrella organization in the future.

Ira Watanabe
Chief Instructor
Ken Zen Ichii Wado Kai Karate Do
Nasu Dojo, Tochigi Ken, Japan
I very rarely meet those with whom I correspond on Aikiweb. So I look forward to meeting you soon.

Best wishes,

PAG

P A Goldsbury
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Old 11-28-2008, 08:08 AM   #108
raul rodrigo
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Dear Professor Goldsbury:

I agree that keeping quiet is probably not the optimal strategy for these situations. It allows old wounds to fester and tends to keep aikidoka in their own ghettoes. I have a feeling in fact, that some of the strong reactions directed at the affiliated aikidoka on this thread (Rommel Miel, Graeme, myself) have less to do with what we are actually saying, but from people reading into our statements some motivations and intentions that stem from incidents 20 or 30 years ago that we know nothing about and have nothing to do with. (Hence my question above, post 101, about the roots of the disharmony between PAPA and MAC.) There are apparently "old slights and insults" in the Philippine aikido world, as you say, that I am not aware of but which are still potent. But keeping quiet, as Ira suggests, will just maintain the mutual misunderstanding.

I am all for an atmosphere of mutual respect. I think I have tried to keep to a civil level of discourse in this thread. If I haven't achieved that, then my apologies to all concerned.

best,

R

Last edited by raul rodrigo : 11-28-2008 at 08:11 AM.
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Old 11-29-2008, 12:04 AM   #109
ken zen ichii
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Konichiwa,

I think Rodrigo San misundestood when I mentioned keep quite.
Being quite doesn't mean that you have to "keep your mouth shut"
but instead try to speak or have a conversation that will be able to solve the current situation. Maybe, you guys dont notice this but all of you are just trying to insult each other, affiliated or not you are all Aiki Do Ka's, and all of you came from the same roots in one way or another. If the leaders of all the groups do not want to talk why not you, the younger generations try to start solving it by at least trying to meet with each other and having a friendly conversation. Some independent members are doing cross training with the affiliated ones to learn, didn't
it occurred to the affiliated ones that they may also learn something from the independent ones.

Domo, Sitsureishimashita.
Watanabe yori.
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Old 11-29-2008, 07:54 AM   #110
raul rodrigo
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Ira-san:

Perhaps the younger aikidoka are in fact doing that kind of process right now. Perhaps our presence on this website is part of that process. Just the other week, I was in Iloilo where I got in contact with an unaffiliated dojo, whose people I like (like Jack Tentia) and whose late sensei, Francisco Valencia, deserved respect. I wasn't able to train with them on this trip due to unavoidable circumstances but I fully intend to return several times in the next few months and I would like to take classes with Jack and Carlo and the rest of them.

My dojo mates and I have taken some classes under a Yoshinkan Hombu shidoin. My federation mates and I have taken classes from Hitohiro Saito of the Iwama Shuren group. One sensei has trained with an instructor from the Shudokan/Tomiki Hombu. We have never said that the Aikikai is all that we need to understand aikido. Even cross training in judo has been very helpful to us.

In short, Ira-san, please try to understand where I am coming from. I think you have a certain preconceived notion of what I am and what I am trying to do. My getting in touch with people like Jack and Iking and Mannix is part of my own attempt to get to know the other side of Philippine aikido better. I hope that my posts on this thread are ultimately about getting some Filipino aikidoka closer together, not further apart.

best regards,

RAUL

Last edited by raul rodrigo : 11-29-2008 at 07:58 AM.
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Old 11-29-2008, 04:40 PM   #111
ken zen ichii
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Konichiwa,

Well in that case Rodrigo San, You have may support and respect to your way. It is good that you are trying to mingle with them. About Camar Sensei's grade, maybe it would be better if we will try to know him better first before we question his grades, know his reasons for it, maybe He meant 8th Dan as his grade as awarded by other group and his Dojo is still using the Aiki kai way as style of training.
I don't know Camar Sensei that much and as I have said before, I can't tell that I know him personally because it is unfortunate that it has not reached that level. I would really love to meet Him again and know him better. But based upon the words that I heard and about the things and efforts that he did for the development of Aiki Do in the Philippines, I think the old man deserves a kind of respect any Sensei deserves.
I am a Roku Dan in Wado Karate Do, but because I believe that Aiki Do is a beautiful art I am willing to go back to zero and start again and practice Aikido wherein in fact I am now an Aiki Do Deshi here in my area.
Oh and one thing, do not put - in between the name and the san, It should be Ira San and not Ira-San, actually it should be Watanabe San as the way Goldsbury Sensei addressed me but in my case, my first name Ira will do but not with other Japanese.
Btw. Rodrigo San, How old are you? If you don't mind me asking.

Godspeed,
Ira Watanabe
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Old 11-29-2008, 06:14 PM   #112
raul rodrigo
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Gomen nasai, Watanabe san. My mistake.

I am 43. I have been training for only 12 years.

best,

RAUL
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Old 11-29-2008, 07:05 PM   #113
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Hello Raul,

I think that your behaviour in this thread is not open to question. Given the sensitivities involved, the level of discourse in the thread has been exemplary.

As the elected head of a large international aikido organization, I am very interested in why organizatiions split into groups and, as I stated in an earlier post, the Philippines is no exception to a more general pattern. I suspect that the 'westernization' of aikido, especially since the war, has led to greater awareness of this phenomenon, which has been occurring in Japan for a much longer time, well before the creation of aikido.

I say 'westernization', because I am not aware of a corresponding 'asianization' of aikido. This a very interesting question, especially in view of O Sensei's belief in Omoto and his friendship with Okawa Shumei, who was a strong exponent of 'pan-asianism' as a counterbalance to the 'westernization' he saw taking place from the Meiji Restoration onwards.

Best wishes,

PAG

Quote:
Raul Rodrigo wrote: View Post
Dear Professor Goldsbury:

I agree that keeping quiet is probably not the optimal strategy for these situations. It allows old wounds to fester and tends to keep aikidoka in their own ghettoes. I have a feeling in fact, that some of the strong reactions directed at the affiliated aikidoka on this thread (Rommel Miel, Graeme, myself) have less to do with what we are actually saying, but from people reading into our statements some motivations and intentions that stem from incidents 20 or 30 years ago that we know nothing about and have nothing to do with. (Hence my question above, post 101, about the roots of the disharmony between PAPA and MAC.) There are apparently "old slights and insults" in the Philippine aikido world, as you say, that I am not aware of but which are still potent. But keeping quiet, as Ira suggests, will just maintain the mutual misunderstanding.

I am all for an atmosphere of mutual respect. I think I have tried to keep to a civil level of discourse in this thread. If I haven't achieved that, then my apologies to all concerned.

best,

R

P A Goldsbury
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Old 11-29-2008, 07:44 PM   #114
raul rodrigo
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Dear Prof. Goldsbury:

Thank you.

With regard to the phenomenon of budo organizations splitting up, let me offer the counter example of judo in the Philippines. There has been only one federation since the 1950s, the Philippine Amateur Judo Association (PAJA). I have been told by a yondan friend of mine from PAJA that they are as troubled by internal rivalries and animosities as Philippine aikido. But everyone stays inside the same "house" nonetheless. They do not break away and try to get a separate recognition from the International Judo Federation. I don't know the precise reasons why, but the odds are that the IJF would not grant a breakaway group their recognition anyway, and without that recognition, participation of Philippine judoka in international tournaments would be cut off. This provides, I think, a strong disincentive toward centrifugal forces/urges/impulses within Philippine judo.

In your opinion, does the Hombu policy of recognizing more than one federation per country provide a greater incentive toward centrifugal movements/breakaways? In our country, there are now four federations (up from only one in 1991) and a fifth group is currently organizing and hoping for Hombu recognition. What is the IAF's experience with sticking to recognizing only one per country? Does it ease tensions, increase tensions or both? Sometimes I feel that the aikido splits in our country were really unfortunate, and at others, I know that some of our older teachers have such strong personal animosities among themselves that it would have been a great strain to keep them all under the same roof.

Best,

RAUL

Last edited by raul rodrigo : 11-29-2008 at 07:54 PM.
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Old 11-29-2008, 09:02 PM   #115
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Hello Raul,

Here are some very brief responses to your observations and questions.

Quote:
Raul Rodrigo wrote: View Post
Dear Prof. Goldsbury:

Thank you.

With regard to the phenomenon of budo organizations splitting up, let me offer the counter example of judo in the Philippines. There has been only one federation since the 1950s, the Philippine Amateur Judo Association (PAJA). I have been told by a yondan friend of mine from PAJA that they are as troubled by internal rivalries and animosities as Philippine aikido. But everyone stays inside the same "house" nonetheless. They do not break away and try to get a separate recognition from the International Judo Federation. I don't know the precise reasons why, but the odds are that the IJF would not grant a breakaway group their recognition anyway, and without that recognition, participation of Philippine judoka in international tournaments would be cut off. This provides, I think, a strong disincentive toward centrifugal forces/urges/impulses within Philippine judo.
PAG. Personally, I suspect that the Aikikai sometimes have nightmares about aikido becoming like judo. Since O Sensei did not permit competition in aikido, it was never possible for winning and losing in aikido tournaments to become a mark of quality in aikido. In any case, Kano Jigoro was closely connected with the revival of the Olympic movement under Pierre de Coubertin, and I believe that the IOC recognizes only one international federation for each sport. The member federations of the IOC, in their turn, recognize only one national federation per country.

That the IAF also has this model is due, I think, to its origins in European judo. Aikido was originally practised in Europe by judoka who also wanted to practise aikido and one of the early Japanese shihans who went to Europe established his aikido organizations in each country under the general aegis of judo. This was very reasonable at the time, but was actually a certain recipe for problems, which did arise later on.

Quote:
Raul Rodrigo wrote: View Post
In your opinion, does the Hombu policy of recognizing more than one federation per country provide a greater incentive toward centrifugal movements/breakaways? In our country, there are now four federations (up from only one in 1991) and a fifth group is currently organizing and hoping for Hombu recognition. What is the IAF's experience with sticking to recognizing only one per country? Does it ease tensions, increase tensions or both? Sometimes I feel that the aikido splits in our country were really unfortunate, and at others, I know that some of our older teachers have such strong personal animosities among themselves that it would have been a great strain to keep them all under the same roof.

Best,

RAUL
PAG. The Aikikai were led to change their international regulations because of animosities among the Japanese shihans in Europe, but it was their students who brought these animosities into the open--at the 3rd IAF Congress held in Paris in 1980. The IAF, by the way, is very closely tied to international recognition and this is why it was created. I do not know about the Philippines, but many aikido organizations need recognition from a recognized international federation, in order to have access to public facilities for training and to receive government grants. Some countries do not exercise such control over the martial arts and the aikido organizations in these countries have no need of the IAF. However, many do--and the number is increasing.

I think it is very unlikely that the IAF will change its present policy of restricting membership to one organization per country. Some Japanese shihans would like the IAF to change, but the vast majority of delegates who attend the Congress are against such a change.

Best wishes,

PAG

P A Goldsbury
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Old 11-29-2008, 11:06 PM   #116
ken zen ichii
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Hello Rodrigo San,

Please call me by my first name, Ira and do not include san on it. Its been a long time since I visited the philippines and WOW it changed. Naliligaw ako and masyadong ma traffick.
Youre 42, Hindi tayo nagkakalayo ng edad.
I was born and raised in the Philippines of a Japanese Filipino Ancestry. I am a descendant of a Samurai Clan that were employed at the Osaka Castle during the early times of Japan but my ancestors finally settled in a place now called Kawagoe in Saitama.
Hoping to continue our conversations not only in this topic but on other subjects as well.
There will be a large Aiki Do Congress that will be held in the Nippon Budokan in Tokyo next year. Will you Guys be there.
Erwin Astorga, a former deshi of Rolando Delacruz will be with His Aiki Kai Sensei on that event (not yet confirmed though). Maybe We will have the chance to meet each other during that time.

Godspeed
Ira
Quote:
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Gomen nasai, Watanabe san. My mistake.

I am 43. I have been training for only 12 years.

best,

RAUL
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Old 11-30-2008, 06:09 AM   #117
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

If you mean the next All Nippon Aikido Embutaikai, then I definitely would like to be there. I have never been to one; all I've done is collect the All-Japan demo videos for several years. But I don't know this early what my schedule is going to be in May 2009 so it's hard to say. Certainly it would be good to meet up with you and any other Filipinos like Edwin A. who train in Tokyo. At the Embu, you might also run into Rene Vencer, who is training at the Hombu these days, I hear, or Romy Ballares and Francis Angeles, two Yoshinkan blackbelts who are friends of ours and very good aikidoka to boot. Kababayan are kababayan, after all.

best regards,

RAUL

Last edited by raul rodrigo : 11-30-2008 at 06:15 AM.
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Old 11-30-2008, 05:30 PM   #118
ken zen ichii
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Konichiwa,

About Aiki Do in the Philippines, How come that there are 4 groups that is affiliated with the Aiki Kai? 4 Groups with 4 leaders, Why not One Aiki Kai Philippines as Country chapter and under that Aiki Kai Philippines are branch chapter? Wouldn't that be more better? Just asking because I can't find a reason for this part.

渡辺 暖羅
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Old 12-01-2008, 12:11 AM   #119
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Yes, Ira, that would be the ideal situation. But we are not living in an ideal situation. Three of the current federations have their roots in the same federation, Aikido Philippines, born in 1992, split in 1997 and gave rise to FFA. A third federation was formed around 2005 by a senior teacher who was also formerly with Aikido Philippines. The seniors in control of the federations have a not too happy history with each other, which led to the splits. For these seniors, the level of personal animosity and the memory of past problems makes the prospect of reunification and/or close cooperation a very iffy proposition. We are a long way from what Prof Goldsbury called for in his earlier post: "mutual respect for a 'protocol of civilized conversation', which leads to mutual trust and a readiness to forget the old slights and insults."

best,

RAUL

Last edited by raul rodrigo : 12-01-2008 at 12:22 AM.
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Old 12-01-2008, 06:25 AM   #120
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Quote:
Raul Rodrigo wrote: View Post
Yes, Ira, that would be the ideal situation. But we are not living in an ideal situation. Three of the current federations have their roots in the same federation, Aikido Philippines, born in 1992, split in 1997 and gave rise to FFA. A third federation was formed around 2005 by a senior teacher who was also formerly with Aikido Philippines. The seniors in control of the federations have a not too happy history with each other, which led to the splits. For these seniors, the level of personal animosity and the memory of past problems makes the prospect of reunification and/or close cooperation a very iffy proposition. We are a long way from what Prof Goldsbury called for in his earlier post: "mutual respect for a 'protocol of civilized conversation', which leads to mutual trust and a readiness to forget the old slights and insults."

best,

RAUL
Hello,

Well in seems that fixing the problem will be close to impossible.
Maybe the junior members of all this groups should wait for their time to be the leaders of this groups and then if they wish they can, maybe, do something about this matter.
Master Otsuka, Founder of Wado Ryu Karate Do once said, the difference between possible and impossible is once will, so maybe when the time comes and their wounds from the not so happy past heals, maybe, just maybe, not only the Aiki Kai Philippines but all Aiki Do Ka's in the Philippines will unite.
If you dont mind me asking, When the Japanese Instructors from Aiki Kai goes to Philippines, usually how long do they stay to teach?
Training in the Hombu, actually it is not difficult, any body can go there, if you are a member just show your credentials and you can start, they have a daily basis rate on their training fee. For those not affiliated with the Aiki Kai all they have to do is sign up for Aiki Kai membership at the counter and they will be ready for training.
About the 2 filipinos in Yoshinkan, I think they entered the Uchi Deshi program, but for the filipinos in Aiki Kai hombu, I dont have a clue on which system they availed because if you have a tourist Visa here in Japan, which is for 3 months, you can already attend to their session which is not so expensive, siguro nga mas mahal pa sa Pilipinas, but for the Uchi Deshi system, you will need a long term Visa and a great deal of money because the Board and Lodging for the program is expensive. I think Ki Society Hombu, which is located about an hour from my house by car, is the most expensive, Not sure about the price, but Ive seen the place, Man, what a beautiful place. Complete facilities, Dormitories, Halls and Dojo's kanya nga lang nakakatakot ang presyo nila. How about you? Dont you have plans of joining the program?

OK got to go cause I will be on a 1,200 kilometer drive tomorrow for my project site in Shimane Prefecture, Got to drive the whole day tomorrow.

watanabe Ira
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Old 12-08-2008, 06:45 AM   #121
Drixster
Dojo: Phil. Aikikai (Phils)
Location: Colchester, Essex
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2
United Kingdom
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Hello to everyone..Im Eric Phil. Aikikai sensei during the 90's hope they still remember me. So whats the hot topic here? im not always online here but it seems previously there was a hot conversation regarding Omar Camar and legitimacy of the Phil Aikikai?
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Old 12-08-2008, 06:53 AM   #122
raul rodrigo
Location: Quezon City
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 777
Philippines
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Quote:
Eric Amada wrote: View Post
Hello to everyone..Im Eric Phil. Aikikai sensei during the 90's hope they still remember me. So whats the hot topic here? im not always online here but it seems previously there was a hot conversation regarding Omar Camar and legitimacy of the Phil Aikikai?
Please read the entire thread.

best,

R
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Old 12-09-2008, 04:31 AM   #123
reyne caritativo
Dojo: aikido philippines
Location: paranaque city
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 20
Philippines
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Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Hello there, I'm back. Sorry if it took me this llllonggg to reply to this thread. First of all, my apologies to Mr. William Hazen regarding Jun Batobalani Sensei's claim of being a direct student of the late Shoji Nishio Shihan. I'm not a member of his organization here in the Philippines and maybe I've made a mistake of saying that he is a direct student and I don't have the authority to say such things. I've only read it in a local newspaper some10 or more years ago about his plan of introducing Nishio-style aikido here in the Philippines, and I think it was mentioned that he is a direct student of Nishio Shihan. If it wasn't mentioned in this article( I was able to cut out the article, but i guess I lost it) about such claim, then I need to apologize also to Jun Batobalani Sensei. Anyways, I read the whole thread from the beginning to the last part and I think this is getting very interesting, in the historical point of view. I hope we could discuss more about Aikido's history in the Philippines which might have begun in the 50's, and hoping that some of our old-timers here in the Philippines can share their experiences in aikido. Anybody here knows something about the old Caltex Aikido Club in the 60's?
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Old 12-09-2008, 04:33 AM   #124
reyne caritativo
Dojo: aikido philippines
Location: paranaque city
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 20
Philippines
Offline
Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Hello there, I'm back. Sorry if it took me this llllonggg to reply to this thread. First of all, my apologies to Mr. William Hazen regarding Jun Batobalani Sensei's claim of being a direct student of the late Shoji Nishio Shihan. I'm not a member of his organization here in the Philippines and maybe I've made a mistake of sayi<textarea name="message" id="vB_Editor_001_textarea" rows="10" cols="60" style="width:410px; height:250px" tabindex="1" dir="ltr">Hello there, I'm back. Sorry if it took me this llllonggg to reply to this thread. First of all, my apologies to Mr. William Hazen regarding Jun Batobalani Sensei's claim of being a direct student of the late Shoji Nishio Shihan. I'm not a member of his organization here in the Philippines and maybe I've made a mistake of saying that he is a direct student and I don't have the authority to say such things. I've only read it in a local newspaper some10 or more years ago about his plan of introducing Nishio-style aikido here in the Philippines, and I think it was mentioned that he is a direct student of Nishio Shihan. If it wasn't mentioned in this article( I was able to cut out the article, but i guess I lost it) about such claim, then I need to apologize also to Jun Batobalani Sensei. Anyways, I read the whole thread from the beginning to the last part and I think this is getting very interesting, in the historical point of view. I hope we could discuss more about Aikido's history in the Philippines which might have begun in the 50's, and hoping that some of our old-timers here in the Philippines can share their experiences in aikido. Anybody here knows something about the old Caltex Aikido Club in the 60's?
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Old 12-10-2008, 02:03 AM   #125
Enrique Antonio Reyes
Dojo: Yuugou Aikido Kaisho
Location: Manila
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 132
Philippines
Offline
Re: Tracing my Philippine Aikikai Roots

Quote:
Eric Amada wrote: View Post
Hello to everyone..Im Eric Phil. Aikikai sensei during the 90's hope they still remember me. So whats the hot topic here? im not always online here but it seems previously there was a hot conversation regarding Omar Camar and legitimacy of the Phil Aikikai?
Welcome to the Forum!

I think it's mostly about the History of Aikido in the Philippines. Camar Sensei has in some ways became a sub-topic bringing out a lot of issues for clarification. A lot of the contributors have raised some good points on this matter so please review them and feel free to add any info that may enrich us " )

Have a good day!

One-Aiki,

Iking
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