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Old 06-23-2003, 07:47 PM   #26
Kevin Wilbanks
Location: Seattle/Southern Wisconsin
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The valsalva maneuver is something the body does reflexively in many circumstances to stabilize the spine. The exact physics of it are beyond my capacity to fully explain, but the increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) increases the stiffness of the lower torso. Try deadlifting something heavy and you should find that you do it automatically. In fact, the body seems to do it automatically during the hardest moments of virutally all heavy, major, multi-joint lifts. I supect that holding the breath at the moment of impact in hard falls is also somewhat automatic - as are a whole bunch of other intense, momentary muscle actions - and that doing so is possibly important for protecting the spine, but it's just a hunch.
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Old 06-24-2003, 10:27 AM   #27
Dave Miller
 
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The valsalva maneuver (point #8 on the linked page) is also a technique for equalising the pressure in the middle ear while diving, hence my confusion.

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Old 06-24-2003, 01:08 PM   #28
Kevin Wilbanks
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Hmm... according to that link, the diving technique isn't really the valsalva maneuver, though. I guess it's one of those things that gets repeated so many times that the 'incorrect' reference just becomes an alternate one.

Last edited by Kevin Wilbanks : 06-24-2003 at 01:12 PM.
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Old 06-24-2003, 01:46 PM   #29
Dave Miller
 
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I was suprised to learn that it had possibly been misattributed. Of course, it could be that the author of the article simply didn't do their homework correctly, also. At any rate, in the world of SCUBA and skin diving, it is still universally called the valsalva maneuver.

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Old 06-24-2003, 02:36 PM   #30
Kevin Wilbanks
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I guess if you think about it, they are both the same type of thing - just in one you are stopping the air at the throat and in the other at the nose. Also, if you tried to clear your ear pressure with anywhere near the force you use in a squat or deadlift, you'd probably end up deaf.
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Old 06-24-2003, 02:45 PM   #31
Dave Miller
 
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Quote:
Kevin Wilbanks wrote:
Also, if you tried to clear your ear pressure with anywhere near the force you use in a squat or deadlift, you'd probably end up deaf.
You got that right.

The first time I ever went diving, I waited too long to start clearing my ears and used too much pressure to do so. I had a headache for 2 or 3 days afterwards.

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