Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-07-2004, 06:15 PM   #1
seneka
Location: Boston
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 2
Offline
practicing aikido on business trips

I just recently started practicing aikido and I love it a lot! Now my job requires some traveling 3-4 times a year for 2-4 weeks. I don't want (in fact can't ) to waste that time. I see at least two ways to deal with it: find some local dojo where I am going and/or practice alone although I am not sure that it works this way in aikido.
What do you guys do in this situation?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2004, 09:26 PM   #2
PeterR
 
PeterR's Avatar
Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 3,020
Japan
Online
I always visit local dojos - any style, any level. Beats sitting in the bar or watching chat shows on the TV.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 05:08 AM   #3
batemanb
 
batemanb's Avatar
Dojo: Seibukan Aikido UK
Location: body in UK, heart still in Japan
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,029
Offline
I always visit a local dojo if at all possible (may be worth contacting in advance if you don't know them).

The other week we had a gentleman turn up from Germany who was over on business and found us on the web. We are more than happy for people in the area to turn up and train.

rgds

Bryan

Last edited by batemanb : 03-08-2004 at 05:11 AM.

A difficult problem is easily solved by asking yourself the question, "Just how would the Lone Ranger handle this?"
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 07:47 AM   #4
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
I had a really good experience at Aikido Centers of New Jersey on a business trip. They welcomed me to training, had a shodan stick with me the first night to clue me in on how they do things, and really made me feel at home. I trained there two nights, and would have done more except for the fact that I had work stuff I couldn't skip (yeah, even at night).

I highly recommend contacting any prospective dojo ahead of your trip if possible...makes it more compfortable for everyone, in my opinion. Vacations are also sometimes good for this kind of thing...Jun made me feel right at home in Boulder when I was there this past christmas.

Good Luck,

Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 08:08 AM   #5
MikeE
 
MikeE's Avatar
Dojo: Midwest Center For Movement & Aikido Bukou Dojos
Location: Hudson, WI
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 407
Offline
Whenever, where ever, I travel, I have a space in my suitcase for my gi, hakama, and obi.

In 15 years I was refused training at one dojo. Not bad odds.

Mike Ellefson
Midwest Center
For Movement &
Aikido Bukou
Dojos
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 08:25 AM   #6
BC
Location: Chicago, IL
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 432
Offline
I travel for work at least a dozen times a year, and will almost always pack my keikogi and obi. I have always been welcomed, and each practice has been a rewarding experience. In fact, nowadays if I can't find a dojo to visit on buisiness trips, I am dissapointed.

Hey Ron, I too had a wonderful visit at ACONJ in Elizabeth, and even bought one of their cool t-shirts while I was there! Wonderful folks with good strong aikido.

Robert Cronin
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 08:27 AM   #7
jon_jankus
Dojo: aikido of westchester
Location: new york
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 10
Offline
Mike E.-

I'm surprised that you were turned away even once. Was there a reason?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 10:02 AM   #8
gamma80
Dojo: Avon Kempo & Aikido Academy
Location: Avon, CT
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 32
Offline
Aside from the obvious benefit of not missing your regular training at home, training at other dojos while on the road gives you the opportunity to see how other schools interpret techniques, even standard stuff like Ikyo and Shihonage. These differences are sometimes subtle nuances and sometimes radically different approaches. Either way the exposure can't help but improve your Aikido (and appreciation for other schools).

During my last visit to a dojo in Pennsylvania I learned some new approaches to Shomenuchi and shared some variations on leading techniques. Mutually beneficial night for all (mostly me, having been spared yet another evening in the hotel).

Chris
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 11:01 AM   #9
seneka
Location: Boston
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 2
Offline
Thanks to everybody answering my question! I was under impression that it's not that easy to "enroll" into local dojo just for a couple of days or so. I am glad I was wrong

But what do you do if you go to some place without dojo? Suppose you plan to spend your next vacation hiking in some remote area. There are no dojos and you still have the energy and willingness to do some aikido in the evenings. What poor aikidoka would in this case? Any thoughts?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 11:14 AM   #10
fullerfury
Dojo: Aikido Suimei
Location: Phoenixville, Pennsylvania
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 72
United_States
Offline
Quote:
Chris Jordan (gamma80) wrote:
Aside from the obvious benefit of not missing your regular training at home, training at other dojos while on the road gives you the opportunity to see how other schools interpret techniques, even standard stuff like Ikyo and Shihonage. These differences are sometimes subtle nuances and sometimes radically different approaches. Either way the exposure can't help but improve your Aikido (and appreciation for other schools).

During my last visit to a dojo in Pennsylvania I learned some new approaches to Shomenuchi and shared some variations on leading techniques. Mutually beneficial night for all (mostly me, having been spared yet another evening in the hotel).

Chris
Hi Chris. I am sorry I missed you during your visit. Everyone at class enjoyed your presence on the mat. Perhaps you will come back to the area on business again and we will get a chance to train together.

Garrett
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 11:20 AM   #11
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Since I'm in the yoshinkan, I practice basic movements, 180 degree pivot, cross-step in body change, elbow power 1,2, afterclass exercise 1,2, etc. If hiking I carry a walking stick, and practice jo kata 1, do suburi, happo giri, hashu giri, stuff like that.

Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 11:31 AM   #12
gamma80
Dojo: Avon Kempo & Aikido Academy
Location: Avon, CT
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 32
Offline
Sensei Fuller, I too am sorry to have missed you during my visit, a perfect example for Dmitry's post. By the time I left class I felt like I had met a new set of friends. A credit to you indeed! Will definitely call ahead next time I'm in town!

Dmitry, as for training when no dojo is to be found Ron hit it right on the head. Kihon. Practice your basics - All the stuff you would (should) normally be doing on days you aren't on the mat.

Chris
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 11:44 AM   #13
akiy
 
akiy's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 5,835
Offline
Quote:
dmitry skavish (seneka) wrote:
Thanks to everybody answering my question! I was under impression that it's not that easy to "enroll" into local dojo just for a couple of days or so.
Pretty much all dojo that I've visited has a "mat fee" that allows visitors to train for a class or for an entire day. I've seen this range from free to US$20.

-- Jun

Please help support AikiWeb -- become an AikiWeb Contributing Member!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 12:07 PM   #14
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,916
Offline
Quote:
dmitry skavish (seneka) wrote:
But what do you do if you go to some place without dojo?
well, heck, Dmitry, why'd you want to do THAT?! (smile)

If I were in that unfortunate a situation, and it were out in the country, I'd use my walking stick for weapons work and practice footwork and rolls. In the city, I'd just use my hotel exercise room to keep fit until I got back to real civilization.

Just want to add, that not only is it fun to visit other dojo when travelling, if you are regularly in another place, even once a year, you can start building some nice friendships. One of my favorite training/dinner partners lives 3000 miles away but is here on business a couple of times most years.

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 01:19 PM   #15
rachmass
Dojo: Aikido of Cincinnati/Huron Valley Aikikai
Location: Somerset Michigan
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 794
Offline
I love it when I get visitors at my dojo. if they come with a good attitude, they are always welcome! It's lots of fun to have a visitor.

Pretty much the only time I travel, it is for aikido. Sometimes I have to go to Chicago, but then Robert Cronin's dojo is a great place to visit. I did meet a really nice man from Chicagoland who has a dojo out that way too, and next time I'm there, I'm going to stop in to practice at his dojo.

Getting out and meeting new people at different dojos is great fun. I've never met a bad apple in the bunch (and trust I never will).

best wishes for your travels!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2004, 02:38 PM   #16
Jack Simpson
Dojo: Western Maryland Aikikai - Frederick, Maryland
Location: hangin' with the tengu in the "mountains" of Maryland
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 91
Offline
Dmitry,

Traveling and training at new dojos is one of the great joys of aikido, in my opinion. I have just returned from a business trip to Portland, Oregon and had a great time training there. As others have mentioned, most dojos will welcome you with open arms, but there are a few things to keep in mind.

1) always call or email ahead if possible

2) arrive early and make sure to introduce yourself to the sensei.

3) ask if there is a mat fee or if you can make a small donation to the dojo.

2) I always take along a white belt, in case there is a question of rank.

3) I always sit at the "low end" of the mat when bowing in and out.

4) I try to follow exactly what the instructor is doing, and stick with that when training with others. Remember, you're there to try to learn "their" aikido.

5) Be on your best behavior. Especially with regards to etiquette. You're representing not only yourself, but also your school and sensei.

6) Take along a flyer or business card from your home dojo to leave and be sure to invite people to train at your dojo should they be in the area.

7) Have fun !

That being said, I've only run into two times when things were somewhat "strained". At one dojo I was asked to present my USAF card. Luckily I had it, and I don't even think they're used anymore. The second instance, I invited a colleague who was curious to come watch a class at a local dojo. Unfortunately, he wasn't allowed to watch by the instructor. This is very unusual. These types of things can be cleared up with an advance phone call.

I think it is one of the great things about aikido that there is such openness to others when visiting. Take advantage of it and have fun!

Jack
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2004, 11:47 AM   #17
Kieun
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 24
Offline
Is visiting dojos like this OK if I am unranked? I've been doing aikido for about 6 months now and have not been tested yet becasue our chief instructors been away for a while (my main training has been with the senir sempai there in teh meanwhile). I am planning (well, at least would like to plan) on going back home to NYC for a couple of weeks in the summer and while there thought about training at the NY Aikikai. But since I don't even have a kyu grade yet, is this still acceptable? Thanks.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2004, 01:01 PM   #18
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
I should think it would be quite acceptable. The only issues I've heard of are if you are ranked, and wanted to wear that rank, and it was unverifiable. Ususally if its just for one or two sessions, people really don't care that much.

Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2004, 08:13 PM   #19
Ian Williams
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 136
Offline
Isn't there a question of public liability insurance if you're visiting a dojo? This seems to be an issue in Australia at the moment.

Tsutsumi Ryu Jujitsu
Adelaide, South Australia

Te audire no possum. Musa sapientum fixa est in aure
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2004, 01:29 AM   #20
batemanb
 
batemanb's Avatar
Dojo: Seibukan Aikido UK
Location: body in UK, heart still in Japan
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,029
Offline
Quote:
Jun Akiyama (akiy) wrote:
Pretty much all dojo that I've visited has a "mat fee" that allows visitors to train for a class or for an entire day. I've seen this range from free to US$20.

-- Jun
First timers at our dojo don't pay, whether they've trained before or not. On subsequent visits, as long as they have personal indemnity insurance (such as that provided by the British Aikido Board), they can train for the normal class fee of a whopping 4.

Regards

Bryan

A difficult problem is easily solved by asking yourself the question, "Just how would the Lone Ranger handle this?"
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2004, 01:31 AM   #21
batemanb
 
batemanb's Avatar
Dojo: Seibukan Aikido UK
Location: body in UK, heart still in Japan
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,029
Offline
Quote:
Kieun Kim (Kieun) wrote:
Is visiting dojos like this OK if I am unranked? I've been doing aikido for about 6 months now and have not been tested yet becasue our chief instructors been away for a while (my main training has been with the senir sempai there in teh meanwhile). I am planning (well, at least would like to plan) on going back home to NYC for a couple of weeks in the summer and while there thought about training at the NY Aikikai. But since I don't even have a kyu grade yet, is this still acceptable? Thanks.
Stick your head around the door whenever you are in our area

Regards

Bryan

A difficult problem is easily solved by asking yourself the question, "Just how would the Lone Ranger handle this?"
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2004, 01:37 AM   #22
batemanb
 
batemanb's Avatar
Dojo: Seibukan Aikido UK
Location: body in UK, heart still in Japan
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,029
Offline
Quote:
Ian Williams wrote:
Isn't there a question of public liability insurance if you're visiting a dojo? This seems to be an issue in Australia at the moment.
It's expected in the UK too. Most clubs and associations (not all) belong to the British Aikido Board. The BAB issues all members a PI slip annually, this covers you in the UK and Europe. If you go wider abroad, you need to arrange your own cover, I recomend you do this for your own safety and peace of mind. In the UK, the standard travel policy from Columbus Direct covers most sports which includes Martial Arts.

If you don't have cover, and the dojo you are visiting demands it, you can't expect to train. Due diligence works both ways.

Regards

Bryan

A difficult problem is easily solved by asking yourself the question, "Just how would the Lone Ranger handle this?"
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2004, 08:29 AM   #23
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
In my experience in the states, you sign a waver. Visitors are covered under our policy as long as they sign (in other words, any suit would not come out of our pockets). I signed such a waver both in Colorado and in New Jersey, and I believe a couple of times here in PA. I've been told that the waivers aren't worth much, but at least they are something.

Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2004, 08:53 AM   #24
Josh Bisker
Dojo: Oberlin Aikikai, and Renshinkan London
Location: Oberlin, OH
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 74
United_States
Offline
Right now I'm studying in England and planning on traveling around the UK and Europe in the late spring/summer. I have certain places I'm planning on going to and my idea is to get in touch with a dojo in each area I go to, make friends and train that way. Will I have a problem being low-ranked? Obviously different schools will have different expectations for hakama, that's expected, but will I be as welcome as a journeying whitebelt as I would be as a traveling blackbelt? Also, will i run into insurance problems, etc?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2004, 09:33 AM   #25
MaryKaye
Dojo: Seattle Ki Society
Location: Seattle
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 522
Offline
When I have done this (in the US) as a fifth kyu everyone has made me very welcome. You'll want to exercise your own judgement in what moves you attempt, though, as some teachers are more ... optimistic than others.

In some ways I think it's actually easier to be a guest as a low-ranked student than a high-ranked student. When I was in Maui there was also a shodan-ranked visitor from a quite different tradition. He was gloriously competent with everything the schools had in common, but clearly just as puzzled by the ki tests as us novices, and also by the differences in sword technique. I thought he handled this with grace, but it seemed as though it could be somewhat trying. Novices are *used* to feeling as if they don't know what's going on.

Especially if you train outside your tradition, be prepared for a certain amount of "everything you know is wrong." Etiquette is to bite your tongue and do it the way they do, as much as you possibly can. (Also be prepared, when you get home, for your teachers to have the same reaction.)

Mary Kaye
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Seminar with Frank Doran, Shihan - Aug. 8-10, 2014 at Sunset Cliff's Aikido, near San Diego's finest beaches



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aikido in Amsterdam, Terry Lax style... tiyler_durden General 11 11-03-2008 08:31 AM
Omoto-kyo Theology senshincenter Spiritual 77 12-04-2005 09:50 PM
Practicing Jodo alongside Aikido? Fred26 General 22 04-06-2005 01:13 AM
Two things. Veers General 8 04-04-2003 01:54 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:47 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate