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Old 06-06-2005, 04:40 AM   #1
Fred26
Dojo: Budo Kai, Ki-Aikido
Location: Ístersund
Join Date: Jan 2005
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Taigi?

I just read an interesting post in the "General" section (along with several good clips) regarding something called Taigi.

In my local club we perform something that seems to be Taigi: namely two aikidoka performing a certain set of techniques under more or less formal circumstances (bowing in and out, every other aikidoka sitting still and observing)

But according to what I just read, Taigi is something that is specific to ki-aikido and not the other styles. Is this true? I mean the idea of two aikidoka performing a series of techniques under a certain degree of formality doesn't really spell out "ki-aikido" in my mind.

So whats the story? Is there an aikikai equivelant that doesn't focus as much on ki as in "original"-taigi or is there nothing of the sort at all in aikikai&other orgs?

Any info is apreciated.
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Old 06-06-2005, 05:29 AM   #2
PeterR
 
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Re: Taigi?

Sounds like Shodokan Enbu to me. Of course before Taigi the Ki-sters were decrying that with others of the Aikido world.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 06-07-2005, 04:05 AM   #3
Fred26
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Re: Taigi?

Quote:
Peter Rehse wrote:
Sounds like Shodokan Enbu to me. Of course before Taigi the Ki-sters were decrying that with others of the Aikido world.
Well ok, Shodokan has an equivelant. Thankies for the info.
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Old 06-07-2005, 08:51 AM   #4
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
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Re: Taigi?

Yoshinkan also has things like this...specific kata usually seen during embu of one form or the other. Kihon dosa to kanren waza is usually performed by the senshusei members at the yearly yoshinkan hombu embu. It consists of the basic movements and related technique done with a partner. The Doshinkan school I attend (IYAF) also uses the 10 basic pivots and related technique the same way.
Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
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"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 06-07-2005, 11:16 AM   #5
MaryKaye
Dojo: Seattle Ki Society
Location: Seattle
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Re: Taigi?

I'm sorry if what I said in the other thread was sloppy.

A lot of schools have various formal kata used for demonstration. I haven't heard this called "taigi" outside Ki Society but it certainly could be.

As far as I know (which isn't all that far) the thirty Ki Society formal taigi are unique to that school, except that the weapon ones are similar or identical to weapon kata done elsewhere. (I was startled to see the first jo taigi done in an independent school, but as a bo kata. If you are used to the jo rhythm it looks really odd with a bo.)

If my teachers call something "taigi" it implies that (a) it's one of the official thirty, not something else, and (2) it's going to be done as if for judged competition, even though we don't have those within the dojo. We do formal things in other contexts--testing is a series of prepared throws done in a specified order, often continuously--but there are particular teaching points for taigi that are handled differently than for regular techniques.

What I was mainly meaning to say in the other thread was, "If you are looking for these specific taigi done by a senior Aikikai person, I don't think you're likely to find that." Same as if you look for Stevens sensei's 75-count jo and bokken kata outside his tradition.

Mary Kaye
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Old 06-08-2005, 09:33 AM   #6
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
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Re: Taigi?

Oh, I get what you mean...I would not call the things I mentioned taigi. But the interesting comparison (some of which I just learned recently) is that

a) These are 'official' kata done across an entire organization of aikido schools

and

b) there is actually an embu in japan within the yoshinkan where these kata are done in a competitive sense and they are judged, and a 'winning' pair is selected.

As to the misogi no jo and misogi no ken kata, I know of one (at least marginally) yoshinkan school that does them, and I'm pretty sure that other students of Shirata Sensei teach similar variations as well, not just John Stevens.

And I'm wondering if Ki No Kenkyukai is part of the Aikikai...don't they still do something like taigi? Or at least similar buki waza as you'd find in the Ki Society? I know I've seen the buki waza and found it to look similar (not that I'm any expert in either system by any means).

Best,
Ron

Last edited by Ron Tisdale : 06-08-2005 at 09:35 AM.

Ron Tisdale
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"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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