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Old 10-11-2005, 08:25 PM   #1
FeW PseudoSKIV
Join Date: May 2005
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Te

I recently had the opportunity to watch a demonstration of Te...An ancient Okinawan art practiced by the Okinawan Royal Family with japanese influence that is the predecessor to Karate. Upon vewing the demonstration, I was taken back by how much of it was reminiscent of Aikido. The basic technique philosophy is to use your opponents momentum and thus manipulate him. (Said Seikichi Uehara, the recent headmaster) Does anyone know the history of this art? Or if it has any connections to Aikido?

-Thanks
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Old 10-11-2005, 11:26 PM   #2
CNYMike
Dojo: Finger Lakes Aikido
Location: Cortland, NY
Join Date: Jul 2004
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Re: Te

Quote:
Nicholas McDougall wrote:
I recently had the opportunity to watch a demonstration of Te...An ancient Okinawan art practiced by the Okinawan Royal Family with japanese influence that is the predecessor to Karate. Upon vewing the demonstration, I was taken back by how much of it was reminiscent of Aikido. The basic technique philosophy is to use your opponents momentum and thus manipulate him. (Said Seikichi Uehara, the recent headmaster) Does anyone know the history of this art? Or if it has any connections to Aikido?

-Thanks
What little I know of it is as you say, it's Okinawan; in all probablity, O Sensei would not have had exposure to it.

As for the same principles showing up, well, Aikido doesn't have sole title to the idea of redirecting and opponent's attack against him; some Chinese arts are like that, too. Joint locks look the same because there are only so many ways they can bend; to use up the range of motion, you have to do the same things regardless of whether the system is Chinese, Japanese, Okinawa, or Filipino.

I wouldn't lose sleep over it; if anything, I hope you enjoyed it!
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Old 10-12-2005, 04:28 AM   #3
ian
 
ian's Avatar
Dojo: University of Ulster, Coleriane
Location: Northern Ireland
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Re: Te

I think all martial arts are fluid and blending at a higher level (vis. advanced karateka and Kung Fu, even BJJ). I personally believe the reason for the loss of fluidity has something to do with the transference of the martial art; the teaching of large classes in a stocato method (walking up and down the hall), especially for children, and the excessive use of kata where the real meaning of the kata has been lost. For example, the 13 jo kata can be done both as a single person kata in its own right, or also with two attackers - however although the strikes are fundamentally the same the way it feels is entirely different because with people you have to constantly adjust yourself. I feel this understanding has been lost in the transference of many martial arts to the mass audience, although to some extent I see some karate teachers reintroducing it. Also, if you look at something like Kodokan Judo (the manual) you'll realise it contains many techniques (e.g. rokyo) which are not done in modern competitive aikido - in fact traditional judo aimed to take the best out of all the ju-jitsu schools available at the time. I don't know any martial arts master who is not fluid with their technique and utilises minimum energy.

For me I train in unarmed 'martial arts', but in my opinion aikido provides the best structure for learning it that is currently available to me.

---understanding aikido is understanding the training method---
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Old 10-12-2005, 11:28 AM   #4
tedehara
 
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Re: Te

"...In Yagyu Shinkage-ryu, we use Muto style which means fighting without a sword. Even though you opponent attacks with a sword, you fight back with bare hands and defeat him. That is what it is...

Today we can see that technique in Aikido and Karate. In novels, it is often called Shiken Shirahodori...you see scenes where a man takes an opponent's sword by his hands in the same pose as praying.

But in reality, as I said earlier like in Aikido and Karate, you get close to your opponent's body quickly and like Sekishusai Yagyu knocked Ieyasu over with his bare hands at a match, you get really close to your opponent and overthrow him."

Senior Instructor Yagyu Masakizaka Kenzen Dojo
from DVD Samurai Rebellion, Special Features

In Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere the authors list Morihei Uyeshiba as having studied fencing - Yagyu School, under Master Masakatsu Nakai (1903)

Today, people talk of weapons work and bare-handed techniques as if they were two separate things.

Last edited by tedehara : 10-12-2005 at 11:34 AM.

It is not practice that makes perfect, it is correct practice that makes perfect.
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Old 10-13-2005, 11:22 AM   #5
odudog
Dojo: Dale City Aikikai
Location: VA
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Re: Te

Quote:
Ted Ehara wrote:
"...Today, people talk of weapons work and bare-handed techniques as if they were two separate things.
I agree with this statement of yours Ted whole heartedly. I consciously keep the bokken in my Aikido. It's funny to see people stand and move one way with the bokken in their hand and then move entirely different as soon as the put the bokken down. I asked one guy in the dojo the other week, "what's wrong...your other is broken?" for he consistantly only used one arm.
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Old 10-14-2005, 05:47 AM   #6
Peter Seth
Dojo: Zanshin. Sunderland University
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Smile Re: Te

Hi All.
The art is 'Okinawan Te' (hand), the forerunner to kara 'te' - originally Naha 'Te' (a southern city in Okinawa) all derived from chinese arts. See: Martial Arts 'History and People'. sorry cant remember author/s or isbn - but book is about A4 about 25 - 30mm thick and blue in colour. well worth a read.
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