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Old 12-02-2000, 08:02 AM   #26
Kolschey
Location: RI
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I keep on hearing these descriptions of
crazed, armed, drug addicted mutant cyborg (ok, i'm being silly here) attackers that Aikido is inadequate to deal with, I feel that we are starting to fall into a good deal of the hyperbole that I see in various martial arts advertisement. If your objective is to become proficient in critically damaging another person in a very short time, then Aikido may not be ideal. It is not military CQB training, though it may serve as part of a hand to hand training curriculum. One must reccognise that while it may be useful to develop "hard hitting" skills ( I practiced Shotokan for several years and found it to be a good and substantial art) One also must recognise that we live in an EXTREMELY litigous society. I wounder how many of the people who enjoy talking about the maximum destructive effectiveness needed to take out one of these supercriminals has ever had the pleasure of being subjected to a deposition for a lawsuit, or faced a prosecuting attorney in a criminal case.
Suddenly, nondestructive options that require a bit longer to develop don't seem like such a silly and useless idea.

Krzysztof M. Mathews
" For I am the Cat who walks by himself, and all places are alike to me" -Rudyard Kipling
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Old 12-02-2000, 08:54 AM   #27
George S. Ledyard
 
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Reality Zone

Quote:
Suru wrote:
One of the most important reasons for my doubts of Aikido's effectiveness lies in the difference between a practice situation and a real situation.
---Drew
Now this is correct. But it is equally true for every martial art out there. Peyton Quinn has authored a book called:
Real Fighting: Adrenaline Stress Conditioning Through Scenario Based Training (if you want to check it out go to http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/IS...kidoeastsideA/

Peyton did some amazing experiments. One involved having a group of trained shooters do a scenario with the armored assailant in which he attacked with a bladed weapon of some sort. He put them up against a group of people who had never shot before but had done a weekend of scenario training with the "bulletman" as they call the armored guy. Of the five shooters, not one put a shot on center mass, one dropped his gun when he tried to access it, and the other didn't even clear leather. Of the non-experienced shooters,4 out of 5 hit center mass and the fifth hit the weapons delivery arm and was assumed to have survived the attack as well.

The effects of the adrenaline dump that takes place in a real confrontation are debilitating. They include loss of fine motor control, tunnel vision, unconscious action, etc. This can make an attempt at anything like an Aikido joint lock impossible if one hasn't learned to handle the "dump". What Peyton Quinn has said is that the training offered by those who do the scenario based training allows the student to increasingly quickly recover from the effects of the adrenaline dump and not lose as much of heir functioning when it does happen.

The reason for the standard military unarmed combat training being so simplistic is due to this factor. They won't train enough to develop the ability to not get the "dump" as in the classical martial arts of Japan which stressed fudoshin or immoveable mind so the techniques need to be big muscle group techniques that don't need fine motor skills. Same is true for Model Mugging and the derivative systems for women's self defense.

Now the fact that this aspect of training is not really covered by the typical training offered in the kind of educated middle class Aikido dojo that would represent the typical model these days is not the fault of the art. It is not Aikido that doesn't work; it is the practitioners that are not training to be able to do the art in that kind of context. No one would argue that firearms don't work. Yet there is a huge gap between those who do effective combat firearms training and those who go to the range regularly (despite the fine marksmenship (of the latter).

There seem to be a lot of people who post to this forum who are interested in the martial side of the art. They would do well to educate themselves about this aspect of training. Peyton Quinn's book is a very good place to start and I can't recommend it enough.


[Edited by George S. Ledyard on December 2, 2000 at 09:10am]

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
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Old 12-02-2000, 02:51 PM   #28
AikiTom
Dojo: Aikido Martial Arts Center
Location: Blue Grass, IA
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Lightbulb

Drew, you're back! I see your bi-polar phase is now manic. You're not one of those ballot counters eating chads are you ?
I agree with Jun - perhaps your Aikido doesn't work. Be patient, as I remember you've only done aikido a year or less. As the body learns, the mind will understand. gOOD LUCK!

May the force be with you!
AikiTom
"Be the change you want to see."
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Old 12-02-2000, 04:16 PM   #29
Suru
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AikiTom,

Remember that mania is often accompanied by delusions of grandeur. You seem to have a magical ability to diagnose upon reading a few comments. That's some ability of yours!! I've learned in my psychology classes in college that projection is a common mental mistake. I think it has something to do with fighting loneliness. We can be friends, but please don't project your pshychosis onto me!

---Drew
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Old 12-02-2000, 05:33 PM   #30
les paul
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Quote:
crystalwizard wrote:
Quote:
les paul wrote:
never knowing Ki is simply the combimation of technique, willpower, and skill.

You have a little bit to learn if you believe that is all it is.
I guess the 15 years of XingYi and Bagua tought me nothing about Chi/ki.

Yea right.....not!

You have a little to learn about "REALITY".

With a name like crystalwizard I hope your not one of the mystic wacko's I was talking about. I find them all like children playing in a small sand box oblivious to the rest of the playground.

Let me give you a real not so mystic message

Lao Tzu in the Hua Hu Ching once said "The Road Your Traveling Doesn't Exsist"

Some real advise

Budo is Budo nothing more..... nothing less......

Paul Calugaru
Michigan
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Old 12-02-2000, 06:39 PM   #31
AikiTom
Dojo: Aikido Martial Arts Center
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Cool

dbgard: Ibbidah

Planets move,
Oceans race,
Winds calm with soothing breeze.

May the force be with you!
AikiTom
"Be the change you want to see."
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Old 12-02-2000, 08:12 PM   #32
crystalwizard
Dojo: Aikido of Dallas
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Quote:
les paul wrote:


I guess the 15 years of XingYi and Bagua tought me nothing about Chi/ki.
As evidenced by your previous post it didn't.

Quote:
les paul wrote:

With a name like crystalwizard I hope your not one of the mystic wacko's I was talking about. I find them all like children playing in a small sand box oblivious to the rest of the playground.
It didn't do much for your attitude either. I might suggest you dont be so hasty in judgement. My handle has nothing to do with what you surmise.
I have to wonder if you have actualy gotten to know any of the 'mystic wackos' you have judged before judging them or not. Matters not really. I find your attitude to be a lot like a small child. A child that doesn't understand the new kid from a different culture that just walked into his school and so he starts taunting, bullying and making fun of the new kid instead of trying to get to know and understand the differnces between them.

Quote:
les paul wrote:

Let me give you a real not so mystic message

Lao Tzu in the Hua Hu Ching once said "The Road Your Traveling Doesn't Exsist"

Some real advise
Let me give you a very real non-mystic message:
"I know you believe you understand what you think I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."

Frankly, I'm relieved you didn't learn anything more than you did in those 15 years.


____________
Kelly Christiansen

A loving person lives in a loving world. A hostile person lives in a hostile world. Everyone you meet is your mirror
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Old 12-02-2000, 11:36 PM   #33
les paul
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Quote:
crystalwizard wrote:
Quote:
les paul wrote:


I guess the 15 years of XingYi and Bagua tought me nothing about Chi/ki.
As evidenced by your previous post it didn't.

Quote:
les paul wrote:

With a name like crystalwizard I hope your not one of the mystic wacko's I was talking about. I find them all like children playing in a small sand box oblivious to the rest of the playground.
It didn't do much for your attitude either. I might suggest you dont be so hasty in judgement. My handle has nothing to do with what you surmise.
I have to wonder if you have actualy gotten to know any of the 'mystic wackos' you have judged before judging them or not. Matters not really. I find your attitude to be a lot like a small child. A child that doesn't understand the new kid from a different culture that just walked into his school and so he starts taunting, bullying and making fun of the new kid instead of trying to get to know and understand the differnces between them.

Quote:
les paul wrote:

Let me give you a real not so mystic message

Lao Tzu in the Hua Hu Ching once said "The Road Your Traveling Doesn't Exsist"

Some real advise
Let me give you a very real non-mystic message:
"I know you believe you understand what you think I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."

Frankly, I'm relieved you didn't learn anything more than you did in those 15 years.

This is one wacked out post. You highlighted my post first. Remeber? Or did you forget? Second, It was you that wrote condescendingly "you have a little bit to learn if you believe that is all it (ki/chi) is". So if I have an attitude you gave it to me.

How am I bullying you? I'd love for you to explain it to me. While your at it please tell me what I have to learn about chi/ki? Let me guess you know someone who can fire mystic power balls out of their butt! In my 15+ years I've never seen one ki/chi feat I couldn't explain. What I've mostly seen is a bunch of people short on technique/skill and experience talking a lot about ki/chi and what it can do, but for some reason are at a loss to give/show examples. Take your mystical mojo bones and leave me be. You don't like what I got to say, don't comment on it!

Budo is Budo nothing more..... nothing less......

Paul Calugaru
Michigan
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Old 12-03-2000, 12:19 AM   #34
crystalwizard
Dojo: Aikido of Dallas
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Quote:
les paul wrote:
You don't like what I got to say, don't comment on it!
interesting response. Very....unaikido in nature...and tell me how is it that you are allowed to comment on what I say that you dont like but i'm not allowed to comment on what you say?

I think...when you've had some sleep, maybe some food and perhaps a chance to get your balance back you might want to go re-read your post and think about your displayed attitude.

____________
Kelly Christiansen

A loving person lives in a loving world. A hostile person lives in a hostile world. Everyone you meet is your mirror
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Old 12-03-2000, 06:20 AM   #35
aikilouis
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Who said Aikido was meant to avoid head-on confrontation ? Sorry to interrupt your constructive debate. Please go on.

LR Joseph
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Old 12-03-2000, 11:24 AM   #36
Nacho
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Thumbs up not like this

Les paul, I know that you must be a lethal warrior, maybe about to write "The art of war 2", but if you have practiced aikido, you are showing that you haven't learned much from it. I'm not talking technically, i'm talking about your attitude. How can you learn if you already know everything?
The way you are replying to cristalwizard isn't very polite. That's not the way to share ideas, to discuss about something.
Besides, if you didn't learned anything about ki, it doesn't mean that it is b/s.
You agreed with the one who said "I think Aikido isn't effective, I never practiced Aikido...". I don't need to explain what I think about that, i think everybody already knows.
Being hostile with others won't make you a wise guru of real martial fighting.

Ignacio Weinberg
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Old 12-03-2000, 12:27 PM   #37
Nick
Dojo: Aikido of Greater Atlanta
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Ian-

you may disagree with someone else's views, but at least try to respect them. Aikido, and all budo, are about respect, for yourself and even (god forbid) your enemies.

For all you know, someone may think of you as a "mystic wacko".

Nick

---
Nick Porter
"Do not fall into the trap of the artisan who boasts twenty years of experience, when in fact he has had only one year of experience-- twenty times."
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Old 12-04-2000, 11:17 AM   #38
Guest5678
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Quote:
NYFE Man wrote:
Utter newbie voicing an opinion here.

It seems from the little experience I've had, and the reading that I've done, that the ultimate goal of Aikido is to be so in harmony with all things that there is no reason that you WOULD be attacked.

"First master the techniques of Aiki
The way of the Gods
Then no enemy will ever attack"


Unfortunately, there is such macho posturing about EVERYTHING, especially here in the US, that the concept of using your mind to avoid a fight is seen as cowardice and therefore the erstwhile Aikidoka is goaded into "proving" that his technique works, and actually moves away from the true spirit of the form. No wonder they fail.

It seems to me that truly mastering of Aikido would mean that you would never have gotten to the place that you need to use it.

Al Foote III
The Utter Newbie
Dear Al,

One should also consider that there is a clear difference between deciding upon avoidance and just plain running away. In regard to the founders quotes, I can't figure out half of what he was trying to say, it's all too Japanese for my little mind to untangle. I just know that when I avoid a "situation" it's because I'm making a choice and not because I have no alternative. If you consider that macho then so be it but personally, I believe you must first learn to deal with a fight before you can make the decision not to. Otherwise, you're just another delusional victim.

Train hard, Play hard, Live easy.

Dan P. - Mongo
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Old 12-04-2000, 10:01 PM   #39
jimvance
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I have read a lot of this posting and am happy to say this is the first time to post something in this site. I am amazed that my sensei has not posted anything here, because this is usually the kind of juicy subject he likes. I believe Aikido is combat effective. In fact, I believe Aiki IS combat effectiveness. Whether or not your training has aiki is another matter. I believe that the most important element in the whole equation of whether or not Aikido can be seen as combat effective lies within the role uke plays in kata practice and how that translates into randori. Most of the Aikido world looks at uke as the weaker position, because in kata uke is designed to lose. This could not be farther from the truth when it becomes applied to a real situation, and I will explain why.
Traditionally in most Japanese ryu the uke (uchi-tachi) is the senior student; they control the energy of the kata. Uchi tachi initiates the conflict with a committed attack and stays engaged and dangerous throughout the kata, probing for weaknesses in the junior's technique. This gives feedback to the junior, strengthening their ability and promoting confidence in not only the movement, but also in the entire conflict situation. They are constaintly pushed by the seniors, even though the senior is in the position of the "loser".
In the Aikido world,the role of uke and the action of ukemi have become less a method of feedback and more a system of promoting conditioned response, e.g. "Uke does X, I respond with Y, uke falls down or submits". If the uke was allowed to counter the tori (nage) when an opening in the kata was detected without breaking the awase of the kata, then we might see a change in the opinion of whether or not Aikido is combat effective. There is no one perfect technique to apply when someone comes after you in a "real world" situation; like someone earlier said, the techniques make themselves. Aside from the fact that learning ukemi properly teaches us to take care of ourselves, it also acts as a feedback device to show the tori (nage) the weak spots in their kata and where they could be countered.
Maybe less ego striving and most real delving into this both in our minds and on the mat will show us more.

Thanks for the first post.

Jim Vance
osento@aol.com
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Old 12-05-2000, 05:03 AM   #40
Anne
Dojo: Kiel University/VfL Fosite Helgoland
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Smile

I´ve found that combat effectiveness depends very much on the style you´re studying. The style we do at our dojo IS COMBAT EFFECTIVE. We do a lot of randori were ALL attacks are allowed. The techniques may not always be as beautiful as during the lesson but it really helps you on how to develop a feeling for what is right in a "violent" situation with multiple attackers. E.g. no matter what attack or how many "bad guys", keep moving.
This approach has already helped my outside the dojo

On the other hand, I´ve trained with people from dojos with a rather meditative approach on aikido. One said that he had been training aikido for seven years and had real problems with ikkyo.
One friend from our group moved to another town and visited several dojos there. In one she was told that aikidoka are peaceful because they know that their techniques wouldn´t work!?!

I think both a combat effective and a meditative approach are part of aikido training and it depends on the dojo you´re training at where on the line between these "poles" your style will be. If you keep this in mind, it´s your choice.

So long,
Anne

"You have to do difficult things to grow." (Shoji Nishio Sensei)
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Old 12-05-2000, 07:28 AM   #41
NYFE Man
Dojo: Bond Street Dojo
Location: New York
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Quote:
Mongo wrote:

Dear Al,

One should also consider that there is a clear difference between deciding upon avoidance and just plain running away. In regard to the founders quotes, I can't figure out half of what he was trying to say, it's all too Japanese for my little mind to untangle. I just know that when I avoid a "situation" it's because I'm making a choice and not because I have no alternative. If you consider that macho then so be it but personally, I believe you must first learn to deal with a fight before you can make the decision not to. Otherwise, you're just another delusional victim.

Train hard, Play hard, Live easy.

Dan P. - Mongo
Dan --

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying avoid "situations" at ALL costs. Heck, if I wanted to do that I'd follow Buddism, that way there would be no real attacks, since none of this is real, anyway!

I'm merely saying that the "my MA is better than your MA" threads that I've seen here and in the newsgroups and discussions I've had outside the computer is often much less a true discussion about the validity of one form's techniques vs. another and more often DOES seem to be about machismo.

There seems to be a general attitude that the gentlemen who started these most recent "Aikido doesn't work" threads are either trolling or are looking for "quick fix" arts that will make them Ultimate Warriors without the hassle of years of training. This doesn't appear to be the mind of someone who wants to know the truth, but more someone who wants their beliefs validated.

Finally, in regards to using O'Sensei's quote -- I don't understand MOST of them! It just seemed poignant.

Yours,

Al Foote III
The Utter Newbie


[Edited by NYFE Man on December 5, 2000 at 08:11am]
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Old 12-05-2000, 08:35 AM   #42
Chuck Clark
 
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Whether aikido or any art or weapon is "combat effective" depends upon the person.

I have seen people who are well trained, armed with state of the art weapons, and seem to be the epitome of a warrior to all who know them fall apart and freeze when push comes to shove in combat.

Another point, combat and a dangerous street encounter are not the same thing in my opinion. Having survived both in my life, I see a real difference.

By the way, no one knows if they will be "combat effective" until truly tested. All the training and mind games put together can run down your leg in an instant.

What we do in the dojo is NOT what we will do in combat or a dangerous / life threatening situation. But, if we train properly, the kata we practice can enable us to make the critical decisions necessary to survive those situations. That, I think, is the best we can do.

(there's not much else to say Jim...)



Regards,

Chuck Clark
Jiyushinkai Aikibudo
www.jiyushinkai.org
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Old 12-05-2000, 11:53 AM   #43
SmilingNage
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this is one of those posts were i dont know if i want to flame it or post something constructive. i guess i will share a little with you as to why i started Aikido.
it all started with a fist fight that i got into or should i say forced into. i was jumped leaving a pick up game of basket ball. you see somebody was mouthing off and stopping game play. so i told him to shut up and play. hetook a cut at me but i side stepped it. and told him i was here to play basket ball not fight. the game ended we won and i left. as i got to my truck i heard a car speeding up behind me. so i dallied abit unlocking the door so i could see what was developing. i certainly didnt want to be tryn to get out of my truck should trouble arrive. sure enough the car sped up and drove pass me and blocked the only way out. i saw this out of the corner of my eye and still made like i was unlocking the dooor; until i heard both car doors swing open. i threw my keys into the bed of my truck and went for the closest guy. who happened to be the driver and not the guy who had thrown a punch at me. well i was on him before he knew it. the idiot had left his selt belt on and couldnt get out. so i immediately went to work on him. and gave him a good beating before i had to turn my attention to the the passenger. to make a long story short, he thought he could box and found out in a hard way he couldnt. i knocked him clean out with the last punch opening a large cut under his eye. then i chased the driver away. he ran for his life because i was madder than all hell. i let him go and got back into my truck and drove home. driving home i had such a wonderful feeling of satisfaction. but it was the first time that i ever felt good about thrashing some one. usually i would have walked away or apologized to keep from fighting, or apologized for thrashing him. but this was the first time i felt great about hurting another and i felt no remorse for doing so. it was the sheer joy of being violent that fueled my excitement. this was the turning point for me. i knew that i had reached an edge; which i should never cross. it was then i noticed what i had done i had set a circle in motion. now that guy was gonna want to get me back, his friends and family too. not to mention the driver and his family and friends. not to mention the embarrassment that guy had to carry with him as undoubtedly had to go to hospital to get stitches. then all his friends and family, co workers would see what had happened to him. it was then that i realized i needed to find a way for self control and discipline.
about a year later my life was in the dumps, various situations had made my life a mess. it was then i found aikido. and given me the gifts that i needed to put my life back together. but u would say what does that have to do with Aikido's combat effectiveness. perhaps nothing, but since then i havent been ina "fight." there have been altercations but i never had to resort to pummelling another person to achieve resolution to the conflict. you need 2 people for a fight. i just dont allow myself to get caught up in the emotion of the conflict anymore.i try to understand and be empathetic. we all have had our moments where we are less than shining. so would i say is Aikido combat effective . i would say yes. its gives you the control and the options needed for "combat." but its more of a" i learned how to fight so i dont have to fight anymore." its worked for me.
i know this doesnt follow the spirit of the thread, but perhaps you can see that a little understanding can help u avoid confrontations. where now both parties can benefit from the meeting

Dont make me, make you, grab my wrist.
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Old 12-05-2000, 02:53 PM   #44
Elie
Dojo: Aikido de la montagne
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Cool

This is the first posting I have ever done and probably the only reason I officially joined this site is to post a reply.

I'd just liked to say that a lot of people say a specific form of martial arts (say aikido) is useless in combat. I totally disagree with that. I used to take karate before and I was shocked when one day I got into a fight (which wasn't is any way my fault) and I managed to take down a guy much stronger than me. Though I never totally mastered karate, I blocked a good number of punches (which I didn't know were coming, I just reacted approprietly), avoided a jump-kick... Training never prepared me for that but you have to learn how to adapt your training to any situation.
Now don't tell me karate isn't aikido cause you're right: aikido is much more powerful. It also requires a lot more patience. But in a fight, the priciples remain the same: position, eye contact, avoid the attack and react.
Finally try telling on of the black belts/ instructor at my dojo that aikido is useless in a fight cause when he is an uke he acts like one, and if you screw up he'll take you down, hard.


Yours,
Elie


[Edited by Elie on December 5, 2000 at 02:55pm]
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Old 12-05-2000, 02:59 PM   #45
chrisinbrasil
Dojo: Lenwakan
Location: Sao Paulo, Brasil
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Cool Train first...

I would give anything for these guys to commit to at least two or three years of training before posting anything.

There was also a post about BJJ being fairly easy to learn quickly, I beg to differ. Like Judo, a student takes an average of 6-7 years to receive their BB (not that it means they´re bad or anything). You may learn the positions quickly, but applying them on an unwilling subject is as difficult as applying technique of any other art on the same.

In general, Aikido can only be used superficially in a fight without many years of training. After you´ve had those many years, you might be able to use only Aikido, but you probably won´t need to cause you´ll avoid the confrontation more effectively. I found the example of Aikidoka being pummeled in real fights to be ironically accurate. The reason, however, is that they tried to use only Aikido against someone who wasn´t gonna let them do some cool joint maneuvers with no resistance before they were prepared to. When I was into kickboxing intensely, I knocked out umpteen boxers and kickboxers then laughed about it, but I got submitted by BJJ when trying to use only kickboxing, and got knocked out when I tried to use only BJJ against an experienced kickboxer. What does all this tell you? That I suck after 10+ years. Humm, maybe... but more accurate might be to say that unless you´re at the top of the martial food chain (which I´m not), you might benefit from defending yourself in ways other than mystical ki projection and the (in)famous fist catching techniques described by so many Aikidoka. Aikido can be used in a fight when timed correctly and usually not as a first resource, rather during a fight when an opportunity presents itself. After years of practice you might reach the plateau of controlling the opponents actions by eluding him into a certain position or action and in essence creating his technique so you know what´s coming and where from. I however cannot yet do this and choose to incorporate Aikido as one of several, not the one true way. Therefore the affirmation that Aikido doesn´t work may only be true because you suck (like me) or because you´ve chosen to use it the wrong way (like by itself before you´re good enough).

I am a firm believer in Aikido as effective simply because I´ve seen it work as the ultimate situation manipulator and fight dissolver. VERY interesting sight.

At your service,
Christopher Wilson
Hito no tachiba wo kanga eru.
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Old 12-05-2000, 03:36 PM   #46
Soulnet
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Well i don't know much about aikido yet but i have a little story for all of you. I used to have a latin teacher for a year (female), that was also an aikido teacher. I heard a nice story about her... One time she was assaulted in the elevator of her appartment by two guys willing to rape her... they both finished in hospital in terrible condition... This story is actually true and shows that aikido could be maybe effective... The thing is i think that lot of people practicing martial arts don't really understand it...
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Old 12-05-2000, 03:38 PM   #47
EAK
Dojo: Genbukan, Macclesfield
Location: UK
Join Date: Dec 2000
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Ki Symbol Combat Effectiveness?

I found Aikido not in the same way as my fellow Aikidoka, e.g. other martial arts or recruited to the dojo, rather it was through the fascination engendered over three years ago in Diane Dreher's book "The Tao of Personal Leadership". As a result, a great deal of the discussion surrounding the discipline's effectiveness in combat has little relevance to my personal outlook toward training.

However, there was a time in which I felt it necessary to use the art. This saw me involved in one situation which we as professionals are told NEVER to interfere in the field of secondary education - on the playground in a fight. There were two pre-pubescent boys knocking seven bells out of one another. This, I felt - no, knew - instinctively, was going to stop. OK, not on the battlefields of Mongolia, but these were two spirits intent on meeting violence with violence.

Within seconds of arriving, something deep within me reached out with left and right hands and locked the wrists of these two, one of whom was substantially bigger than myself. No struggle ensued, no bruises further, and yes - no lawsuit. The melee dissolved into order. I still feel that this calm was a result of my short time in Aikido, especially as I had been entirely averse to any conflict prior to training.

I feel Aikido is effective in a "combat" situation, but more importantly life generally.

Calm thoughts.
EAK

Eric

Peace is giving.
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Old 12-07-2000, 10:06 PM   #48
LCaron
Dojo: Aikido of SB
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 1
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Ai symbol Aikido as a Combat technique...


Aikido in itself is, in my humble oppinion, not street-fighter training. The purpose of studying Aikido in a dojo is not to learn how to fight well, but to train the mind and body to react quickly and readily to any form of attack. Even though I have been taking Aikido for 13 years, I would not feel at all comfortable about my chances in a prolonged fight. What Aikido has given me is the ability to get the hell off of the line of attack so that I have a chance to withdraw from the situation. I have always been told that reatreat is the ultimate Aikido technique, and I firmly believe this.

Once the initial attack has been avoided, Aikidoists learn how to use their ki, or their entire body force together at one time, to take the opponent's ballance. I had the privilage of taking ukemi from a western region Shihan, and the instant I attacked I was completlely off-ballance. His utilization of his center of gravity was soo effective, I ultimately had 2 choices, to move around him to the best of my ability, or to get smacked in the face (though I'm sure he would not have hit me very hard the first time!). People like my own senseis have the seemingly magical ability to rob one of one's ballace from the first contact made in the technique.

Having said this, Aikido is practiced under the assumption that all attackes are filled with intention. Fainting and "faking out" an opponent is a very silly thing to do if you meet an experienced Aikidoist in a dark alley. As soon as the attack has been made, any highly experienced Aikidoka will seemingly dissapear and put you on the ground. Just be glad that the Aikidoka probably decided not to break something of yours!

An experienced Aikidoka is someone who understands their own body (i.e., someone above shodan), someone who can apply a great amount of force in a small period of time, and they are few and far between. Even though I have studied only Aikido for 13 years, I am only just beginning to understand what this wonderful art is all about.

Louis Caron

[Edited by LCaron on December 7, 2000 at 10:20pm]
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