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Old 11-18-2003, 01:23 AM   #26
Nafis Zahir
 
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Shihonage is great. It's devestating when done properly. But my favorite is kotegaishi, followed by irimi nage. After that, it's (sorry if spelling is wrong) udi garame. I just learned how to do shihonage when the kotegaishi doesn't take. There again, devestating!

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Old 11-18-2003, 01:49 AM   #27
boni tongson
 
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does anyone like sankyo? i love performing sankyo nage, a hair raising experience for the uke hehe

Weak hearts and flesh do not exist where undaunted spirits dwell!
-PMA
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Old 11-18-2003, 08:04 AM   #28
markwalsh
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I've heard that you shouldn't have a favourite technique, and I can see the logic in this, all being related and leading to lopsidedness etc, but hell...shouldn't never could with me!

On the other hand I've also heard it said (Grapevine sensei down the pub said) that O'Sensei's favourite technique was irimi nage, or ikkyo.

I go through phases where I like one technique before I figure out why I'm rubbish at it and move on to a new pet waza. Same with ones I don't like.

Mark

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Old 11-28-2003, 08:46 AM   #29
Ali B
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Ikkyo is always my fav...Closely followed by nikkyo, sankyo, yonkyo

Love and light

Ali
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Old 11-30-2003, 01:54 AM   #30
Dardempale73
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Cool favorite moves

I'm comfortable doing "kaiten nage", easy to execute..
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Old 12-10-2003, 06:54 AM   #31
indomaresa
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I thought kaitenage is the world's most complicated move... ever

I like hiji-jime

The road is long...
The path is steep...
So hire a guide to show you the shortcuts
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Old 12-10-2003, 01:06 PM   #32
Jeff Tibbetts
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It's been said that one should focus on practising their least favorite technique whenever opportunity arrives. Too much reinforcement of your favorite will weaken you. Eventually, once you've been doing your least favorite for a while it will become your favorite. Over a long enough time, all the techniques form a dynamic love/hate cycle which imprints them stronger in you. This makes a great deal of sense to me, and I've been trying to work on it. It seems to me that I've gone through a period of hate/love with Irimi, Tenchi Nage, and now I'm currently in the hate category with Nikyu, but I'm working on it. Anyone else do this, or remember where it came from?

I cannot remember where I read it, but I know it was in a book

If the Nightingale doesn't sing-
wait
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Old 12-10-2003, 06:57 PM   #33
Aristeia
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Quote:
Maresa Sumardi (indomaresa) wrote:
I thought kaitenage is the world's most complicated move... ever
Only as Kihon. It's derivatives are amongst the most simple and effective techniques we've got IMHO

"When your only tool is a hammer every problem starts to look like a nail"
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Old 12-10-2003, 08:40 PM   #34
Bushi
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I think shihonage is probably my best tecnique. It seems to work realy well for short people like me
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Old 12-11-2003, 09:19 AM   #35
JasonB
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I just learned 6 ways to do Shiho-nage so I'm pretty psyched about that technique right now. It seems like doing it different ways helps you to do each individual version better by illustrating the differances in movement.

Probably the technique that I'm most committed to right now is Irimi-nage because I keep screwing up the ending by rotating my upper torso too soon. I'm hoping that the light bulb comes on soon because I can't figure out why I can't stop making this mistake.
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Old 12-11-2003, 11:55 AM   #36
Nick Simpson
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Shihonage is a nice technique, but mine sucks

I can never seem to control an arkward (the best kind ) uke effectively if I do it the traditional way we are supposed to. A more direct variation where I crank on uke's wrist more and force it into their side thereby standing them up on their toes and unbalancing them seems to work much better, it seems to use the pain as a submission, but it's no good for gradings. I suppose I just have to work on my Kuzushi...

They're all screaming about the rock n roll, but I would say that it's getting old. - REFUSED.
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Old 12-11-2003, 03:46 PM   #37
Aristeia
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Quote:
Nick Simpson wrote:
Shihonage is a nice technique, but mine sucks

I can never seem to control an arkward (the best kind ) uke effectively if I do it the traditional way we are supposed to. A more direct variation where I crank on uke's wrist more and force it into their side thereby standing them up on their toes and unbalancing them seems to work much better, it seems to use the pain as a submission, but it's no good for gradings. I suppose I just have to work on my Kuzushi...
By awkward uke, you mean one that is spinning out? Try this, just as you've extended them and are about to pivot (tenkai), tell uke to come around and hit you with the other hand.

contrary to the oft reapeated claim that beginners are good to train with becuase they are natural, I've decided that things like spinning out of shiho nage are often because uke is too passive and not continuing the attack. tell uke to try and hit you as you apply the technique and I think it'll work better.

"When your only tool is a hammer every problem starts to look like a nail"
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Old 12-12-2003, 01:52 AM   #38
Bronson
 
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Quote:
Michael Fooks (Aristeia) wrote:
I've decided that things like spinning out of shiho nage are often because uke is too passive and not continuing the attack.
Quite agree.

One thing I've found that helps keep uke from spinning out is to keep their hand at or below the level of the their shoulder. It makes it very difficult for them to get their head under their arm.

Bronson

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
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Old 12-13-2003, 03:39 PM   #39
Kensai
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NIKKYO NIKKYO NIKKYO..............

............ HERE COMES THE PAIN!

Plus its really cool if you can do a throw from it to and its a great way to access lots of other techniques, like Ikkyo, Kote gaeshi and shihonage.

"Minimum Effort, Maximum Effciency."
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Old 12-13-2003, 06:14 PM   #40
MaryKaye
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I like kokyunage, especially the ones where "if only you had just let go of me you would have been fine" (at least at slow speeds). A particular current favorite is katate ryote mochi kokyunage enundo, because the way uke suddenly turns around is good for such a startled expression. I love seeing those big round eyes.

My current least favorite is zenpo-nage, because somehow there is nothing more lame than a zenpo-nage that doesn't work. I got thrown a bit too hard by someone else, and asked sensei how to do abreakfall from zenpo-nage; instead she chose to show me how not to allow that to be done to me. All she really ended up showing me was that if a fourth dan resists being thrown by a fifth kyu, the throw is going to be particularly laughable....

Mary Kaye
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Old 12-14-2003, 06:46 AM   #41
Nick Simpson
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Thanks for the points Michael and Bronson, I'll try it out on monday. I had a pretty good time with Shihonage on friday night, I noticed two beginners doing it without taking uke's balance so that it ended in a stalemate, uke standing up straight and tori trying to muscle them down.

I managed to take both of their balance several times and even if I messed up the shihonage itself, I illustrated how it didnt matter becuase uke was off balance and falling or open to another technique (good way to cover your mistakes eh? ). I also showed them the variation where you crank on ukes wrist more and force their elbow into them, I think I must have been inspired that night

The problem though is a young lad whos about 11 or 12, he spins out of shihonage, and obviously I cant crank it onto him like I can put it onto an adult who is of similar size to myself. I illustrated the fact that if he spins out I can choke him from behind or that if I was to do a practical shihonage on him it would break his arm (he seemed to like that, bloodthirsty little git) but he continued to spin until my sensei was forced to try it on him whereby he had to basically kokyunage the kid because he would hurt him if he forced the shihonage. I think we have to teach this kid some more respect...

They're all screaming about the rock n roll, but I would say that it's getting old. - REFUSED.
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Old 12-14-2003, 08:41 AM   #42
MaryKaye
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Think of it as a real challenge in finding a way to adapt your technique to uke....

We had a Japanese woman student who was cooperative and helpful, but so short and so extremely flexible that a wide variety of moves just didn't work on her. You'd bend her wrist back to an alarming degree, and unless she'd been instructed to go down anyway, she'd just stand there watching you in fascination to see what you'd do next.

Shihonage in particular is great for a shorter person against a taller one, and harder the other way around. She could throw me shihonage with ease and grace, whereas if I started turning with her she'd helpfully follow me, and there was no telling what configuration we'd end up in. The one thing that helped a bit was keeping very close to her, with no slack in the arms--actually bumping her with my shoulder.

Maybe the thing to try with your kid is to alternate the shihonage (where he really does have a natural advantage) with some throw that favors the larger and taller person, like tenchinage....

Mary Kaye
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Old 01-05-2004, 12:21 PM   #43
Vincent Munoz
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opinion

my favorite is sankyo, because from sankyo - it is very easy to divert to any technique. and once you're doing sankyo, u'll have all the control of your uke if you do it right. no one can reverse me if i use sankyo. i think all of you will agree.

in tsuke and shomenuchi attack, my favorite is kokyu nage (180 degress), throwing your uke at your back.

thanks
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Old 01-05-2004, 12:38 PM   #44
Vincent Munoz
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ukemi as important as nage

i noticed that most of you guys are just FINE TUNING the nage thing. DON'T FORGET THAT UKEMI IS AS IMPORTANT AS NAGE, one can never be a good nage if he/she don't fine tune the ukemi. Agree? Everybody can practice any technique with great speed but at the same time, graceful once all are good ukemi.

so practice both. burn a fire of interest.

bong munoz
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Old 01-25-2004, 11:20 AM   #45
Gilles D'Hoker
 
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Ikkyo, performed slow or fast. It's the most effective and a begining to other moves... for me, of course
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Old 01-26-2004, 10:16 AM   #46
morex
 
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Gotta love kote gaeshi!

Morex
ICQ 25185640

"Truth is the only casualty of war"
Marathon
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Old 02-11-2004, 08:13 PM   #47
Amassus
 
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I like how some people mention that a particular move is easier to get other moves from. Aren't we supposed to blend from one technique to another no matter what they may be?

Keep on training!

"flows like water, reflects like a mirror, and responds like an echo." Chaung-tse
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Old 02-12-2004, 06:02 AM   #48
happysod
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Quote:
Aren't we supposed to blend from one technique to another no matter what they may be?
The main blending should be with your partner, so their current position/style of attack should provide you with the most appropriate response. If you decide upon the technique you're going to use in advance, especially in randori, you're not blending.

caveat: unless you're actually specifically practicing one particular technique
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