Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-25-2001, 03:53 PM   #1
Erik
Location: Bay Area
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 1,200
Offline
I recently purchased a digital camera with which I've been able to take some fairly decent pictures, particularly outdoors, with one exception. Either Aikidoist's are just too ugly for my camera and it rejects us or I'm doing something wrong. Since we all know how extraordinarily good looking we all are, it must be my camera skill that lacks.

So, how do you all get decent pictures in the poor light and fast motion that is Aikido? Feel free to talk techie as I can mostly relate to the terminology and my camera does think in terms of shutter speed, f-stops and the like.

All advice and suggestions welcome.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2001, 04:05 PM   #2
Jim23
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 482
Offline
Quote:
Erik wrote:

So, how do you all get decent pictures in the poor light and fast motion that is Aikido?
Erik,

What speed film are you using?

Jim23

Remember, all generalizations are false
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2001, 04:11 PM   #3
Jim23
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 482
Offline
That was a stupid post, you're not using film!!

Jim23

Remember, all generalizations are false
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2001, 04:51 PM   #4
Erik
Location: Bay Area
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 1,200
Offline
Quote:
Jim23 wrote:
That was a stupid post, you're not using film!!

Jim23
Actually, not that dumb. The camera has an ISO setting up to 400, which is where I'm attempting to work at. Maybe I need something even faster?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2001, 06:05 PM   #5
Jim23
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 482
Offline
I was going to say try ISO 400 film.

I'm no expert with digital cameras. Have you tried shooting with better lighting? If an ISO 400 setting and good lighting don't work, it could just be the nature of "consumer" digital cameras.

Jim23

Remember, all generalizations are false
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2001, 11:38 PM   #6
AikiBiker
Dojo: Aiki O'Kami Society
Location: Daytona Bch, Fl
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 19
Offline
I don't know all that much about cameras in general but I have taken a few photos in the dojo while recovering from an injury.

My advice is to be familiar with the technique you are shooting and pick ahead of time what part you want to catch on film. You should also be familier with any delay between pushing the button and the picture actually being taken. (Timing is very important. ^_^)

For some good incite into consumer digital cameras and Japan in general I would suggest you visit the "Jani in Japan" website.

http://www.hut.fi/~jpatokal/travel/j2j.html

I beleave he starts talking about cameras in week 16.

Hope this helps in some way.

Later
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2001, 04:01 AM   #7
aarjan
Dojo: Aikidostichting "Musubi" De Bollenstreek
Location: Sassenheim, The Netherlands
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 25
Netherlands
Offline
I have a digital camcorder with the ability to use the shutter while filming (I think about 6 pics per second). This results in very good stills when the lighting is good.

Aarjan
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2001, 10:27 AM   #8
lt-rentaroo
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 237
Offline
Erik,

Your digital camera must be more advanced than mine, because mine does not have any ISO settings. ISO settings were developed for film cameras, it has to do with the film's chemistry. My camera also does not have the shutter speed settings that most film cameras have. If your camera has shutter speed settings, perhaps selecting a faster one will help with the pictures (at least action pictures). Shutter speed controls how long the film or digital sensor is exposed to light. If your shutter speed is too slow it will result in a blurry action picture even if your film is rated ISO 1000.

I use a Fuji MX-1200 digital camera (not considered to be advanced by today's standards) and have had great success with it. As you mentioned, lighting is very important with a digital camera. If you have too much light, the picture will appear faint; not enough and the picture turns out dark. Oh, and flourescent lighting is awful with digital cameras; it has something to do with the "flickering" that many flourescent lights are notorious for.

F-stops determine the aperture of the camera's lens. Aperture refers to the size of the opening that allows light to enter through the cameras shutter. Since digital cameras don't have a "shutter" in the traditional sense (most have either a CCD sensor or a CMOS sensor) the aperture setting is probably adjusted electronically. If you set a small aperture (large f-stop number) on your camera, you will let less light in through the lens to reach the sensor. The exact opposite is true; if you select a large aperture (small f-stop number) on your camera, you will let more light through the lens to reach the sensor. Action pictures work best in good lighting conditions, so a larger aperture would allow more light to reach the sensor.

Personally, I use the automatic settings and let the camera decide what is best. Have a good day!

LOUIS A. SHARPE, JR.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Aikido of Northern VA Seminars - Doran-sensei in Northern Virginia, March 2015



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aikido in Amsterdam, Terry Lax style... tiyler_durden General 11 11-03-2008 09:31 AM
Women and Everybody Else in Aikido George S. Ledyard Teaching 113 03-16-2008 08:27 PM
?? Exaggeration in Aikido ?? Roy General 305 03-30-2006 01:34 PM
Dilution of aikido eugene_lo General 40 02-07-2006 12:22 PM
Omoto-kyo Theology senshincenter Spiritual 77 12-04-2005 10:50 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:15 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate