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Old 06-01-2005, 09:20 AM   #1
daniel loughlin
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Question what do you think??

i have been training in aikido for many years now and will continue to do so.however i am thinking of taking up another art also either capoeira or wing chun.but i am not sure i should. also do you think my sensei would mind?? regards danny

Danny Loughlin
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Old 06-01-2005, 10:34 AM   #2
Stefan Stenudd
 
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Daniel Loughlin wrote:
also do you think my sensei would mind??
I think that you should start by discussing it with your sensei.
Since you have already done aikido for several years, I would think it's not a problem. For beginners, it can be confusing to start up with more than one MA at a time.

Stefan Stenudd
My aikido website: http://www.stenudd.com/aikido/
My YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Aikidostenudd
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Old 06-01-2005, 11:34 AM   #3
Paul Kerr
 
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Daniel Loughlin wrote:
i have been training in aikido for many years now and will continue to do so.however i am thinking of taking up another art also either capoeira or wing chun.but i am not sure i should. also do you think my sensei would mind?? regards danny
Cross training can have many benefits if you approach it correctly. In the time I have been practicing aikido I have actively cross-trained for periods in Hsing-Yi, TSKSR and Kendo. I enjoyed all of those experiences.

If you think it's an issue with your sensei, then speak to him. Most good teachers will not mind one bit and may even encourage you.
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Old 06-01-2005, 11:45 AM   #4
CNYMike
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Daniel Loughlin wrote:
i have been training in aikido for many years now and will continue to do so.however i am thinking of taking up another art also either capoeira or wing chun.but i am not sure i should ....
Go for it.

Quote:
also do you think my sensei would mind?? regards danny
Ask him.
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Old 06-09-2005, 10:30 AM   #5
beanchild
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Re: what do you think??

yeah definitely talk to your sensai about cross-training. mine is pretty cool about that, although he suggests that a student be advanced in our style before training elsewhere. i think it has to do with lessening confusion all around.
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Old 06-09-2005, 12:58 PM   #6
aikidoc
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Re: what do you think??

I would recommend dropping any comparison issues-don't try to insert you aikido in everything but learn what they have to show you and then do what you want with it after that.
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Old 06-09-2005, 09:23 PM   #7
CNYMike
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Maxine Henry wrote:
yeah definitely talk to your sensai about cross-training. mine is pretty cool about that, although he suggests that a student be advanced in our style before training elsewhere. i think it has to do with lessening confusion all around.
I've never gone along with this. I had my first exposure to Aikido when I'd been doing martial arts -- in this case, Shito-ryu karate-do -- for all of about a year and a half. No confusion at all. If you want to do something and your sensei isn't having a cow, go for it.
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Old 06-22-2005, 09:26 AM   #8
Mark Uttech
Dojo: Yoshin-ji Aikido of Marshall
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Re: what do you think??

Cross training is something that comes to us all, sooner or later. Generally it is much better to stick with one thing for ten years first. If, after ten years, you still want to cross train, you can either begin cross-training, or decide to train for another ten years first. In gassho.
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Old 06-22-2005, 10:43 AM   #9
aikigirl10
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Re: what do you think??

I'm sure your sensei wont mind, besides that , its your life , you can do what you want. And i strongly recommend wing chun. I take another type of kung fu (shaolin) , and i think its awesome. If wing chun is anything like shaolin , then you will absolutely love it. But dont forget Aikido!!!

-paige
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Old 06-27-2005, 11:56 AM   #10
daniel loughlin
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Re: what do you think??

thanks 2 everyone for your advise i can usually always get some good advise and different perspectives on subjects here thanks again danny

Danny Loughlin
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Old 06-27-2005, 09:43 PM   #11
CNYMike
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Re: what do you think??

You're welcome.
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Old 06-30-2005, 03:57 PM   #12
Adam Alexander
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Daniel Loughlin wrote:
i have been training in aikido for many years now and will continue to do so.however i am thinking of taking up another art also either capoeira or wing chun.but i am not sure i should. also do you think my sensei would mind?? regards danny
I say that you'll never catch on to Aikido if you're messing around with other arts...of what I've seen of other arts, you'll never catch on to them either while training Aikido.

Spend your time training in one...if you've got time to train in a second, you might as well just train in that because you're obviously not committed anyway.
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Old 06-30-2005, 07:25 PM   #13
Charles Hill
Dojo: Numazu Aikikai/Aikikai Honbu Dojo
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Re: what do you think??

Interestingly, Yamaoka Tesshu, the Meiji era swordsaint, forbid his beginning students from even watching other teachers for the first three years.

Charles
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Old 07-01-2005, 12:12 AM   #14
DustinAcuff
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Re: what do you think??

Here's my two cents.

My situation may or may not be applicable, you are welcome to decipher it however you wish.

When I started Aiki arts last Sept. I was training BJJ and Muai Thai in an MMA style format. I was proficient enough on the ground to deal with the majority of the population, and proficient enough with standup to hold my own against the average person. In neither art was I close to holding my own with the other people there, most of which were 5-15 years older than me and had been practicing for years in various MAs. Frankly, I was not that good at either one because I lack the mentality to hurt people in the name of training.

When I picked up the Aiki arts I had a number of ingrained problems like grabbing, moving, almost everything, and was progressing pretty slowly. I asked sensei about what was going on and he said that training in other arts, especially hard arts, can cause conflict when learning to be soft. I stopped doing BJJ and Muai Thai and improved rapidly.

I could have improved for any number of reasons, and my experience may not be applicable as a beginner for your situation. But I do agree with my sensei in that if you are training to be hard you will become hard. Half the Muai Thai (only practicing Muai Thai) have an insanely agressive slant to their personalities and scare me to death because they are so unbalanced. Before someone calls me on it, I am not saying all MT does this, just a number of the ones I have met.

I've looked into Wing Chun and Caporeia in the past and would still love to train both. I'd be worried that Wing Chun would develop some bad habbits in my Aiki but maybe not. Try it. Caporeia looks like alot of fun, great exercise, ukemi practice, extra footwork, and like an excellent idea for cross training. I'm going to look into it after I move and see if I cant find a Caporeia school after I move if I'm not too busy and not too broke. But I will say that I wish I had spent all my martial arts time so far in my life (8 years) under my current sensei in Daito instead of anything else.

Hope something there helps you with your decision. The worst thing that can happen is you discover an art that you don't like. Good luck.
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Old 07-01-2005, 05:18 AM   #15
Nick Simpson
Dojo: White Rose Aikido - Durham University
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Re: what do you think??

I often think about cross training and want to expand my knowledege and stuff like that. I like the idea of training in a very classical style of jujitsu or maybe daito ryu. But then I think that most of my spare time is taken up with aikido and I still have so much more not only to learn but to improve on, so Im going to keep at just aikido for quite a while. My friend is starting a judo class in september so i'll be going to that when i can. looking forward to it.

They're all screaming about the rock n roll, but I would say that it's getting old. - REFUSED.
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Old 07-01-2005, 11:26 AM   #16
CNYMike
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Jean de Rochefort wrote:
I say that you'll never catch on to Aikido if you're messing around with other arts...of what I've seen of other arts, you'll never catch on to them either while training Aikido.
I caught onto Kali pretty well to hear my instructor tell it while still doing karate, and never had trouble catching on to Tai Chi while doing karate and Kali.

In the year plus since I resumed Aikido, I've also been doing karate (with a college class, six months out of the year), Kali, Pentjak Silat Serak, and Aikido.

Quote:
Spend your time training in one...if you've got time to train in a second, you might as well just train in that because you're obviously not committed anyway.
Been going to Aikido once a week for more than a year and have no plans to stop going. You're right, I must not be committed.
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Old 07-01-2005, 11:39 AM   #17
CNYMike
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Dustin Acuff wrote:
Here's my two cents.

My situation may or may not be applicable, you are welcome to decipher it however you wish.

When I started Aiki arts last Sept. I was training BJJ and Muai Thai in an MMA style format ..... When I picked up the Aiki arts I had a number of ingrained problems like grabbing, moving, almost everything, and was progressing pretty slowly. I asked sensei about what was going on and he said that training in other arts, especially hard arts, can cause conflict when learning to be soft...
I heard just the opposite from my first Tai Chi teacher --- that doing Tai Chi ("being soft") helps your 'harder' stuff, mainly because the 'harder' arts use the same internal dynamics emphasized in the 'softer' ones.

Quote:
..... I stopped doing BJJ and Muai Thai and improved rapidly.
My take on it the problem wasn't the old habits -- you just had to learn the new ones. You have to learn to compartmentalize what you are doing -- keep MMA in MMA class and Aikido in Aikido class. And be patient. There are plenty of beginners in the dojo I go to and they have lots of problems; what are they in conflict with if they're not doing anything else?

Still, you made your decision already and it's moot. But FYI, you probably could have given that mix a few more months and seen where it went rather than just dropping stuff. JMHO.
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Old 07-01-2005, 01:16 PM   #18
Adam Alexander
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Michael Gallagher wrote:
Been going to Aikido once a week for more than a year and have no plans to stop going. You're right, I must not be committed.
LOL. Yeah, commited to walking up the path a foot, and then walking back down and over to walk up a different path a foot to walk back down that path to walk over to and up another path a foot to walk back down...LOL...to go back to the original path to go up a foot...to walk back down to the other path...LOL

You can't practice Aikido (and be remotely decent with it) without practicing a lot. If you spend one, two, three hours a week with it, maybe, someday, you'll be able to recognize a decent technique...Unfortunately, you'll be one of those guys/gals who thinks that what you know mentally will help you out of a physical situation that calls on no-thought response.

To the original poster, Aikido has every technique you need. If practiced and you're proficient, you'll never need anything else...but you can't get proficient if you're messing around with other arts.

Last edited by Adam Alexander : 07-01-2005 at 01:21 PM.
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Old 07-01-2005, 06:50 PM   #19
DustinAcuff
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Re: what do you think??

I agree with Jean about being better off on one hill.

Mike, I disagree about training MMAs helping out my aiki. It slowed me down pretty dramatically because I was reinforcing my bad habits more than I was trying to form new ones.. But I will admit that my aiki did improve my BJJ. But neither point is relavent to the origional poster.

Nick, check out Daito Ryu. If you like aikido and are wanting some crosstrainng I bet that Daito would be a good answer to you. Daito would probably expand your Aikido skills into diffrent areas and your Aikido would soften your Daito making you even more fluid. It would be alot like taking a more comprehensive version of aikido, depending on your instructors.
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Old 07-02-2005, 12:27 PM   #20
CNYMike
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Jean de Rochefort wrote:
LOL. Yeah, commited to walking up the path a foot, and then walking back down and over to walk up a different path a foot to walk back down that path to walk over to and up another path a foot to walk back down...LOL...to go back to the original path to go up a foot...to walk back down to the other path...LOL
Assuming the "paths" don't all cross each other as they go up the hill and it's easy to switch.

Quote:
You can't practice Aikido (and be remotely decent with it) without practicing a lot. If you spend one, two, three hours a week with it, maybe, someday, you'll be able to recognize a decent technique...Unfortunately, you'll be one of those guys/gals who thinks that what you know mentally will help you out of a physical situation that calls on no-thought response.
Well, that's it for me, then. I herby resign myself to doing lousy Aikido -- if any at all -- because I'm not doing any arts I want to quit (including Aikido). I announce forever that any and all board members can disregard anything I say on the subject because YOU have prdedicted my Aikido will always stink.

Thank you for clearing that up.

Oh, and if you'd like to e-mail my Aikido sensei and let him know he won't ever be good at Aikido because of doing things like kenjutusu, I'll give you his address in a PM; feel free.
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Old 07-02-2005, 12:28 PM   #21
CNYMike
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Dustin Acuff wrote:
I agree with Jean about being better off on one hill.
I am on one hill; I'm just zig-zagging up it.
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Old 07-02-2005, 02:00 PM   #22
Adam Alexander
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Re: what do you think??

Quote:
Michael Gallagher wrote:
I am on one hill; I'm just zig-zagging up it.
Nice responses.

I'd agree, there's occasions where the overlap is beneficial. However, the consequences are so severe, it's not worth it. Cross-training is detrimental to Aikido development.
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Old 07-02-2005, 02:20 PM   #23
Adam Huss
 
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Re: what do you think??

Where I come from there are many pepole that do multiple martial arts. We were talking about this and my teacher told me that your martial art should be like a tree. You first need to build/grow a solid base, then go and grow your branches. I'm sure he said it better than me, but the point is that there is a necesity to have a very strong base before you move into other things or is is very likely that you will get confused. Now it seems you've gotten some good experience in Aikido and want to move on. I've always like the close-in Chinese arts. They can flow into Aikido techniques pretty well. Everything I know about Caoperia I learned from videogames...so I know nothing about that. As for your teacher, I would just ask him, or ask a senior, wether or not your sensei will be offended. I love cross training though.
Good luck!
Osu!

Last edited by Adam Huss : 07-02-2005 at 02:24 PM.
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Old 07-02-2005, 02:37 PM   #24
Adam Alexander
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Re: what do you think??

Adam, what level should you reach before branching out?
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Old 07-03-2005, 11:54 AM   #25
Adam Huss
 
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Re: what do you think??

I don't know if there is a specific level or whatever. I think a lot of people say around the shodan level. I'd say it depends on the individual though. Shodan is really a begining rank anyways, just symbolizing the fact that you do have a good solid fundamental base and are now ready to become a "serious" student. I had done GoJu Ryu Karate from the age of 9 till about 8th grade. Quite due to sports, got back in my senior year of highschool and the dojo I returned to started doing Aikido, so I started doing that. From there I got into Iaido a bit (but I've never tested in it). I've also done a bit of Uechi Ryu from time to time. Coincidentally all the martial arts I've studied are Japanese. I never actually realized this until a year or two ago. So its nice that they all fit in together in that way. But I've done some Chinese and Indonesian martial arts at seminars and I enjoy those alot as well.
When it comes down to it, I guess, you can never have enough experience..even if its a bad experience, you can still learn something from it. Its just important that, when cross training, you don't get things mixed up and get overwhelmed by trying to learn too many things that you are completley foreign to at the same time. And try not to be one of those "I have a shodan in 6 different martial arts" people. Not that that is wrong or anything, but don't let a 1st deg. black belt stop your training. I find that its better to have one or two martial arts that are your base and build those up for years and years. I would rather have a yondan in Aikido and, say, a nidan in karate, etc. than have a shodan in aikido, karate, jujitsu, pentjak silat, etc etc. I would recomend not to platuea your martial arts training, but at least pick one that you will stick with and continue to grow and get a no bullcrap deep understanding of one style.
Anyways, good luck with everything! Sounds like your on the right track. And let us know how everything works out.
Osu!

~Adam

P.S. Where do you train at in Detriot? Who do you train with? I am up there all the time (Mt. Clemens) and I love visiting as many different aikido dojo's as I can.

Ichi Go, Ichi Ei!
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