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Old 03-01-2003, 11:45 PM   #1
KaitlinCostello
 
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Aikido as a journey

I have spent most of this weekend looking within, question why I do what I do. So here is my question for those who wish to answer. Has Aikido been a personal journey for you? Have you found your philosophies have changed? Has a aikido changed who you are, or were? I respect the need for privacy and invite those who are comfortable to share their experience and stories regarding the topic at hand. I am sharing my journey as I feel that I have something to offer, whether it be inspiration, the formation of questions, or to allow one to look deeper within him or her self.

Again, I understand if this far too personal to post upon.


For those who are interested in my journey:

I'm one of those quiet people-- withdrawn, looking in from the outside. . I did a lot of stupid things that irreversibly changed me life and way I regarded the world. I had lost faith in people and in my self. I often reacted violently to physical contact from people who tried to enter tiny sphere of a world. My world was one that was dominated by fear, insecurity and pain. I was paralyzed.. I forget, in a sense, how to live and began to wither away.

My cycle of anger, fear and violence threatened to tear me apart.

After literally having a nervous and mental break down, I realized that I needed to find balance in my life. I took a chance , joining a class I had not a clue about. My first day of aikido I had my bus ticket in hand, and was ready to run once again from the problems and conflicts in my life. The environment I was greeted in was friendly and gave me hope that I wasn't such a colossal screw up as I had been taught from early on. Soon enough that bus ticket was torn up and thrown away.

Slowly I came around.

Now two months in, while the change isn't exactly visible from the outside, I am indeed a different person. I have found value in my self and my trust for the world is coming back. In my darkest moments, I felt as through I was dying so very slowly, withering away unwanted and useless. Now... well I am more alive then I can ever remember. I can laugh again, and smile through my tears of frustration. I can tolerate physical contact, and no longer feel the urge to run away.

I think above all, Aikido has become a life art for me .It exposes where I am vulnerable and resonates when I am strongest. Aikido has brought me back to that brink, where I had to decide between life and death, and has given my the gentle hand in which to give life back.

I compare my journey to that of the fledgling Bonsai Tree . Ragged, torn, and seemingly dead. Given time and careful care , broken branches and scarred roots heal. What once looked to be a heap of dried out branchs now becomes a living , beautiful thing. As time goes by the fledgling Bonsai changes and grows. Who knows where it will go, or how is will change in the coming years? All we know is that with tender care, and patience that those weak roots and broken branches will be strong and beautiful.

Last edited by KaitlinCostello : 03-01-2003 at 11:52 PM.

~~No smile is as beautiful as the one that struggles through tears.~~
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Old 03-02-2003, 02:16 AM   #2
Jeff Tibbetts
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First of all, I want to thank you for the open and honest post. I think that it's vitally important for us to all look at other people's stories and try to empathize with them. After reading your post, I felt that on some level I should be grateful for not having to work through so much to train, and I'm just a bit jealous. This may surprise you, but it's something that's kindof been building up in my mind as of late. I was thinking the other day after an argument with my brother-in-law, and I came to the conclusion that most of the most rewarding and treasured memories and moments in my life are the ones that I had to struggle the hardest to get. This may not seem like something that has a whole lot to do with Aikido, but it is. I was always the type of person who had to rationalize everything. I couldn't be motivated to do something without having some good reasons. That meant that I sat around playing games and whatnot all the time, and tried to take the easy way out of everything. I think that Aikido taught me a few things about trying harder. It would be easy to quit, I can think of a lot of reasons not to train -wether it's my 6 days a week at work or 5 classes in college- but I go anyway. Making that commitment was a major turnaround for me. Here was something that I would try first before I decided it was too much work or time. Well, suffice to say that I'm still going with no end in sight, and this attitude has invaded the rest of my life as well. So less sitting around and more DOING things, even difficult things. I don't know where it's all going in the end, but I'm commited to finding out what happens along the way. To relate it back to you, I think that in some ways the fact that you had to climb such a barrier to train makes the training that much sweeter or more meeningful. There are lots of people who train, but maybe it's a deeper meaning for some. More likely, it takes some time for most of us to see the true value of overcoming difficulty, but you did that part first... I think that your signature says all that in one line, and we should all think about that truth for just a moment before we go on with our lives.

If the Nightingale doesn't sing-
wait
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Old 03-02-2003, 03:53 AM   #3
jducusin
 
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First off, I also wish to thank you, Kaitlin, for having the courage to share your personal experience with us. I know full well that there is always a certain amount of vulnerability involved in opening up (especially to strangers) but that the potential rewards of when others sincerely respond to this in kind are often well worth the risk.

Like Jeff, I too am a firm believer that nothing worth having in life is ever attained easily. As such, I have always strived to constantly push myself and test my limits. In the process, I'd like to think that I have somehow gained a stronger sense of self-knowledge and self-ownership.

I had often believed myself to be a person for whom learning new things seemed to just always come naturally, and that to expect any less of myself was simply unacceptable. In retrospect, I have found that the short time in which I have studied Aikido thus far has already given me greater patience with myself than I had once thought possible. I've learned to go easier on myself if I'm not quite catching onto something new right away, to accept that I will learn at my own pace, concern myself less with the pace of others (I was raised by extremely competitive parents) and simply to enjoy the journey.

All the best to you on that journey of your own.
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Old 03-02-2003, 10:16 AM   #4
Kung Fu Liane
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Confused

I think that you will get a lot out of aikido if you treat it as a way of life and not just another physical exercise (though physical exercise part of it is very worthwhile). The people i see who train in martial arts just to be an effective fighter or to get fit, don't seem to appreciate martial arts on the deeper levels, not initially anyway. But those who treat their martial art as a way of life seem to develop a certain calmness that the others don't have. That calmness is what you take out of the dojo, and its what you can use throughout the rest of your life. very valuable.

for me it was tai chi, i met a teacher who was prepared to spend a lot of time focussing on my development, who forced me to change, kicking and screaming for the early stages. its pretty cool to meet someone like that, but i eventually began to see him as a god-like figure, and now i'm having to deal with the fact that he isn't. That is what Aikido taught me.

my advice is be a bonsai tree for now if it helps, but think about growing beyond that, after all bonsai trees are restricted - they are clipped and pruned, their growth is stunted in a way.

its the journey that is the most fun, not the end result, so enjoy yourself

Aikido: a martial art which allows you to defeat your enemy without hurting him, unless of course he doesn't know how to breakfall in which case he will shatter every bone in his body when he lands. Also known as Origami with people
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Old 03-02-2003, 11:20 AM   #5
jducusin
 
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Quote:
Liane Guillou (Kung Fu Liane) wrote:
I think that you will get a lot out of aikido if you treat it as a way of life and not just another physical exercise (though physical exercise part of it is very worthwhile). The people i see who train in martial arts just to be an effective fighter or to get fit, don't seem to appreciate martial arts on the deeper levels, not initially anyway.
I definitely agree with Liane on this point. I believe that what you get out of something is proportional to what you put into it. So if you view something as merely a tool or a means to an end, to a certain degree you cut yourself off; you become less and less self-aware and less open towards a full understanding of all the other potential ways in which that thing might have an effect on you. (Just as an aside: On an interpersonal level--- sadly, I see this more and more each day in how many people relate to one another.)

In the long run, however (as Liane implied), I do think that Aikido can have the ability to teach someone (even someone who only cares for and believes in its physical aspects) something that they did not expect to learn about themselves at all---including catching a glimpse of those deeper, more spiritual levels---whether they like it or not.
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Old 03-02-2003, 01:10 PM   #6
KaitlinCostello
 
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First of all, I would like to thank those who have, so far, posted. I will try to keep up with the postings as much as I can, even though things are slightly hectic right now

Jeff,

Experiences and the act of sharing them are what gives our lives momentum. I am humbled , if not turned into a blushing mess by the reaction to this thread so far. I had thought, initially that this could be a slightly controversial thread, however all the replies have soothed that concern. It would seem I've opened the proverbially can of worms. Not that that is a bad thing
Quote:
After reading your post, I felt that on some level I should be grateful for not having to work through so much to train, and I'm just a bit jealous. This may surprise you, but it's something that's kind of been building up in my mind as of late. I was thinking the other day after an argument with my brother-in-law, and I came to the conclusion that most of the most rewarding and treasured memories and moments in my life are the ones that I had to struggle the hardest to get. This may not seem like something that has a whole lot to do with Aikido, but it is.
IMHO no matter how we try to clear our ego, the currents of everything going on in our lives still remains. We bring these things to the mat, and often times we brings things from the mat, home once more. This may be a surprise to you, but when working I am not constanly assaulted by fears and the problems that generally arise during training. It is only at the moment when I stand at the balancing point. I am pushed to the edge of my comfort zone, looking back I can either run and hide, or I can step off the ledge and fall and take a chance. In aikido, this is the point when you are conflicted, where you must step in and blend into the technique, or freeze, which I often do, still.

At this point I'd like to share a quote I pulled from a French film I saw sometime ago (when I could still speak the languge de amore!)
Quote:
Its about society falling..

So far .. so good...

So far .. so good...

So far.. so good...

But its not how you fall...

Its how you land
We live in a society and more over cultures which push us to the breaking point from time to time. Concerns, anger, emotions and all the things that make our experience tangible and dynamic can work against us. Aikido is a calming effect on the rolling tides.. Imho atleast. I find that the most trying moments, are not always the darkest. An example: I believe at the time, we were learning Katate-dori Irimi-nage. This was a HUGE issue for me. There was no "personal" space between Nage and I , added to the fact that Nage was touching the side of my face and neck as he or she set me up for the back fall. It took fifteen attempts and three partners before I was able to go through the exercise without jumping away or attempting to strike out. That is a memory that stands out for me. I was able to tolerate and slowly become comfortable with some one I have known for a relatively short time, to get so close to me. After that class I cried for half an hour, not because I was scared, but I was happy. For the first time in a long time, such close contact had not brought me pain, or physical violence.
Quote:
So less sitting around and more DOING things, even difficult things. I don't know where it's all going in the end, but I'm commited to finding out what happens along the way. To relate it back to you, I think that in some ways the fact that you had to climb such a barrier to train makes the training that much sweeter or more meeningful. There are lots of people who train, but maybe it's a deeper meaning for some.
My grandfather always told me, to live in the now. There is no yesterday, but only tomorrow. I think my journey is interlinked with those who have been a part of it. My Sensei, my training partners and of my better half. Between the lost puppy look to sensei, and literally trying to run away from half my partners, I learned a lot about tolerance. If these had not been so supportive and patient, who knows what would have happened. I know some of the people who have been my training partners will not return for another term. This saddens me, but we all have to follow our own paths. The memories and lessons learned will not leave with them. They are in some way indelibly printed on our spirits
Quote:
More likely, it takes some time for most of us to see the true value of overcoming difficulty, but you did that part first... I think that your signature says all that in one line, and we should all think about that truth for just a moment before we go on with our lives.
My journey is different then others. I would like to think that those who stood by me during the toughest moments , became richer as people and as aikidoka. Aikido is about blending with the forces that threaten to steal out balance and energy. I believe what some of my partners have learned is that, while we rationalize those forces to be coming from without, they can often times come from within.

Again , thank you for your response and honesty.

~~No smile is as beautiful as the one that struggles through tears.~~
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Old 03-02-2003, 01:27 PM   #7
KaitlinCostello
 
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Jamie,

There is no thanks needed. I am humbled by the response so far and feel that in working in a vulnerable area as such, I become stronger. Indeed the risk is well work it. Even if the only consequence of my words was to get people to review exactly what aikido has taken from them, and in turn given back.
Quote:
Like Jeff, I too am a firm believer that nothing worth having in life is ever attained easily. As such, I have always strived to constantly push myself and test my limits. In the process, I'd like to think that I have somehow gained a stronger sense of self-knowledge and self-ownership.
In a sense, through pushing our selves, we learn what our "preconceived" limits are, and in turn realize that we can reach so much farther. In pushing my away my "stay away from , stay away from me!" attitude I realized just how much I had to learn from contact. I also grew out of the mind set that I was nothing but a weak victim. Such is a freedom from our minds, in a sense. Though this differs greatly from person to person.
Quote:
In retrospect, I have found that the short time in which I have studied Aikido thus far has already given me greater patience with myself than I had once thought possible. I've learned to go easier on myself if I'm not quite catching onto something new right away, to accept that I will learn at my own pace, concern myself less with the pace of others (I was raised by extremely competitive parents) and simply to enjoy the journey
Hmmm.. Patience becomes such a trying virtue doesn't it? We have to slow down from our everyday lives, which for some can be chaotically frantic. I have actually found that I've gained a great distaste for competitive arts, specifically competitive martial arts. Now I would like to say that my opinion is but an opinion with no disrespect to those who practice the latter. Personally , through my short study of aikido I have found that , in my opinion, if we used an art that is so personal and de "ego-fying" to promote a competitive spirit, we take ten steps back on what we learned and compromise our integrity and balance. Just my two cents on that .

Best regards and once more many thanks for replying!

~~No smile is as beautiful as the one that struggles through tears.~~
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Old 03-02-2003, 01:38 PM   #8
KaitlinCostello
 
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Liane,
Quote:
I think that you will get a lot out of aikido if you treat it as a way of life and not just another physical exercise (though physical exercise part of it is very worthwhile). The people i see who train in martial arts just to be an effective fighter or to get fit, don't seem to appreciate martial arts on the deeper levels, not initially anyway. But those who treat their martial art as a way of life seem to develop a certain calmness that the others don't have. That calmness is what you take out of the dojo, and its what you can use throughout the rest of your life. very valuable.
I cannot agree more. It is unfortunate that some martial arts are purely physical in emphasis, neglecting the vast capability for deeper exploration of the mind and spirit. I sat and watched a few classes going on in a Dojo in Denver last year, Karate and Judo, I believe. What struck me, as I was walking home, was the incredible amount of tension that I saw. I came to aikido wondering, nay skeptical to see the difference, but was pleasantly surprised. The calmness, transcends from practice to life. No amount of conditioning or focus can be so valuable as that.
Quote:
my advice is be a bonsai tree for now if it helps, but think about growing beyond that, after all bonsai trees are restricted - they are clipped and pruned, their growth is stunted in a way.
Given time all things change. For now my journey is slow and so far, sweet. Again, thank you for your time and your response.

I wish you the best on your journey.

~~No smile is as beautiful as the one that struggles through tears.~~
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Old 03-02-2003, 01:56 PM   #9
KaitlinCostello
 
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And to Jamie Again
Quote:
So if you view something as merely a tool or a means to an end, to a certain degree you cut yourself off; you become less and less self-aware and less open towards a full understanding of all the other potential ways in which that thing might have an effect on you. (Just as an aside: On an interpersonal level--- sadly, I see this more and more each day in how many people relate to one another.)
Okay, I'm going to open another can of worms. In my study of aikido I have also dabbled in the debates (endless as they are) about Ki , or any other energy we use to visual, complete or assist our technique.

The way I kinda view this, though please keep in mind this is my limited opinion, is that Ki, energy whatever you want to call it, is a large part of the application of aikido. Mentally we have to open out minds to the physical possibilities that each technique and action can have. I took this a step further, testing a theory about two weeks ago. I am open an aware of my self and who is around me (to a certain point-- my sight is not that great these days). In this instance, I believe we were on the umpteenth round of Shomen-uchi Dai-Ikkyo. Instead of playing the race to pin, I quit trying to focus my eyes (everything is really blurry if I don't,) and allowed my posture to relax. As I closed my eyes and I felt my partner move, It was akin to have a soft breeze come against me. Instead of jumping forward to meet a "center" point , which I often did, I relaxed even more and slide forward. Bam. We made contact, the "breeze" feeling curled around me, I pivoted, and pinned. That was my little experience with Ki, or mayhaps just a breeze from the main door but still it was unique. Not something I could have achieved if I have been focusing on getting the physical aspects perfected. Sorry if I drifted off topic.. Merely an interesting experience.
Quote:
In the long run, however (as Liane implied), I do think that Aikido can have the ability to teach someone (even someone who only cares for and believes in its physical aspects) something that they did not expect to learn about themselves at all---including catching a glimpse of those deeper, more spiritual levels---whether they like it or not.
Aikido reveals your weakness, physically and in the way you think. Its quite humbling. I've been forced to gentle me self down ( yet I still get chided for being too gentle… ah the paradox!). The benefits of learning over long term are priceless.

Thank you again for replying!

~~No smile is as beautiful as the one that struggles through tears.~~
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Old 03-02-2003, 09:26 PM   #10
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This is almost spooky.I just spent a long time trying to articulate what is going on with me, aikido, resistance, painful evolution...hit a wrong key and lost it.

Then i started it over, a little differently as what i had written brought up other stuff and a friend sent me an email with a link to a falun gong site and when i hit the link the page opened up in the same browser i was writing on and when i hit the "back" key my second posting was gone as well.

I guess i'm not supposed to be talking about it now so thanks Kaitlin for saying it for me.

Q

Q
http://www.aikidopetaluma.com/
www.knot-working.com

"It is not wise to be incautious when confronting a little smiling bald man"'- Rule #1
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Old 03-03-2003, 07:07 AM   #11
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This thread is getting entirely too deep and serious so suffice it to say that I have always wanted to be able to break faces like Steven Seagal and Aikido is a fun way to do just that.

But seriously, there is a lot of stuff going on just below the surface which I am unable to articulate in a way which wont come off sounding totally sappy.

I used to be the kind of person who goes to bed at night, wakes up next morning, goes to work, comes home and stretches out infront of the tv for 3 hours, goes to bed... etc, repeat until dead.

After discovering Aikido, everything that I thought was important has had its volume turned down and the realy important things in life have not only become apparent to me but also available.
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Old 03-03-2003, 09:48 AM   #12
Joseph Huebner
 
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Kaitlin, Thanks for your story! Aikido as a journey started years before I began studying this year. In retrospect, I see the desire beginning back in 1997 while I was in a hospital bed fighting against lymphoma. I am new, having started last month in the study of Aikido.

Like you, I have many challenges I face, and have faced. I live by the belief that it is not the challenge you face which identifies who you are; it is how you overcome them. I was not given much of a chance at surviving my illness past a few weeks of being diagnosed. This is dramatic, yet I make it a point to let others know that it is possible to live beyond what the doctors said. All of us are touched by life threatening illnesses.

I've gained something from your story, and the thoughts and comments of others who have posted.

We all have our fair share of experiences, good and bad, yet we all are on the same broad path. Thanks for opening your life to us.

Joseph

www.jhuebner.net

If you think you can, you will. If you think you won't, you're right.
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Old 03-03-2003, 02:50 PM   #13
SeiserL
 
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It has been a journey to get here and will always continue to be a journey. There really is no destination.

Until again,

Lynn

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 03-04-2003, 04:34 AM   #14
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It is a journey, and just like trekking in the mountains, the most memorable stretches of path are the ones that were difficult to walk, and those that lies ahead of you are the most beautiful.

Like many of the others I just want to thank you for your story. I sincerely wish the best for you. Remeber to nurse that bonsai, and don't loose faith if it drops it's leaves at autumn. They'll grow back in spring. From time to time we all experience days, weeks or maybe months of little or no progress - perhaps even a feeling of degressing, but with a little faith and a lot of determination, they will lead you to a new and even higher mountain top, and probably prove to be beautiful and challenging paths once you get past them. Enjoy practice and remember to receive the knowledge and attention you can get and give what ever energy and effort you have to give.

Best of luck!

- Jørgen Jakob Friis

Inspiration - Aspiration - Perspiration
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Old 05-01-2004, 12:48 PM   #15
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Re: Aikido as a journey

Kaitlin, I have spent the greater part of my life in anger and turmoil. I began aikido with the same intent as I began karate do, If I may quote a previous instructor "learn to do unto others before they do it to you, and make sure they don't get back up".
However, after a short period of time and research I began to see another aspect to this art; a spiritual side that I had not seen in any other style of martial arts. I had been a devote atheist prior to my beginning aikido. I believe that aikido has been my path to spiritual enlightenment, inner peace, and most importantly my belief and faith in God. I have embraced the study of Christianity,Buddhism, and Taoism all of which has strengthened my acceptance of the self,and my view of life and the world in which we live. Yes aikido can merely be another martial art, or if the aikidoka is searching a whole new world will be made available. God bless I pray that you will continue as I have and find the peace you desire. Tao people flow with nature without seeking to control it; Living not to control or posses, but to be in harmony with life. (As I understand it: Tori flows with uke not trying to posses or control but in harmony with uke).
B(Phil 4:13)
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Old 05-02-2004, 06:44 PM   #16
Dario Rosati
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Re: Aikido as a journey

Quote:
KaitlinCostello wrote:
Has Aikido been a personal journey for you? Have you found your philosophies have changed? Has a aikido changed who you are, or were?
Hi Kaitlin,

Here's the journey of a newbie.
After 10 months of Aikido, I've rediscovered my body, and that was my initial target... this means, to me, that Aikido works.
This fact alone has made me truly a reborn man.

I'm 32 and I've awaited too long to join the MA path, due to the fact that when I was 19, I tried Judo and Karate but was disappointed by some side-aspects... the arts were cool but many practitioners made me feel uneasy (most of them wanna do MA to look cool in brawling situations).
Unfortunately, Aikido was absolutely unavailable/hidden here by the time, so I became a volleyball pro and forgot the MA things for 13 years... until now: no more volleyball for age constraints, and a sedentary job... hey, time to try again with a MA

I choosed Aikido out of videos, some Seagal unavoidable marketing effects, because it's hard to master compared to other MAs and this is definately a guarantee of quality, because atemi have didactical meanings, because it has no kumite, because you may be great even at 60 years old (no kicks/extreme body stress involved like many others athletic MAs), and the finding of a great sensei skilled in Aikido and KSR, two complementary arts, highly geared toward effectiveness and the martial aspect.

Now I'm completely addicted; I've started to journey in other cities to attend seminars, even if I'm doomed to get splattered around for 5+ hours due to my low rank.
I've found a lot of new friends (probably not an aikido specific feature, but it did'nt hurt ).
Overconfidence lead me to my first errors, like a gaffe on this forum I did on Saito Sensei (at the time, I didn't know who he was and didn't know that there are many styles of aikido besides Aikikai, and that each one of them has interesting aspects, how I've discovered after someone pointed me in that direction).
I spend nights reading book and watching videos; I even "train" alone sometimes in my house (I know, it sounds stupid, but my mae-ukemi need improvement )

Like you, I'm a quiet person and hate violence, but since my youth I cannot whitstand the idea that I cannot master my body... I have a body so I MUST be able to use it in the BEST way possible, not only in a pub brawl... even when walking, sitting, breathing.
To my eyes Aikido is great to accomplish this, and I'm looking forward for the next lesson, tomorrow evening.

Journey speaking, I'm still probably in the queue to buy the ticket compared to the majority of you all, and yet looks great... I'm excited like a guy the day before the vacation days, and cannot wait the time I'll reach the beach/sky/mountain/sea/snow like you "hakamized" guys out there

So yes, aikido changed my life, as volleyball did, my wife did, and my daughter will

Bye!

Last edited by Dario Rosati : 05-02-2004 at 06:55 PM.

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Old 05-02-2004, 07:44 PM   #17
Charles Hill
Dojo: Numazu Aikikai/Aikikai Honbu Dojo
Location: Three Lakes WI/ Mishima Japan
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 837
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Re: Aikido as a journey

Kaitlin,

It`s great you have made some fundamental changes in such a short time. In my case, they took much more time and I realize that I still have far to go. When I started practicing many years ago, I was extremely gung ho. Now I realize that I was ignoring how many of my partners felt and sometimes went too far in practice. A couple of years in, I heard that a woman in my dojo referred to me as a "beast." I heard it, but it took a long time to understand. Last year I visited my original dojo and heard that my 5th kyu test is still talked about. I was paired up with another "beast" and we really went at it. It was apparently the first time our shihan actually praised a 5th kyu test out loud. I was proud then, but was embarrassed much later to hear that that the test had become infamous for it`s degree of violence.

A number of years ago, I first heard the idea that the degree to which one`s practice is successful is not determined by how we threw or pinned our partners. It is determined by how willing our partners are to train with us again. I find that I can now engage in enjoyable practice for both of us while not losing any martial ability or focus. This has been a major change for me, but it is kind of embarassing to think about how long it took to learn something so obvious.

Good luck with your training.
Charles Hill
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Old 05-04-2004, 01:20 PM   #18
Lan Powers
Dojo: Aikido of Midland, Midland TX
Location: Midland Tx
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 659
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Re: Aikido as a journey

Hello Kaitlin,
I have to admit, You have a depth of articulation that is almost scary.
Not many folk have the skills to verbalize (after self-analysis) their deepest thoughts and emotions. My applause and envy.
As an aside, have you given thought to writing poetry and/or lyrics?

My own "journey" is much more mundane, middle aged guy who wants to better his physical as well as mental/emotional balance. A bit less "klutzy" than before. Less competetive, but just as driven if that makes sense?

Trust is hard. Practice and training puts us in trusting positions....trust or bow out. Makes you kind of HAVE to open up doesn't it?
Best wishes
Lan

Play nice, practice hard, but remember, this is a MARTIAL art!
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Old 05-04-2004, 02:35 PM   #19
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
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Re: Aikido as a journey

Quote:
trust or bow out.
Can I steal that????

RT

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 05-04-2004, 06:14 PM   #20
Lan Powers
Dojo: Aikido of Midland, Midland TX
Location: Midland Tx
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 659
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Re: Aikido as a journey

Absolutely!!
(I quote lots of the cool phrases from here....shhhh!)
Lan

Play nice, practice hard, but remember, this is a MARTIAL art!
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Old 05-05-2004, 04:25 AM   #21
KamiKaze_Evolution
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 125
Malaysia
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Re: Aikido as a journey

I'm totally agree that Aikido is our journal of survive, of course it isn't absolutely right if Aikido is something devotional. I watched an Aikido documentary in National Geographic Channel in last wednesday, there was appearance of the Doshu, Saito Hitohiro Sensei and Yamada Yoshimitsu Sensei and taken in Aikikai Ibaraki Shibu Dojo (formerly Iwama Dojo), Aikikai Hombu Dojo and some places of Wakayama seperately.

Budo and devotion are directly 2 different meanings, those such kodotama, funakogi, furitama, chinkon, etc have no meaning of worship or something. I'm a christian as well and feel comfortable of practice, but i feel sad of some christians are still don't understand yet about our budo because they're just keep their mind of what did holy bible wrote about then they don't absolutely accept that some christians are doing our budo also.

Aikido isn't a simply test of our daily life but a lesson, i rather keep my trip going ahead than stop in middle of the way. After a term of my own consideration, i decided to return my Aikido "home" in Malaysia Aikido Association HQ, Kuala Lumpur and joined a seminar by Shobukan Dojo of Kuala Lumpur with honor of shihans from Singapore an Kobe, Japan.

Have a nice keiko!
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Old 05-05-2004, 10:26 AM   #22
PeaceHeather
Dojo: hopefully Purdue Aikido Club
Location: Indiana
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 158
United_States
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Re: Aikido as a journey

Kaitlin,

Welcome to one of the most supportive places on the Net. I love it here, not just for the people who offer support to *my* vulnerabilities, but for all the *other* people who have the strength to come and show their inner selves here.

There's much too much to your post for me to respnd to right now; suffice to say that you are right, you were really blessed to find such supportive teachers. Good for you! I wish you well on your journey.

Peace,
Heather
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Old 05-05-2004, 04:33 PM   #23
Gabriel A
Location: Costa Rica
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 44
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Re: Aikido as a journey

"Welcome to one of the most supportive places on the Net. I love it here, not just for the people who offer support to *my* vulnerabilities, but for all the *other* people who have the strength to come and show their inner selves here."

Kaitlin, thanks you for sharing and opening that window into your story! I am soo new here, that most of the time I refrain from posting (due to ignorance) aikido is very new in my life. And I wish I had more, my schedules don't fit with my training.
But just browsing through the forums every day helps so much!! Everyday (and especially with posts like yours )
I am grateful, my world expands just a bit, but it fells like more. I train kyokushin, I have always been non-violent, but always have loved MA. I train kyokushin for work out, and now aikido for my mind!!

I would like to take advantage of the moment and thank you all for making my days with your posts!!

(BOWING)
Domo arigato
Gabriel

Last edited by Gabriel A : 05-05-2004 at 04:37 PM.

GREAT MINDS HAVE PURPOSES, OTHERS HAVE WISHES"
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Old 05-06-2004, 04:54 AM   #24
KamiKaze_Evolution
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 125
Malaysia
Offline
Re: Aikido as a journey

Quote:
Gabriel A wrote:
"Welcome to one of the most supportive places on the Net. I love it here, not just for the people who offer support to *my* vulnerabilities, but for all the *other* people who have the strength to come and show their inner selves here."

Kaitlin, thanks you for sharing and opening that window into your story! I am soo new here, that most of the time I refrain from posting (due to ignorance) aikido is very new in my life. And I wish I had more, my schedules don't fit with my training.
But just browsing through the forums every day helps so much!! Everyday (and especially with posts like yours )
I am grateful, my world expands just a bit, but it fells like more. I train kyokushin, I have always been non-violent, but always have loved MA. I train kyokushin for work out, and now aikido for my mind!!

I would like to take advantage of the moment and thank you all for making my days with your posts!!

(BOWING)
Domo arigato
Gabriel
Gabriel,

It's a quite greatful thread! Welcome to our Aikido world!

I did another art before Aikido, it was 8 years ago already. I started Aikido since 4 years ago and still in a quite shallow level, but i don't bother how deep is my current level and still try hard. Instead to totally agree of what did Kaitlin posted about, Aikido becomes a part of my life and my "best friend" ever as well.

Aikido is enough for me due to weak of spirit, it's a problem for combine my Aikido practice with martial arts else. I made a plan to combine it together with JKD but it's rates was not quite economic, i had no idea else then just getting my sole martial art practice.

Samurai spirit is harmony, peace and love, i belief that you understand it. So, we capture our opponent without ressits, struggle and collide. I don't just mean a technical matter, our daily life is included as well.

Have a nice day!
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