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Old 01-16-2004, 02:52 AM   #26
philipsmith
Dojo: Ren Shin Kan
Location: Birmingham
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The Aikikai Hombu regulations are reasonably strict as regards eligibility for Fukushidoin and Shidoin but leaves the actual appointment process to individual organisations.

I was appointed Fukushidoin & Shidoin by Chiba Sensei during his time in the UK without any examination, but he now has a strict examination procedure.

We also have a fairly strict procedure but based on continual assessment over two or three years with special training sessions etc.

As for someone starting Aikido with the ambition of being a teacher; why not? Providing they are prepared to work at it over a long period they should acheive their goal.
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Old 01-16-2004, 03:06 AM   #27
kironin
 
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Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote:
I think only the lack of a place where I could train happily would influence me to open a dojo now...

Ron
which is how I ended up running a dojo.

didn't plan on it. Just became necessary in order to pursure my path.

Craig
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Old 01-16-2004, 03:20 AM   #28
PeterR
 
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Quote:
Craig Hocker (kironin) wrote:
which is how I ended up running a dojo.

didn't plan on it. Just became necessary in order to pursure my path.
Exactly - we're all creatures of circumstance.

I do think that starting and training in any Budo with a view to being an instructor probably reflects all the wrong reasons or at the very least a misunderstanding of what is involved - no offence to those that do. It's usually just another variation of the hyper-enthusiastic soon to burn out type.

That said - I don't think it takes 10 years to figure out what level of commitment you are willing to give.

I can only advise to put any ideas of being an instructor out of your head for at least the first couple of years. That avoids a related problem - the dreaded 5th kyu Shihan.

Cheers

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 01-16-2004, 10:39 AM   #29
AsimHanif
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Great analogy Erik!
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Old 01-16-2004, 01:30 PM   #30
Jack Simpson
Dojo: Western Maryland Aikikai - Frederick, Maryland
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Uriah,

I wouldn't worry about Fuku, Shidoin, Sensei..... If you're committed (and who among us that have trained for awhile shouldn't be ) the ranks and titles will take care of themselves. For now, and then, train hard.

Besides, by the time you're ready, who knows what the requirements will be. I know I had particular troubles with the "randori against mounted samurai with uzi's" part of my test ;-).

Jack

P.S. If you end up at Aikido of Park Slope say hi to Hal for me. I got the opportunity to train with him in Bermuda and had a great time.
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Old 01-16-2004, 01:51 PM   #31
Jack Simpson
Dojo: Western Maryland Aikikai - Frederick, Maryland
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...and in case you're wondering, I have no idea what the requirements were for obtaining my fukushidoin certification (USAF-ER). I asked Clyde (Takeguchi Sensei) if I needed to write an essay or something and he just smiled. But then he smiles at most things. Good luck and did I mention, train hard ?

Jack
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Old 01-16-2004, 04:05 PM   #32
kironin
 
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Quote:
Asim Hanif (AsimHanif) wrote:
Great analogy Erik!
except

they are thrilled because the likelihood of making a decent living from a college education is a lot higher than from obtaining an aikido teaching certificate.

There are teachers in my region trying to make a living at teaching aikido. In one case it was a childhood ambition fulfilled. I look upon them as the blessed insane. I hope they can succeed but the commercial aspect of needing to put food on the table for your family has certainly created problems in those dojos. Running a dojo for profit is in my experience a bit of a culture clash with the general aikido culture. Those who pull it off successfully are very few.

I think it's great that a student loves aikido so much that they want to teach it to others. As long as they channel that desire into being a dedicated student, it's simply great. It's just when a beginner starts talking about having their own school that I think they have either been touched by the pixies or on the dark side a potential to be a future problem.

Too often in the martial arts, it occurs that a student doesn't have the patience to train long enough. Many quit but for some others... Just this past month, a friend sent me the website of this 20-something kid who had spent a few years (2-3) getting a karate shodan with a local respected teacher and then went out on his own to start a new school, got an organization to give him a 10th dan rank of his new improved karate style and calls himself 'soke'. Opened new family oriented school, created fancy website, etc.

of course the commericalism already present in karate means it's possible to make a pretty good living if you cater to kids like he is doing.

If someone aspires to teach because they love the art, great. You don't have to run a dojo to do that. Many dojos would love to add classes taught by someone who is qualified and loves to do it. On the other hand, if you are a beginner and that doesn't appeal to you as much as having your own dojo, I think it's only natural for a teacher to wonder about your reasons.

You may turn out to have good reasons, but there is no shortage of bad ones IMHO.

Craig
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Old 01-16-2004, 06:08 PM   #33
Morpheus
Dojo: Aikido of Park Slope
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I was thinking this a few days ago, but today's posts have convinced me of this. How many people who've read this thread are/were thinking that it is being posted by a teenager or a "20 something"?

Neither applies.

I look toward later on, particularly when retirement comes around. I'm not looking to be sitting around twiddling my thumbs. I'd taken jujutsu before this, and plan to continue to cross train later after I've built proper habits in Aikido (years from now, at least Dan level) don't want to have a clash of methods to confuse me.

For those of you who've heard of or met Sensei Luqman Abdul Hakeem, we've got a connection by marriage so, watching his classes years ago and of course speaking to him, planted the seeds so to speak.

I have at minimum 18 more years before retirement (early retirement for me is 55 + new baby = 58 years old). So why train at all if there is no intent to pass Aikido on to another generation and to stay active in the later years?

I'm not offended, so no one should get that impression. However, for those who have so much more experience, assumptions about someone's motives should be reserved until they get to know more about the person. I welcome any dialogue on this.

Last edited by Morpheus : 01-16-2004 at 06:12 PM.

Qasim

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"If the enemy thinks of the mountains, attack like the sea; and if he thinks of the sea, attack like the mountains. - Miyamoto Musashi - 1584 - 1645
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Old 01-16-2004, 08:34 PM   #34
PeterR
 
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Quote:
Uriah Gardner (Morpheus) wrote:
I was thinking this a few days ago, but today's posts have convinced me of this. How many people who've read this thread are/were thinking that it is being posted by a teenager or a "20 something"?
Pretty much all of us - sorry.

I still think starting Aikido with a view to being an instructor is premature - but in light of your post - go for it.

Cheers

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 01-16-2004, 08:59 PM   #35
rachmass
Dojo: Aikido of Cincinnati/Huron Valley Aikikai
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pardon in advance

Hello Morpheus

Pardon this extremely long response, but your last response to this post made me wonder what happened that got under your skin. I have cut and paste snippets of the conversation in trying to figure out what happened.

The quote that started the thread:
Quote:
I'm getting ready to begin studying Aikido with the intention of eventually teaching and running a dojo (however many years that will be in the future).
response:
Quote:
Don't get ahead of yourself. ^_- It will probably be quite a while before you're ready to open a dojo.
Now this wasn't a negative comment, just an observation based on experience that it takes a long time to get to that point.
Quote:
The length of time it takes you to be able to be proficient enough to start a dojo is really quite individual. Going into aikido with the idea that you want to be a teacher is quite premature IMHO. I've been practicing regularly since 1982(3) and only started teaching in 1994(5). I didn't open a dojo until 2002. When I started, teaching was about the furthest thing from my mind. It has just been a natural progression of my practice.
This was my comment, which was that it is a long haul and it was not on my mind when I started; it was a personal response, which I think is what you were looking for.
Quote:
I think it is ok for someone to train with the goal of someday being a teacher. A lot of wishful thinking would be clarified if people did this I think.
The above is a thoughtful response from an experienced teacher.
Quote:
Yes, firecrackers usually disappears without a trace
Quote:
The candle will burn out longer and illuminates more
two comments that were more towards the discussion that Mr. Ledyard and I were involved in rather than the comments to your questions.
Quote:
It's certainly good to have long term goals as long as one has realistic short term goals that will eventually result in getting there.
Good obeservation
Quote:
If a new student says they want to become a teacher and have their own dojo, then I would simply remind them that they need look at their schedule, commit themselves weekly to a minimum number of classes and to being at all the seminars we have
also a good observation
Quote:
If a child or teenager said they wanted to be a school teacher when they grew up we'd support them and think it's a good thing. Show up at a college with the same attitude and we'd be thrilled.
this is true, but I think for a large part it is answered by the quote three down.
Quote:
As for someone starting Aikido with the ambition of being a teacher; why not? Providing they are prepared to work at it over a long period they should acheive their goal.
Quote:
I wouldn't worry about Fuku, Shidoin, Sensei..... If you're committed (and who among us that have trained for awhile shouldn't be ) the ranks and titles will take care of themselves. For now, and then, train hard.
Quote:
I think it's great that a student loves aikido so much that they want to teach it to others. As long as they channel that desire into being a dedicated student, it's simply great. It's just when a beginner starts talking about having their own school that I think they have either been touched by the pixies or on the dark side a potential to be a future problem.
Quote:
I'm not offended, so no one should get that impression. However, for those who have so much more experience, assumptions about someone's motives should be reserved until they get to know more about the person. I welcome any dialogue on this.
As Mr. Rehse pointed out, we probably all thought you were a younger bloke or teenager. This has been a common subject on this forum by some younger members. Thank you for explaining yourself.

In any case, remember this forum is for people to exchange thoughts and opinions, and so it is natural that there will be disagreement. I think you got a good cross section of opinions from a bunch of folks, at least 4 teachers included.

You are fortunate to be located in an area with very good aikido, and should have a very enjoyable experience with the art. Hope to meet you some day on the mat

best, Rachel
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Old 01-16-2004, 10:09 PM   #36
Morpheus
Dojo: Aikido of Park Slope
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Talking Re: pardon in advance

I said, "I'm not offended, so no one should get that impression."
Quote:
Rachel Massey (rachmass) wrote:
Hello Morpheus

Pardon this extremely long response, but your last response to this post made me wonder what happened that got under your skin.
Nothing got under my skin. Just making the observation that assumptions were made.

If we meet on the mat any time this year, I'll be the 40 year old taking it one day at a time, working hard, and to quote Maxwell Smart, "...and loving it."

Thanks

Last edited by Morpheus : 01-16-2004 at 10:16 PM.

Qasim

**************************************
"If the enemy thinks of the mountains, attack like the sea; and if he thinks of the sea, attack like the mountains. - Miyamoto Musashi - 1584 - 1645
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Old 01-18-2004, 12:32 AM   #37
SmilingNage
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Its healthy to have teaching aspirations. Its a funny thing, in the early ranks there is the feeling of "knowing" something about Aikido. But the more time I spend with Aikido, the more I realize the vastness of the Art. My knowledge would be lucky to be considered a damp mark in the bucket, not even enough to be a drop in the bucket; A speck of dampness. (

It's an honor to be asked to teach Aikido. If you have the dream to become a teacher, you should be asked to do so. Drop the notion of one day becoming a teacher and just train with honesty and an open mind. Drop the "wanting" to become a teacher, and become a student. Come to learn without an agenda, then your mind will be open to what is being taught to you.

Dont make me, make you, grab my wrist.
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Old 01-18-2004, 08:15 AM   #38
AsimHanif
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Uriah - I have heard many great things about Luqman Sensei. I have many friends in the Vee Jitsu family who speak well of him. In fact my first aikido instructor Irving Faust, was his student.

Someone once said to me - when searching for an instructor ask yourself, if he/she wasn't doing martial arts for a living what would they be doing? Keeping that in mind has always helped me not only find good instruction but to also watch myself.

I had 2 dojos in Harlem before I moved to VA but I always had other sources of income. I too am not a "spring chicken" and have to provide for a family. I agree with Craig Hocker that if you rely on just teaching there may be times when you have to "sell out" to make ends meet.

But like academic teaching, I consider aikido instruction like any other form of social work. Underappreciated, underpaid, but extremely necessary.

BTW - take the age assumptions as a compliment. It shows you have that great while belt spirit in life not just aikido.

Peace.
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Old 01-22-2004, 02:52 PM   #39
Morpheus
Dojo: Aikido of Park Slope
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Thanks Asim. I might be speaking to him this afternoon. Haven't told him yet that I was going to begin studying Aikido. His son may have already told him though.

Qasim

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"If the enemy thinks of the mountains, attack like the sea; and if he thinks of the sea, attack like the mountains. - Miyamoto Musashi - 1584 - 1645
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