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Old 11-02-2000, 08:03 AM   #1
akiy
 
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Quote:
shadow wrote in a different thread:
I remember reading somewhere about every individual having their own style....I'm just wondering if you train under the one instructor for a long period of time do you think your style will mimick his in some kind of fashion?
Depends on the teacher. I've seen teachers who demand their students to be a replica of themselves, and then I've seen teachers who allow their students to express themselves as "who they are."

One thing to note is that if you take a look at the uchi deshi that Morihei Ueshiba sensei had, they're all pretty different...

-- Jun

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Old 11-02-2000, 08:49 AM   #2
lt-rentaroo
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Hello all,

I agree with what Jun has stated. Eventhough I've trained with the same Sensei for several years, I've adopted slightly different approaches to different technique (for example, the methods I use to teach new students). I believe that a good instructor will allow students to "grow" by encouraging them to seek out what works best for them. I've attended seminars where the guest instructor taught us that during Kotegaeshi, the nage should use one hand to hold onto uke's hand while the nage's other hand should be placed along the edge or "te-gatana" portion of uke's hand. And then I've been to seminars where the guest instructor taught us that nage should use both hands to hold onto uke's hand while applying the "twisting" movement. Both versions are undeniably Kotegaeshi. Who is to say that one version is right and the other wrong? I'm certainly not, and that is why I give my students the opportunity to use the method that works best for them. I don't expect my students to be exact duplicates of the way I perform Aikido. I provide them with the fundamentals and teach them the techniques that have been passed down to me by my sensei. If students only become mirrors of their Sensei, then how will they exceed the abilities of their Sensei? It is the goal of every parent that their children exceed their (the parents) accomplishments in life. I believe the same to be true of Aikido Sensei. This will only occur if the instructors allow their students to "grow" and use what works best for them.

LOUIS A. SHARPE, JR.
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Old 11-02-2000, 11:35 AM   #3
ian
 
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I think your 'style' is very much shaped by the sensei you start with. However I'm a firm believer that different things work for different people (due to strength, height, bodymass, speed, etc). I think the best thing to do is to do what works for you. This is the great thing about training on courses - you can try very different styles and pinch whatever you like from them, and disregard what you don't (but obviously after the course!).

I started off with a very hard style which was effective in the same way jujitsu is effective. I am gradually trying to soften this style as time goes on, but soft and effective seems to take me longer to achieve than hard an effective!
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Old 11-02-2000, 02:05 PM   #4
Erik
Location: Bay Area
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Quote:
akiy wrote:

Depends on the teacher. I've seen teachers who demand their students to be a replica of themselves, and then I've seen teachers who allow their students to express themselves as "who they are."

One thing to note is that if you take a look at the uchi deshi that Morihei Ueshiba sensei had, they're all pretty different...

-- Jun
I think it also depends on the student. I've been getting out quite a bit lately (if you are in the Bay Area be afraid, very afraid) and when people find out where I practice (always the first question) "jiu waza land" (my sarcasm but it's close to what people imply or I interpret them to imply) I'm often told by people that they want answers. People say they want to know how to do it. Or they just look at me like I'm crazy to hang out where I do--maybe they are the smart ones. I don't know if that extends to how to be but it seems possible to me.

I would agree that you will mimic on some level. I've used this phrase (paraphased) before and I like it. R. Bolles says "maybe you should have been an artist, craftsman, musician, but you've been wallowing with pigs for 20 years and pigs are your style". Do something a certain way for a long time and see if you can change--easily?
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Old 11-13-2000, 07:03 AM   #5
ian
 
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I was training with a high up sensei years ago and we did the 31 and 21 jo kata, starting with the other hand/stance, and also did all the suburi with the other hand, including shomen-uchi with our left hand forward. The sensei was very much of the idea that aikido is about body control. You can train the same way for years and years, but eventually that is all you can do. If you try a different approach every so often it not only gives you ideas, it also teaches you to be able to change the way you do things.
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