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Old 01-12-2004, 02:53 PM   #76
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
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Hi Larry,

Interestingly enough, I did not have to physically harm the individuals. I don't know if it was how I was constantly taking an angle on their leader, the fact that I was calming my Aunt at the same time I was controling them with body positioning, the fact that they didn't know what was in the pouch I was wearing, or whatever...they changed their minds midstream. Walked all the way across the street for something...then changed their minds and left.

I guess some would think it was the great Aiki...in my mind it was probably

1 part luck

1 part attitude

1 part the possibility of backing it up with physical technique; and making it clear I was willing to do that.

The reality is: I'll never know. Don't much care to find out, either.

Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 01-12-2004, 04:31 PM   #77
Richard Elliott
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[I guess some would think it was the great Aiki...in my mind it was probably

1 part luck

1 part attitude

1 part the possibility of backing it up with physical technique; and making it clear I was willing to do that.

The reality is: I'll never know. Don't much care to find out, either.

Ron[/quote]
Dear Sir:

A better definition and application of humility I haven't heard all week.

Respectfully, Richard
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Old 01-13-2004, 10:00 AM   #78
L. Camejo
 
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Well done Ron, very very well done. As far as I'm concerned, what you did is a major part of what "the higher levels" of Aikido are all about.

It's what I was hoping for in my situation, but I settled for no one being seriosly hurt or dead, even though I lost a few trinkets and some cash.

I think you are perfectly correct in how you view it as well, though I think that the "1 part attitude" plus the "1 part ability and resolution to back it up with action" helped to increase the effect of the "1 part luck" imho.

May I ask a question though, did you find that your Aikido training helped you to stay centred, focussed and relaxed throughout the whole affair, or do you see it as a result of something else?

Hmm, maybe we have discovered the Aikido version of the Jedi mind trick.

L.C.

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
http://www.tntaikido.org
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Old 01-13-2004, 10:49 AM   #79
Ron Tisdale
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Quote:
May I ask a question though, did you find that your Aikido training helped you to stay centred, focussed and relaxed throughout the whole affair, or do you see it as a result of something else?
I believe that the training produced just what you stated. Some years ago, my response to threat was to loose my temper, channel the adrenalin dump as best I could, and basically go ape on the threat. The problem with such a response is that if the advisary timed their actions for the shakiness and weakness that comes after such a dump, I was easy to defeat. Not to mention that a truly experienced fighter didn't even have to wait...they would take advantage of the obvious flaws I presented in that state.

I was pretty amazed to *not* ever feel the results of said adrenalin dump, during or after the event. I believe that was the closest to 'mushin' I've ever felt. It even surpassed the feeling I've had on the odd aikido test. I guess there really is something to spending several years 3 to 5 times a week having someone throw punches, kicks and grabs at you without you losing your temper that acclimates you to some stressfull situations.

I found it quite remarkable, really. I'm glad the cost of experiencing it was so low.

Richard,

Thanks, and Osu! I will strive to live up to your compliment.

Ron

Ron Tisdale
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"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 01-13-2004, 10:56 AM   #80
Ron Tisdale
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Quote:
It's what I was hoping for in my situation, but I settled for no one being seriosly hurt or dead, even though I lost a few trinkets and some cash.
Wait a minute...there were guns involved, and all that resulted was you lost some 'trinkets and some cash'? Hey, it doesn't get any better than that. Talk about 'high level aikido'...

RT

Ron Tisdale
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"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
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Old 01-14-2004, 05:50 AM   #81
L. Camejo
 
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Talking

Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote:
Wait a minute...there were guns involved, and all that resulted was you lost some 'trinkets and some cash'? Hey, it doesn't get any better than that. Talk about 'high level aikido'...

RT
What can I say, I'm a compulsive perfectionist .

The reason I asked the question earlier is because a similar thing happened after my encounter. When the cops came to take reports and stuff I was a bit taken aback to realise that they did not go to the Security guard (who was in tears and saying that she will not ever come back to work there), but the detective came directly to me and started asking questions. Maybe it was because I appeared calm or something - the whole episode had a sort of ethereal feel to it for me - like you said earlier, some sort of mushin, or maybe just detachment from the energetics of the conflict.

Reminds me of something in The Book of Five Rings - it is important for a warrior to see close things as if they are far away, and far off things as if they are close.

Any other thoughts?

L.C.

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
http://www.tntaikido.org
http://www.mushinkan.ca
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Old 01-14-2004, 07:13 AM   #82
Reuben Lee
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This post are my comments towards the first page of posts for this particular thread.

Uke is a performance standard for AIkido. AIkido is AIkido. If I specify the benefits of being an uke, the page will go on and on.

Perhaps ukemi is not a performance standard for other martial arts, (no wrong done there), but it is for Aikido.

Because learning ukemi brings various benefits, I say it is not mere "show".

One of the benefits is that it trains reaction. I will not go into details. But if we pause and think, it is true.

Sensitivity to the nage is built by being a uke. Sensitivity towards your opponent in real combat is built by being a uke . Observe the parallel statements.

And Assim, personally, yes . I think that we need a degree of "love" . Why? Well , the founder wanted Aikido to be a martial art that expresses his spiritual principles. His Art, his call.

Wether following the 'way' brings more power in technique will be a topic of hot debate online . I decline to give my opinon on this one.

Good question.

Last edited by Reuben Lee : 01-14-2004 at 07:17 AM.
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Old 01-14-2004, 12:04 PM   #83
AsimHanif
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I'm not disagreeing with you Reuben but when you say you believe there should be a degree of love because the Founder said so - isn't there anymore to it than that?

If you look at the the different Zen schools, there are contrasts in the study of the "way", but all have the same goal. Some use the "whipping stick" more, some use sitting meditation more, some koans more, etc. Aikido is the same. When I was with the Aikikai it was common to hear "use your hips more". In the Ki Society it is common to hear "extend ki". Ki could be interpreted as love, energy, or focus but the emphasis on hips appears to be more of a physical tool.
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Old 01-18-2004, 03:40 AM   #84
Reuben Lee
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QUOTE="Asim Hanif (AsimHanif)"]I'm not disagreeing with you Reuben but when you say you believe there should be a degree of love because the Founder said so - isn't there anymore to it than that?

If you look at the the different Zen schools, there are contrasts in the study of the "way", but all have the same goal. Some use the "whipping stick" more, some use sitting meditation more, some koans more, etc. Aikido is the same. When I was with the Aikikai it was common to hear "use your hips more". In the Ki Society it is common to hear "extend ki". Ki could be interpreted as love, energy, or focus but the emphasis on hips appears to be more of a physical tool.[/quote]
Asim, yes of course , I agree with you totally.

What I meant was that love is one of the ingredients to acheive the highest levels of Aikido.

About what the other ingredients are to reach the highest levels, I don't see myself as competent enough to discuss ,let alone comment.

And that is another very good question : what are the other components that take us to acheive the highest levels of Aikido ?
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Old 01-18-2004, 09:13 AM   #85
indomaresa
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there's probably never been a 'highest' level of aikido nor will there be. O'sensei also said so on his last day that 'I have just started aikido'

or something similar to that effect.

Unless there's a way to brain transplant a shihan's brain into a newbie with great physical condition, I don't think we'll ever see the highest level of aikido anytime soon.

As for what other components will enable us to achieve the highest level, I think it's 'time'.

The road is long...
The path is steep...
So hire a guide to show you the shortcuts
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