Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-12-2003, 01:49 AM   #1
batemanb
 
batemanb's Avatar
Dojo: Seibukan Aikido UK
Location: body in UK, heart still in Japan
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,029
Offline
What's the problem with Ki?

From another thread:

Quote:
Erik Haselhofer (Erik) wrote:
I think this thread illustrates, quite well in fact, why I find the word ki so distasteful.
I often wonder why people say things like this?

Many people over here in the west seem to have problems with the word "ki", in fact a 6th dan from Tomiki Aikido said to me at the weekend that he never used or mentioned the word in his classes.

Ki is a Japanese word that has many meanings, amongst them:

"heart", "spirit", "mood", "mind".

It's right there slap bang in the middle of Ai-ki-do, why is it such a problem for some that do the art?

I can hazard a guess to why some dislike it, but since we use it in its native form, I'm very interested to know what the issues are here?

Love, light, joy and laughter

Bryan

A difficult problem is easily solved by asking yourself the question, "Just how would the Lone Ranger handle this?"
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 03:03 AM   #2
Kelly Allen
Dojo: Friends Dojo
Location: Winnipeg
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 190
Offline
People hate or fear what they don't understand.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 04:22 AM   #3
PeterR
 
PeterR's Avatar
Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 3,021
Japan
Offline
Re: What's the problem with Ki?

Hi Brian;

So who was the 6th Dan? Names my boy I want names. And good for you for a bit of cross-training.

That said you don't here the term at Shodokan (Tomiki's own dojo) Honbu either. Last I checked it wasn't in the West. Not that we don't know what it is or (side glance at Kelly) because we fear it, but simply because it has taken on a loaded meaning which is far better described through physical terms. We have a whole series of powers (movement, focus, etc.) and then the more mystical Ki. I believe in many Ki society dojos that term is more encompassing.

I once had a visitor from these forums at Shodokan Honbu who was Ki Society - his comment was that the deshi (apprentice) showed some very powerful Ki. That deshi had he heard would have looked over, shrugged and continued to train. It is not something we particularily dwell on.

I think the same thing could be said of the majority of Aikido dojos in Japan. Yes Ki does mean alot of different things but ---

Ki is often part of a paired kanji.

Tenki - weather

Aiki - well what we do.

It is rare to hear it in isolation even if wood would come up in the conversation. It is actually quite strange to hear Ki is isolation.
Quote:
Bryan Bateman (batemanb) wrote:
From another thread:

I often wonder why people say things like this?

Many people over here in the west seem to have problems with the word "ki", in fact a 6th dan from Tomiki Aikido said to me at the weekend that he never used or mentioned the word in his classes.

Ki is a Japanese word that has many meanings, amongst them:

"heart", "spirit", "mood", "mind".

It's right there slap bang in the middle of Ai-ki-do, why is it such a problem for some that do the art?

I can hazard a guess to why some dislike it, but since we use it in its native form, I'm very interested to know what the issues are here?

Love, light, joy and laughter

Bryan

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 05:20 AM   #4
batemanb
 
batemanb's Avatar
Dojo: Seibukan Aikido UK
Location: body in UK, heart still in Japan
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,029
Offline
Re: Re: What's the problem with Ki?

Quote:
Peter Rehse (PeterR) wrote:
Hi Brian;

So who was the 6th Dan? Names my boy I want names. And good for you for a bit of cross-training.
Hi Peter,

I was actually doing a BAB coaching course taught by Bob Jones, a very nice chap, and a good tutor for an interesting course. At the end of play on Saturday, he did a 2 hour "workshop" for us non Tomiki chaps to help gain a better understanding of it, and to have a little play around with it. I thoroughly enjoyed that, despite coming very close to dislocationg fingers on both hands during a very mini competition, an enlightening experience .

Bryan

A difficult problem is easily solved by asking yourself the question, "Just how would the Lone Ranger handle this?"
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 05:26 AM   #5
Col.Clink
Dojo: Waiuku Ki Society
Location: New Zealand
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 68
Offline
Re: What's the problem with Ki?

Quote:
Bryan Bateman (batemanb) wrote:
I often wonder why people say things like this?

Many people over here in the west seem to have problems with the word "ki", in fact a 6th dan from Tomiki Aikido said to me at the weekend that he never used or mentioned the word in his classes.

Ki is a Japanese word that has many meanings, amongst them:

"heart", "spirit", "mood", "mind".

It's right there slap bang in the middle of Ai-ki-do, why is it such a problem for some that do the art?

I can hazard a guess to why some dislike it, but since we use it in its native form, I'm very interested to know what the issues are here?

Love, light, joy and laughter

Bryan
Hi Bryan,

issues are pretty simple as you can tell by Peter's response. The fact that I follow Ki Society, to some would make me a moron or new age freak, or another derogatory term. To others, they can understand or accept that I'm not really any different, I only have a different approach to training than they. It doesn't bother me what others think, weather they make informed judgements or not. All that matters is what I think, and how it effects me & my students.

If I taught mysticism, I don't think I'd have any students, maybe one or two at most. In fact, Peter made an excellent point...."but simply because it has taken on a loaded meaning which is far better described through physical terms". This is exactly how Ki testing is done, through the physical. Without that testing, I think Ki would be just that, a mystical term, and to some it still is, but each to their own.

When I meet someone else who studies Aikido, I think GREAT!! and can't wait to learn something new, I don't care which school they come from. We have all got something to share and a story to tell. I don't have a problem with Aikido or ki, I have a problem with ignorance, but maybe that's because I can't get passed my own ( hope not). Bashing from any side (unfortunately to some there are sides) does Aikido in general a dis-service, but the issues, I fear, run deeper than many of us will ever come to understand.



We can break down the characters of Aikido and come up with many interpretations, but it's still Aikido, perhaps that was the secret after all. We are all different, but all the same.

Regards

Rob


"Excess leads to the path of Wisdom"
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 08:46 AM   #6
opherdonchin
Dojo: Baltimore Aikido
Location: Baltimore
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 586
Offline
Quote:
Peter Rehse wrote:
Not that we don't know what it is or (side glance at Kelly) because we fear it, but simply because it has taken on a loaded meaning which is far better described through physical terms.
I find everything in your post interesting and thoughtful and thoughtprovoking except for this one sentence. Even this isn't too objectionable to me, but I thought maybe it would be easier to swallow if I softened it a bit. That is, maybe you mean,
Quote:
We think we know what it is, and that thing is something we don't fear. However, that something reduces to an explanation in physical terms that we find easier to understand and more comfortable.
Or maybe
Quote:
While some people my find other explanations of Ki more helpful, for me, the description in physical terms has been easiest to understand and most comfortable.
I hope you don't think I'm being snide or disrespectful. Maybe I just don't understand what you mean by "better described."

Yours in Aiki
Opher
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 09:04 AM   #7
jxa127
Dojo: Itten Dojo -- Mechanicsburg, PA
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 420
Offline
I don't think anything is wrong with ki. I strongly suggest that people read The Spirit of Aikido by Kisshomaru Ueshiba.

In that book, second doshu has a very rational and lucid discussion on ki and its various meanings. In the end, what I took from it is that ki can be thought of as focus or intention; a way of uniting the mind and the body.

A great analogy would be the way a baseball player continues his swing even after hitting the ball. His intention is to swing through the ball. In terms of physics, the portion of his swing after the ball has connected does absolutely nothing to affect the ball. But, if the batter only swings until he hits the ball and then stops, his mind will have slowed the bat part way through the swing. The follow through is like ki -- it units the batter's mind and body so that the bat is swung powerfully as it hits the ball.

Similarly, when I was shooting competitively, I always held my sight picture until well after the bullet had left he barrel. Had I been thinking of checking the spotting scope immediately after pulling the trigger, my mind would get ahead of the gun and I'd start to move while the bullet was still in the barrel. Again, the follow through was like ki in that it kept me focused long enough for me not to mess up the shot.

These are physical phenomena that are affected by mental intention. Just like ki.

So in aikido, I seldom think just in terms of ki, but it helps as a mental model for ensuring proper body position, structure, and movement.

Regards,

-Drew

----
-Drew Ames
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 09:29 AM   #8
Charles Hill
Dojo: Numazu Aikikai/Aikikai Honbu Dojo
Location: Three Lakes WI/ Mishima Japan
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 837
Offline
I have to disagree with Peter on the usage of "ki" in the Japanese language. The language is full of expressions using "ki" even in isolation. One of the most common phrases is "ki wo tsukete" literally meaning "put on your ki," really meaning "be careful."

I think what everyone is discussing is a specialized usage of the word that, in my opinion, is not originally Japanese. In Japan, ki has a very general meaning, something that is hard to put into words. I think what we are talking about has much more of a Chinese influence. "Ki" in Japanese and "Chi" in Chinese have meanings which, while having some overlap, are fundamentally different.

In Chinese thinking, there is no confusion about chi. It refers to very specific energies that have different types and are clearly labelled. The confusion, as I see it, came about through Japanese martial arts teachers who were influenced by the Chinese thinking. The two ideas get mixed. For westerners, understanding what is going on when hearing the word,"ki" becomes very difficult.

What I have done, is to read as much as I can about the subject in the two cultures. However, I still have a long way to go as it is still confusing.

Charles
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 09:32 AM   #9
akiy
 
akiy's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 5,835
Offline
Quote:
Charles Hill wrote:
I have to disagree with Peter on the usage of "ki" in the Japanese language. The language is full of expressions using "ki" even in isolation. One of the most common phrases is "ki wo tsukete" literally meaning "put on your ki," really meaning "be careful."
I've written an article on just this sort of thing:

http://www.aikiweb.com/language/ki_phrases.html

-- Jun

Please help support AikiWeb -- become an AikiWeb Contributing Member!
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 09:47 AM   #10
kironin
 
kironin's Avatar
Dojo: Houston Ki Aikido
Location: Houston,TX
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 1,032
United_States
Offline
Ki Symbol Re: Re: What's the problem with Ki?

Quote:
Robert H.G Burrell (Col.Clink) wrote:
If I taught mysticism, I don't think I'd have any students, maybe one or two at most. In fact, Peter made an excellent point...."but simply because it has taken on a loaded meaning which is far better described through physical terms". This is exactly how Ki testing is done, through the physical. Without that testing, I think Ki would be just that, a mystical term, and to some it still is, but each to their own.

When I meet someone else who studies Aikido, I think GREAT!! and can't wait to learn something new,...

Beautifully put Robert, I wholly agree.

Ki is taught through the physical not the verbal.

I leave the lectures on Ki to the senior teachers in Japan who seem to be totally comfortable talking about Ki (contrary to what Peter states).

Craig
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 10:24 AM   #11
opherdonchin
Dojo: Baltimore Aikido
Location: Baltimore
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 586
Offline
Quote:
The confusion, as I see it, came about through Japanese martial arts teachers who were influenced by the Chinese thinking. The two ideas get mixed.
Well, now there is one of those rare and amazing times when someone says something on these forusm that really changes the way I think and opens up a whole new perspective on a topic I thought was familiar.

Thanks, Charles

Yours in Aiki
Opher
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 11:25 AM   #12
Erik
Location: Bay Area
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 1,200
Offline
Bryan, Peter more or less nailed it. The term messes with people's heads in a really bad way.

I've got a TKD guy in my town who supposedly heals cancer in horses with his ki powers. I wonder where he got the idea? What about beams of light from someone's forehead? I heard that one from a shihan. What about no-touch pins and throws from 10 feet away? In the early 90's I could have shown you a fellow doing that all day long with his powerful ki. I could go on, and on, and on, and on....

When you use the word ki, and you aren't extremely careful, you can wind up with people thinking all kinds of BS.

Last edited by Erik : 06-12-2003 at 11:28 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 11:55 AM   #13
kironin
 
kironin's Avatar
Dojo: Houston Ki Aikido
Location: Houston,TX
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 1,032
United_States
Offline
Confused

Quote:
Erik Haselhofer (Erik) wrote:
Bryan, Peter more or less nailed it. The term messes with people's heads in a really bad way.
Nonsense.

It only messes with people's heads who want to be messed with. If someone wants to view the

world through a supernatural lens, then they are going to find a way to. Be it through chi, crystals, chakras, kotodama, angels, wood sprites, virgins, ghosts, ether, psychics, meditation, etc.

Banning a word isn't going to change that.

Craig
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 12:02 PM   #14
mike lee
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 646
Offline
heaped nonsense

Ban the word in Amerika and leave the rest of us alone. Might as well change the name of your new art to aido .
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 03:56 PM   #15
Don_Modesto
Dojo: Messores Sensei (Largo, Fl.)
Location: Florida
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 1,267
Offline
Re: heaped nonsense

Quote:
Mike Lee (mike lee) wrote:
Ban the word in Amerika and leave the rest of us alone. Might as well change the name of your new art to aido .
That's how it's usually translated anyway-The Way of Harmony.

I'm good with that.

Take the "KI" out of Aikido (but don't take the "harm" out of harmony...)

Don J. Modesto
St. Petersburg, Florida
------------------------
http://www.theaikidodojo.com/
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 07:23 PM   #16
PeterR
 
PeterR's Avatar
Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 3,021
Japan
Offline
What's the problem with Ki?

Quote:
Craig Hocker (kironin) wrote:
totally comfortable talking about Ki (contrary to what Peter states).
Where did I say senior Japanese teachers are uncomforatble talking about Ki.

What I did say is that it is not something most Aikido dojos in Japan particularily dwell on especially during training.

I was sitting on grounds of a temple north of Kyoto with an old Chinese man who remarked how he always fills filled with Chi from the old trees. I felt pretty good too, whose going to argue about what caused it.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 09:01 PM   #17
Don_Modesto
Dojo: Messores Sensei (Largo, Fl.)
Location: Florida
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 1,267
Offline
Re: What's the problem with Ki?

Quote:
Peter Rehse (PeterR) wrote:
I was sitting on grounds of a temple north of Kyoto with an old Chinese man who remarked how he always fills filled with Chi from the old trees. I felt pretty good too, whose going to argue about what caused it.
Try it for a hangover and get back to us.

(g)

Don J. Modesto
St. Petersburg, Florida
------------------------
http://www.theaikidodojo.com/
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 09:07 PM   #18
PeterR
 
PeterR's Avatar
Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 3,021
Japan
Offline
Re: Re: What's the problem with Ki?

Quote:
Don J. Modesto (Don_Modesto) wrote:
Try it for a hangover and get back to us.
I wish I could remember the temples name and also that of the old man. He was from Hong Kong on a pilgrimage/tourist thingy. My ankle was swollen to the size of a grapefruit due to a randori mishap and with our respective infirmities we were made for each other. This particular temple had an outside hotspring not to mention some really big trees - both of which work wonders for hangovers and grapefruits.

I wasn't hungover that day - but I usually escape to the woods when I am.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 09:30 PM   #19
Charles Hill
Dojo: Numazu Aikikai/Aikikai Honbu Dojo
Location: Three Lakes WI/ Mishima Japan
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 837
Offline
If Peter won't say it, I will. I think it would be extremely unusual for a Japanese Aikido teacher in Japan to talk about ki in the dojo. (Outside of Ki no kenkyu kai dojo of course.)

Charles
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2003, 11:03 PM   #20
DaveO
Dojo: Great Wave Aikido
Location: Alberta, Canada
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 543
Canada
Offline
I know nothing about it; but it seems to me the 'problem with ki' is not in ki itself; rather from the semi-mystical nonsense prevalent in the world today. I hope I make sense at this to make my point:

I'm a serious pragmatist when it comes to self defence; when I started Aikido I was extremely skeptical about ki and its application. Now I have no reservations; perhaps my association with the Ki Society causes me to think in ki terms more often than other styles; I don't know - I haven't taken any other styles. But in this post; I'm thinking about folks at the other end of the spectrum: those I call the Granola of society; the fruits, nuts and flakes. There's a lot of 'em; and they think some very weird things - one only has to look at everyone's favorite MA video - Yellow Bamboo - to see that. As the recruiter for our dojo; I've gotten some very weird E-mails from interested parties. Many seem to get their concept of ki from Dragon Ball Z and other realms; I remember one in particular my Sensei showed me in which the person stated "i beleeve i have the most powerful ki of anyone in the last hundrd yeers. i want to learn how to throw ki balls at peeple." Sheesh - but I'm getting off-topic. The problem with ki as I see it is that people are either too willing to believe in ki as Luke Skywalker's Force; or so determined not to believe same they reject it out of hand.

As a VERY junior instructor at the dojo; I try to show ki as a viewpoint; a way of moving and thinking about moving rather than a separate force in its own right. I could be wrong about this; but for the moment, it seems to work for me.

Thanx all

Answers are only easy when they're incomplete.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2003, 01:55 AM   #21
mike lee
Location: Taipei, Taiwan
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 646
Offline
blah, blah, blah

Quote:
I think it would be extremely unusual for a Japanese Aikido teacher in Japan to talk about ki in the dojo.
It would be extremely unusual for a Chinese martial-arts master not to talk about chi in the dojo as well as outside the dojo.

Chi is everywhere and it's very real. In fact, everything is chi light, heat, and even matter. (Ever hear of a nuclear explosion?)

But the chi that we commonly talk about and utilize in martial arts, sports, and the healing arts is the life force.

As we age, sustaining the life force becomes more and more vital.

Getting the flu shows one what it's like to have one's chi drained. Recovering from an injury is a good challenge in learning how to circulate and stimulate one's own chi.

Last edited by mike lee : 06-14-2003 at 01:57 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2003, 08:56 AM   #22
antdigoh
Location: Phils.
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 15
Offline
Ki is a very subtle and complex matter to discuss. If you want to experience what really ki is --- just do Tekubi Furi Undo exercise or shaking exercise. After doing the said exercise you'll notice that there is a current flowing through your arms down to your finger tips --- that is KI.

When we talk about ki development one must be familiar with the so called chakra or energy center. Chakra is a Hindu word meaning 'nerve center' or 'wheel'. These chakras or energy center controls the vital organs of our body. First we simply define ki as energy (whew!. let's compromise for a while of how we should define ki). I guess everybody understands the word energy.

There are seven major chakras or energy center namely: Crown chakra- controls the brain,pineal gland, browse (ajna)chakra- controls the pituitary glands(this is the so called master chakra), throat chakra- controls the thyroid gland, heart chakra- of course controls the heart, solar plexus chakra- the stomach, the liver, pancreas and the intestines , sex chakra- of course the reproductive organs & this is where our center(one point) is located and the root chakra- at the base of the spine.

The spine is the central channel that runs thru the body, along this channel are seven energy centers or the so called chakras.

If we are talking of KI development, our chakra or energy centers must be aligned first in order for the energy to flow smoothly through this chakra. And we should desist from focusing on our center or one point because it's a very dangerous practice and would even result to death. Being a practitioner of yoga I learned that the higher chakra should be developed first rather than the lower chakra. Because the entry of energy or universal ki is from the top of the head or the crown chakra and it will flows down to the other chakra up to the end of the spine.

The reason behind this is the so called 'Kundalini' located the base of the spine which means "coiled serpent". It is like a power cable, causing it to rise up through the chakras is said to release great powers when it reaches the crown chakra. Our center or one point is parallel to this chakra, when we focus or keep one point we also activates the root chakra. And we are advised not to activate this chakra without the guidance of someone highly trained in the art of kundalini.

The higher energy should be transmuted down to the lower energy center before we trigger the lower energy to rise up. Because the lower energy is coarse in nature and the higher energy are very subtle and refined energy. When the energy flows from one center to another it changes form and some sort of bio-chemical reaction is happening which affects our internal organ being control by these energy centers.

I hope that you do understand my point from esoteric view. I am also an Aikidoka who's been doing some research on Ki Development...nice to butt in

anton
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2003, 08:56 PM   #23
asiawide
Location: Seoul
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 119
Offline
There are many YOGIs in india. Since they have very strong KI, they can master aikido in a week! Yeah!

Jaemin
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2003, 10:37 PM   #24
PhilJ
 
PhilJ's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Bukou
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 240
Offline
I'll expand on Mike's interpretation a bit based on my own experience.

Folks have said that when you train the body past the point of exhaustion, you get to that "inner stone" and begin polishing it. I find this to be agreeable by my own happenings in and outside the dojo.

Take, for instance, illness, as Mike mentioned. I have been hit now with two bouts of @##@%! food poisoning in 6 months. Aside from the obvious now-abstinence of 3rd party meals , my ki had been eaten away.

But sometimes this is when my aikido training makes the best leaps in (hopefully) understanding my aikido. I don't have the energy to stand, much less crawl, and so I'm left to my feverish thoughts.

Now I'm not saying I'm right by any means, nor am I saying that getting ill has made me a better aikidoist. Still, what I'm "learning" while sick holds a deeper understanding than I've ever had before the illness. "A new way of looking at it", you could say.

So in this respect, I find ki not be explainable, but something I learned from by not having it. When my ki (and body/mind) are replenished, I'll put the "new angle" to the test and see if it cuts the mustard.

I should add that after my first bout of food poisoning, which nearly did kill me literally, my chief instructor (MikeE) would probably tell you he saw signifcant improvement in how I execute technique. Lucky, coincidence? Maybe. I like to think of this being one of my sick little ways of polishing the stone.

*Phil

Last edited by PhilJ : 06-15-2003 at 10:39 PM.

Phillip Johnson
Enso Aikido Dojo, Burnsville, MN
An Aikido Bukou Dojo
http://www.aikidobukou.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2003, 08:33 AM   #25
TomanGaidin
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 41
Offline
My own understanding of 'ki' is just 'energy'. Energy of mind, energy of body, or the energy of spirit - not in a mystical sense, but in the sense of.. someone being spirited ;p. If that's unified into good intention - whether it be delivering an attack with strong intent, or executing a technique in a flowing, strong and intentional manner - then I'd call it ki. That's just my view of it. Everyone perceives things differently .
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Poll: If you could be uke for yourself, would you be able to throw yourself? AikiWeb System AikiWeb System 72 08-07-2013 05:16 PM
Aikido and being Christian Nick Spiritual 178 07-31-2010 06:47 PM
Stanislavsky and Ki DaveO General 11 01-20-2006 10:11 AM
Ki is Extended. tedehara Spiritual 5 11-15-2004 10:12 PM
Train In Ki And Why chadsieger Training 54 06-15-2002 10:26 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:02 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate