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Old 04-03-2004, 08:00 AM   #1
James Whatling
Dojo: Stockton, UK
Location: Middlesbrough, UK
Join Date: Apr 2004
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Unhappy How to remember?

With my grading from 7th to 6th Kyu coming at the end of the month, I'd really like to hear people views on the best way in which to remember the names of the techniques. Thanks
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Old 04-03-2004, 09:16 AM   #2
bob_stra
Location: Australia
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Re: How to remember?

Quote:
James Whatling wrote:
With my grading from 7th to 6th Kyu coming at the end of the month, I'd really like to hear people views on the best way in which to remember the names of the techniques. Thanks
Mnemonics

http://www.mindtools.com/memory.html

http://members.aol.com/beagenius/membasics.html

http://www.thememorypage.net/

Use the same tech recommended to remember people's names. Ie: Sankyo becomes a fat, dwarf like Elvis Presley in a rhinestone Gi shaking your hand and tweaking it ("sank you, sankyou very much. Elvis has left the building").

Tip: Try to make is as insane as possible and be sure to use at least 3 out of 6 senses in your little story (ie: in the above colour, movement, sound and texture are prominant. Thus, touch, sight and hearing)
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Old 04-03-2004, 10:19 AM   #3
John Boswell
 
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Dojo: Aikido of Midland
Location: Midland, Texas
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My recommendations:

1) Learn to count in Japanese. Ichi, Ni, San, etc.... Ikkyo, Nikyo, Sankyo, makes those techniques easy to remember.

2) Write out the names and definitions on seperate peice of paper or make flash cards. It helps to relate it all in your mind when you actually write it all out and define it. Forces you to think about it, say it, read and write it. It helps.

3) Get "Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere" book. Some don't like it, but I do and there is a ton of information and good diagrams in there.

Good luck! Give it time but don't get frustrated... it'll come eventually!

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Old 04-03-2004, 10:30 AM   #4
thatoldfool
 
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Dojo: Aikido de la Montagne
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In Aikikai, we start at 5th kyu, and I know I worried like never before for my test, loooong ago

However, what helped me was finding out what the parts of the words ment. Maybe it'll be a bit tricky for your first test, or maybe even second, if they're in close proximity...however, once you learn the parts, then you'll be set for the next test.

Mr. Boswell's recommendation to learn how to count in Japanese is a good one - learning that basically takes care of all the grips.

Lastly - get the list out, and visualize you move as you read the name. Repeat until the names are memorized.

Good luck! Ki be with you

"Best to be like water,
Which benefits the ten thousand things
And does not contend."
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Old 04-03-2004, 11:48 AM   #5
Robert Jackson
Dojo: seishinkan
Location: Texas City.
Join Date: Nov 2003
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The best advice I have is pratice. Everytime you or your sensie does a techqiue repeat the name making note of how the attack in taken. For instance Katatetori, wrist grab... everytime you see it say to yourself katatetori. When you do a move call it out to yourself "Katatetori Nikkio" do the techinque then call it out to yourself again... much like a spelling bee. That's how I'm able to remember what they are.

Soon You'll be able to associate the techquies and attacks with the name and you really will not be in much trouble you get to that point.

I put my right foot in, I put my left foot out, I do the Aikipokey and throw you all about
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Old 04-03-2004, 04:56 PM   #6
MaryKaye
Dojo: Seattle Ki Society
Location: Seattle
Join Date: Dec 2003
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I nearly blew my fifth kyu tests due to the language issue (one of my teachers surreptitiously juggled my name down to the bottom of the list, and then I just tried to remember what everyone else had done). After that I started keeping a notebook and writing down every throw I could remember after each class, along with a description.

The first few months of descriptions are really crummy--I didn't have the understanding or the vocabulary--but trying to do it made me learn names a lot faster. And eventually I started to see patterns, which helps even more.

Any time you see a throw try to guess its name, and if possible check your guess. "That's kaitenage, right?" takes only a few seconds and unless you have very strict no-talking rules shouldn't annoy your partner too much.

A word of caution: different traditions use different names, so looking things up on the Web, while it's sometimes useful, can also add to your confusion. A lot of things that my school calls 'kokyunage', others call 'iriminage'--that sort of thing. The best bet on the Web is dojo of your specific tradition.

Mary Kaye
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Old 04-03-2004, 08:54 PM   #7
Noel
Location: Rochester, NY
Join Date: Nov 2003
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As mentioned above, repeating the technique names as, or before, you do them worked for me. Also the "learn what key words mean" thing can be helpful, assuming you are calm enough to noodle out what technique was just called (I'm usually not).

Final option, do the first thing that comes, your body really does remember more than you think. Worst case, doing the wrong technique with conviction gets more credit than letting yourself get hit with uke's strike.

My cent-and-a-half,

-Noel
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Old 04-04-2004, 01:16 AM   #8
p00kiethebear
 
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I know it's probably harder for some people. I had 8 months of practice (and well over the ammount of required time) before our dojo got around to gokyu testing.

I found that just after time you begin to pick everything up. I also find that whenever sensei is showing technique I look for three things.. The hanmei, the attack, and the technique. For gokyu testing, if you can remember just the attack and the hanmei, you can probably do all the testing techniques, because for gokyu all the attacks are different for each requirement (assuming you're testing under the USAF)

I doesn't sound like you have the luxury of waiting for time to take it's course right now. So what i would do, is talk to sensei, and an experienced person who is gokyu or above to work with you privately (my sensei is pretty leanient about letting us use the dojo if there are no other classes going on) and just have him work with you on JUST the requirements. Have him say it before the technique is executed, and then you say it, after the technique is over.

Good luck. hope this is helpfull

"Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity"
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Old 04-04-2004, 10:50 AM   #9
SeiserL
 
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Dojo: Roswell Budokan, Kyushinkan Dojo, Aikido World Alliance
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Mentally rehearse (visualize) the technique, see the name accross your mind, and hear it.

As you do the technique, subvocalize the approach, the technique, and the direction.

Like Aikido, it just takes practice, no secrets.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 04-25-2004, 04:25 AM   #10
James Whatling
Dojo: Stockton, UK
Location: Middlesbrough, UK
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Re: How to remember?

Thanks to all, i'm doing the test in two weeks and have started doing extra with my uke, on just what is needed. He is 2nd Kyu and is a great help.

Thanks again for your advice it's been very helpful,
Will let you all know how i did.

James
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