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Old 07-06-2004, 06:23 AM   #1
ian
 
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Dojo: University of Ulster, Coleriane
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commitment vs responsiveness

How do you balance commitment in a technique with repsonsiveness? Which is most important in practical situations? i.e. having an idea of a technique before the attack, and following through with this technique can be very effective. However if the technique is not appropriate it can fail. Alternatively you can blend with the attacker, but the commitment to a single technique can be poor.

Though I tend to favour the blending concept, when I see Ueshiba on video (esp. later) he seems to do irimi-nage or ikkyo almost all the time, and only change when he feels resistance.

Any thoughts?

Ian
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Old 07-06-2004, 06:35 AM   #2
Yann Golanski
 
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Dojo: York Shodokan Aikido
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Re: commitment vs responsiveness

This is exactly why we train in kuzushi -- balance breaking -- all the time. It's essential to be able to take uke's balance before you can apply a technique. Then whatever technique will come naturally. It's the corner stone of randori.

One of the things I found doing randori is the more uke resists by being responsive to my kuzushi, the harder it is for me to thrown him -- shocker!!! Whatever the attack, I try to avoid and if that works then apply any kuzushi that I know. If that works, the technique is generally easy to follow.

As for Ueshiba, irimi nage and ikkyo are the basic technique one learns on the first night of doing Aikido... hence they are the ones that are practiced the longest. Thus it's probably the ones you are the best with. *shrugs* I guess...

The people who understand, understand prefectly.
yann@york-aikido.org York Shodokan Aikido
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Old 07-06-2004, 10:28 AM   #3
akiy
 
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Re: commitment vs responsiveness

Hi Ian,

Good question!

In everyday practice, I think this depends on the context of what is being practiced at the particular time.

For example, if we're practicing kihonwaza in a set, "kata" fashion, then both nage and uke should be providing proper intent and movement so that both parties can succeed in delving into the form. If we're practicing jiyuwaza/randori, then it's important to hone one's abilities to perceive the most proper response to what's going on and work fluidly and resiliently.

Personally, I think that this ability to perceive and respond appropriately is crucially important in one's development in aikido. However, from what I've felt from high level people is that this ability, in turn, affects one's kihonwaza in such a way that even in a "set" form such as, say, shomenuchi iriminage, there are miniscule adjustments going on all throughout so that the form of the technique is still the same as the basic kihonwaza kata but its content is different than, say, one you might feel from a shodan. In other words, I believe the ability to be able to do a certain technique is very important as well.

To expand the question a bit...

How do you balance commitment in a technique with repsonsiveness as uke?

-- Jun

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