Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-13-2002, 08:51 AM   #26
Veers
 
Veers's Avatar
Dojo: Shinkikan Aikikai Aikido of Corpus Christi
Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 169
Offline
They aren't on it...but like I said, I could ask him if it comes down to that being the biggest deal. However, like I said, if he can teach it and teach it well, I don't really care about his lineage and stuff...his record, sure, but not his affiliation (with, of course, the excpetion that he's not a rogue and a bunch of Japanese with SMGs'll pay us a visit).

His record sounded good, only one broken bone in 7 years of teaching (several stretches and sprains, but nothing else serious.)

Then again, I'm learning about this, so, I know what sounds good to me (that is, he did, aside from the up front payment) but that doesn't mean I know what is for me. :]

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 08:56 AM   #27
Kevin Wilbanks
Location: Seattle/Southern Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 788
Offline
I just ran a Google search, and you've got 2 USAF dojos there, one under Tohei from Chicago, and one at A&M under Yamada. You really should go watch classes at both and talk to them about dues and stuff before you even think about giving this guy money. The fact that he's teaching 3 or 4 martial arts at once would be a major turn-off for me - especially since Karate is so different in terms of body dynamics and type of ingrained response to attack.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 08:58 AM   #28
Kevin Wilbanks
Location: Seattle/Southern Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 788
Offline
Also, that stuff about how many injuries and how unusual it is to let students use weapons in the first week sounds like advertising hype to me. Nobody at my old dojo or the club I've trained with here would feed you such lines. Try the other guys, so you have some kind of basis for comparison.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 09:02 AM   #29
Veers
 
Veers's Avatar
Dojo: Shinkikan Aikikai Aikido of Corpus Christi
Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 169
Offline
He doesn't teach them...only aikido...so, yeah, I don't really get why he's a member of those.

Yeah, I will check out the other guys for sure. Can you link me to their sites or information or something, or just give me string you searched with so I can get it? Thanks.

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 10:27 AM   #30
Leslie Parks
Dojo: Tenshinkan Dojo
Location: Chicago
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 41
Offline
Due Diligence

Independent dojos are not necessarily of lower quality or led by rogues, although unfortunately these conditions certainly exist. One could probably have high quality technical instruction, but led by a rogue...at some point one needs a foundation of character. The reason for independence could be for a myriad of reasons...so ask. I suppose we sound like a suspicious lot. This guy could be a good and well intentioned instructor. If he is, go for it. But check it out.

Given that this person is saying that he is certified to teach, as everyone else keeps pointing out, one must ask BY WHOM? Neither Kendo, Iaido, or Karate organizations have the authority to issue instructional certification for Aikido. Is he certified in these other arts and just using words to imply something that is not true? Or did he have prior certification from an organization that he subsequently left? (which would call that into question.)

Other pertinent questions:

Who is this person's instructor? What kind of relationship do they have?

Who is going to issue that 5th dan he is talking about?

Has he ever been a member of a legitimate organization? If yes, why is he not now? Is he planning to affiliate at a future date?

BTW, in review of the flyer:

In the intro page, "The curriculum and international certification available in our school of Aikido is not easily found elsewhere." so ????? who is it with?

"He said he is recognized to an extent but I didn't ask about that. " ASK and check references.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 10:42 AM   #31
rachmass
Dojo: Aikido of Cincinnati/Huron Valley Aikikai
Location: Somerset Michigan
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 794
Offline
Leslie makes very good points, as do all the others! Check him out thoroughly. BTW, being a USAF person myself, I would really look into those two dojos that Kevin mentioned a good look-see.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 11:52 AM   #32
Erik
Location: Bay Area
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 1,200
Offline
Came across this link:

http://www.creationcenter.com/boards...ssages/35.html

I can make an argument for not being affiliated. I can even make very good arguments for it. So, the more I think about it, the less I sweat that. The real question is who taught him.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 12:22 PM   #33
Deb Fisher
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 145
Offline
I have to agree with Opher - aikido is a commitment and time consuming and a lot of people quit doing it. If I were trying to make a living off a dojo, I wouldn't do this whole deposit thing (it's a little intense) but I would run a new to aikido special that involves paying for many months at a time. The monthly dues are less expensive than my dojo, which requires either an automatic deduction from ccard or checking account or paying for 3 or more months at a time, so all this sounds reasonable.

I guess my question is how does it feel to you? Does it feel reasonable and right? That's all that seems to matter.

Deb Fisher
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 12:48 PM   #34
Veers
 
Veers's Avatar
Dojo: Shinkikan Aikikai Aikido of Corpus Christi
Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 169
Offline
Yeah, Erik, he seemed like a great guy, very honest and I hardly had to prompt him for anything. Ok, so you can look at it two ways, he's honest and willing to help, or he's just got a salespitch down pat and hopes to pull in as many as possible with it. Personally, I think it's the former.

Anyway, to whoever said something about weapons training that early...why not? Aikido is based partly on sword techniques, so it's a good idea to understand that.

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 01:09 PM   #35
memyselfandi
Location: East Coast
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 55
Offline
I think the point was that many dojos start weapons work early so his dojo ain't so special (I could be wrong though...)

About the deposit thingy; from Veers description, it seems to me that he may need that deposit to stay afloat (the paying out of his pocket bit). While this makes it somewhat understandable, it also brings about another question. Why is he so unpopular that he needs that large a deposite even after teaching for 7 years? And no, I don't mean to imply anything, it just seemed like the next logical step...

just my $.02 (pretty worthless actually ...)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 02:23 PM   #36
Erik
Location: Bay Area
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 1,200
Offline
Quote:
Ari Fuchs (memyselfandi) wrote:
About the deposit thingy; from Veers description, it seems to me that he may need that deposit to stay afloat (the paying out of his pocket bit). While this makes it somewhat understandable, it also brings about another question. Why is he so unpopular that he needs that large a deposite even after teaching for 7 years? And no, I don't mean to imply anything, it just seemed like the next logical step...
According to the trade magazines most martial arts dojos have a 7% turnover, per month. At first when you think about it that seems high. Then when you think some more and realize how many people come and go it really seems about right. I know a lot of dojos which are still struggling along after more than 10 years.

There's another side to it too. The instructor has to be there everyday. A couple of weeks ago I showed up to teach and the only sound was one bokken swingin'. That bokken being the one held in my hands. It's a small group and that happens sometimes. The following week I was sick and couldn't make it. I sent off an email but apparently we couldn't swing a backup so we didn't open. I heard through the grapevine that one of the students was upset about it. OK fine, we said we'd be there, we weren't so I can understand it and we did fail. At the same time where was he the prior week?
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 02:30 PM   #37
Kevin Wilbanks
Location: Seattle/Southern Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 788
Offline
Veers,

You should learn to use Google. It isn't difficult. I typed in the search words 'aikido' 'corpus' 'christi'.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 03:46 PM   #38
Veers
 
Veers's Avatar
Dojo: Shinkikan Aikikai Aikido of Corpus Christi
Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 169
Offline
Thanks for nothing, I did that after I replied earlier. I don't want to take at the university, and that other place is too expensive.

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 03:49 PM   #39
JMCavazos
Dojo: Aikido Center of South Texas
Location: Houston,Tx
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 151
United_States
Offline
We are located in the Rio Grande Valley. One of my aikido mates (yondan) visited that particular dojo and was pleased with what he saw! He had only good to things to say about the sensei and recommended that if we were in the area, we might stop by and train with him.

So I tend to believe that the sensei's aikido is "real" aikido.

Now, about the fee..... I feel that for South Texas that fee is extremely high. Most dojos in the area charge around $40 per month. I also don't like the long term contracts. I teach at a fitness center and the charge is about $33 per month. Not only do you get aikido 3 times a week, but you have access to a weight gym, aerobics, yoga - and no long term contract.

That's the only thing that I would be concerned about.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 04:21 PM   #40
Kevin Wilbanks
Location: Seattle/Southern Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 788
Offline
Quote:
Jonathan Lyons (Veers) wrote:
Thanks for nothing, I did that after I replied earlier. I don't want to take at the university, and that other place is too expensive.
No problem. I'll make it a point not to burden you with my irritating assistance in the future.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2002, 05:31 PM   #41
Veers
 
Veers's Avatar
Dojo: Shinkikan Aikikai Aikido of Corpus Christi
Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 169
Offline
It wasn't irritating. *shrug* no hard feelings, just that if you're going to help, ok, if not, I don't really need your sarcasm, is all. I just didn't know if you included USAF or other keywords. I figured on "corpus christi aikido" but wasn't sure beyond that. That's all.

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2002, 07:28 AM   #42
Brian Crowley
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 54
Offline
I have lived and worked in a number of different cities of various sizes over the last 8 years and asking for that much cash up front is not a standard business practice in any of them. The instructor's explanations sound like BS to me.

When someone says it's not about the money, but then demands an unusual amount of money under some other pretext ("this way we only get comitted people") I am suspcious.

You are entitled to ask what style of Aikido this person studies, who is promoting him etc. Why not learn a little more about him and where he is coming from ?

Brian
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2002, 03:39 PM   #43
Veers
 
Veers's Avatar
Dojo: Shinkikan Aikikai Aikido of Corpus Christi
Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 169
Offline
Well, I e-mailed the OKF about him, and they sent me this:

It is with great pleasure that I have the opportunity to write to you in response to your inquiry into Mr. Dan Vella of Corpus Christi, Texas. The following will apply:

1. It is true that Sensei Dan Vella is a member in good standing of the Okinawan Karate Federation (Aikido Division) and has been for a number of years. His dedication to the Traditional Martial Arts is outstanding and without comparison in his field. We are very proud to count him as one of our members.

2. Further, if you have the opportunity to study with the man, please do so immediately. While his school and enrollment is small, this should be a very good indication that he is a strong and exact instructor. He is to be considered a man of Honor and lives by the old principals of the "Masters" who have passed on before us.

3. For the record, we only list the State and Counrty Representatives at this time, however, sometime within the very near future, it would be our intent to list all members within our database. We maintained our headquarters in Scottsdale, Arizona for almost seven (7) years and are just now finishing our Website and new additions since we have relocated to Las Vegas, Nevada.

4. We are pleased that you have take the time to contact us and we are further pleased that you provided us with the opportunity to relate our posture to you in this matter. We know that the selection of a Sensei or Dojo is extremely important in any individuals life, therefore, we understand and can appreciate your posture in this matter.

SUMMARY:

Our recommendation to you is to seek out the teachings of Mr. Dan Vella and learn all that you can. Keep a very close eye on the philosophy of this man and his chosen discipline. You will not regret one moment pursuant to your choice.

We want to take this opportunity to thank you for your time and consideration in this matter. Should you desire any further information on this individual and his Martial Arts, please do not hesitate to contact me personally at this headquarters. I respond to almost all of the inquires, as the Okinawan Karate Federation is a very close family of Traditional Martial Arts Practitioners who are dedicated to the true knowledge and methods of teaching.

::End::

So that answers the question about the federation buisness.

Anyway, I think I've made up my mind...if it works out, I'll go to his dojo unless I find somewhere else that offers similar practice scheduling at a major cost difference. Seeing as I'm willing to commit for at least a year, I'm not worried about the depostie thing. There's no reason I wouldn't be able to do it for a year there (and if I don't go out of town for college, even longer). I mean, I've heard nothing but good about this guy...so anyway.

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2002, 04:58 PM   #44
Richard Harnack
Dojo: Aikido Institute of Mid-America
Location: Maplewood, Missouri
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 137
Offline
Re: Choosing a dojo

Quote:
Jonathan Lyons (Veers) wrote:
Well, finally got over to the dojo to talk to the instructor about fees and such what. We talked for 45 minutes (he, myself, and my dad).

Ok, he said since he's had so many people leave after a month or so, I'd have to pay for the first quarter up front and then also the last quarter of the year up front, too...for a total of $395 up front (no payments until the first 3 months are up, then pay for the next three, then the next three, and then the last three of the year are already paid for). He said the last quarter's payment is a deposite and I can get it back if I need to quit before I get to it, but I have to notify him that I'm leaving. (which makes sense to me). The deposite did strike me as a bit unorthidox, but the price is fair, and I can go to any of the 5 classes a week (probably will make 2-3 depending on work).

He said that from what he'd heard me say and how I looked (physically, I guess he meant) that if I wanted a challenge (and I do) that it'd be for me.

Oh, also, he's independant from the Japanese family somthin'-or-other that owns aikido stuff...don't remember what he said and I didn't get it...somthing like the people who own the license or whatever. He's an authorzied teacher, but he does things a bit different (such as letting students train with weapons in their first week) but still teaches "pure" aikido.

Anyway, there's the scoop...your thoughts? "Go for it"? "Nooo!"? "Look around some more"?

Of course this all hinges on a job schedual...
1. Find out clearly what his organizational affiliation is. In my case I am an independent instructor, but I am affiliated with Seidokan Aikido. He may simply be telling you he is not a franchise operation.

2. What is his rank? Not that this will tell you anything, it will however give you some measure of how long he has been training. Be careful if he tells you something like 9th or 10th dan in Aikido. There just are not that many running around in the US. I am only aware of one 10th dan in the US and his was awarded to him by the organiztion he founded.

3. The first and last quarter deposit is unusual. Ask what happens to your last quarter deposit if he closes down. He may not have thought this through.

4. His sales pitch sounds like one promoted by certain contracting agencies. It is not necessarily bad, but it sometimes leaves a bad taste.

5. Lastly, back to the rank thing for a moment. If he is teaching other things besides Aikido, what are they and what is his rank in each? Years ago we had a guy in the larger metropolitan St Louis area who claimed to be a thrid degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do, Aikido and something else (I have forgotten what). What he actually had were three shodans "earned" from the time he was a child (TKD child shodan)over a period of 10 years. However, once he got his various shodans he stopped training in that art in order to collect another shodan. Hence three shodan = Sandan. By the time he got through misrepresenting himself and his training, he finally left town under cover of darkness to never be heard from again. Consequently. when his students found out that their ranks from him did not mean squat and that their training also did not amount to what he had told them, they were fairly well done with the martial arts in general.

This is all in the category of "be careful". A legitimate instructor, regardless of "sales pitch" will be able to answer all of these questions and show their certificates (if they are not already hanging up).

Good luck.

Yours In Aiki,
Richard Harnack
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2002, 07:38 PM   #45
Kent Enfield
 
Kent Enfield's Avatar
Location: Oregon, USA
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 224
United_States
Offline
Okinawan Karate Federation?

Mr. Lyons,

You found the Okinawan Karate Federation website, but maybe you didn't read the whole thing. To be honest, I didn't either. (I skimmed most of the history section.)

Before training with this guy, please read and consider the following from the OKF website:
Quote:
Question: Do I have to appear before a Certified Promotion Board in order to be considered for advancement as a Black Belt?

Normally YES...However the OKF has just recently introduced a New Testing Program that involves the submission of a quality video tape illustrating and containing the proficiency of the individual that desires to be considered for Rank Advancement. With the high cost of travel and uncertain employment schedules of most individuals, it is most often very difficult for an OKF registered Black Belt to travel to our headquarters for promotional reviews.
That's right. To get rank from this organization, all you have to do is send in a video tape of yourself (and some cash). That doesn't sound very legitimate to me, especially since the organization is a karate one that gives rank in any martial art.

I still can't figure out why he'd claim rank from the SUSKIF, as it awards rank only in kendo and iaido, just like the rest of the All US Kendo Federation.

Last edited by Kent Enfield : 09-14-2002 at 07:44 PM.

Kentokuseisei
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2002, 07:41 PM   #46
Brian Crowley
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 54
Offline
Jonathan,

This Okinawan Karate Federation looks like a scam to me. Check out their "membership application":

http://www.okf1956.org/forms/memberApp.cfm

They also sell black belt certificates, titles, and host of other crap. For the right price it looks like you can get all kinds of impressive credentials - and they do not appear to require much in the way of qualifications. I'm pretty sure that for a couple hundred bucks you too could have a membership and a very nice title.

To my mind, the fact that he belongs to this organization is another hit to his credibility.

This guy MIGHT be fine, but frankly the very few things that you have posted put up a lot of red flags to me. I advise you tread VERY carefully given how much money he is asking for up front.

Brian
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2002, 09:16 PM   #47
Veers
 
Veers's Avatar
Dojo: Shinkikan Aikikai Aikido of Corpus Christi
Location: Corpus Christi, Texas
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 169
Offline
Richard, he's a 4th Dan.

Kent, I will be sure to ask other Aikido instructors in town about him.

Brian, he told me his sensei's name, but I don't remember it. Ok, so they sell stuff giving the impression that they're throwing it about. But like I said, affiliation doesn't really matter to me. It's his skill at teaching that does. I'm just still trying to decide if he's worth the up-front risk.

Again, Seeing as I'm willing to commit for at least a year, I'm not worried about the depostie thing as far as loosing it goes. There's no reason I wouldn't be able to do it for a year there (and if I don't go out of town for college, even longer)

The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2002, 11:56 PM   #48
DaveO
Dojo: Great Wave Aikido
Location: Alberta, Canada
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 543
Canada
Offline
Johnathan:

Shortly before I graduated from high school and joined the Army, I signed up for a beginner's course in Jiu-jitsu in what is considered one of the largest, most well-respected dojos in town. Back then, I knew nothing about MA or fighting, and the sensei's name was quite well-respected, but even then, after a couple classes I could tell I was being handed a line. Phrases like: 'Jiu Jitsu was created by monks as spititual awareness' and 'a more peaceful version of NinJitsu' were used. On the mat, said sensei would say things like: 'Success is won by total peace. Meditate on this.' We'd then sit with our eyes closed for forty-five minutes. No exaggeration. So, I stopped going, and joined a Karate dojo instead.

But I didn't read the fine print.

Students were required to pay by the month, but the contract was annual. I recieved my call-up to Basic Training, proceeded through it (16 weeks) and Battle School (16 more weeks) and wound up at my Regiment after a 6-week Base Defence temporary posting to find a huge suprise waiting for me. I'd been sued - in absentia - for a years worth of classes I never took; over $900. Since I hadn't responded to payment requests for months, (This had gone to my future Regiment, not to me, in typical Army style) I had to fight off a bad credit rating for the next seven years.

Jonathan, the reason for this sob-story is simple: The Sensei I dealt with was on the surface a real nice guy, friendly, a great salesman. He appeared a consummate professional. He was - at collecting fees. In the years since, I encountered numerous students of his who demonstrated shocking lack of ability and, I must say courtesy, in the MA. I also ran in to one or two with similar stories to mine. One girl; who quit after being diagnosed with diabetes, was sued as well; while she was in the hospital. Remember too, this is considered one of the most respected dojos in town - having a big advertising budget will do that for you.

How does this relate to your situation?

Read the OKF's description again - the phrases are flowery, overblown and formulaic. They're exactly what you'd expect from a used car salesman; not an answer to a serious query. It provides no information at all on the sensei, just heaps of lavish praise for someone they don't have listed. Any bets on whether or not the OKF takes a cut of his fees?

He may be a 4th Dan, but I'm more than a little suspicious about his credentials; both how he got them and how he uses them.

In the final count, Johnathan, the majority of the people voicing their concerns to you here are at least Shodan rank; please respect their judgement in this matter. You might be willing to lose the money; that's your choice, after all, but don't lose it foolishly. While an independent Dojo can be on the up-and-up and very good, the possibility for chicanery is too great. If you want to learn Aikido, learn it from an accredited Dojo, where you can be sure of the curriculum AND the Sensei.

IMHO, of course.

Dave

Answers are only easy when they're incomplete.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2002, 02:21 AM   #49
G DiPierro
Location: Ohio
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 365
United_States
Offline
Veers,

This dojo has sounded suspiscious since your first post and almost all of the additional information makes it seem more so.

Certification is more important than you might think for reasons that will make sense after you spend a few years in the art. I am wary of the endorsement of the Okinawan Karate Federation, especially since they are a Karate federation. The letter you received from them just doesn't sound right to me. Some quotes:

"2. Further, if you have the opportunity to study with the man, please do so immediately." Why immediately? So you don't have time to change your mind?

"While his school and enrollment is small, this should be a very good indication that he is a strong and exact instructor." By what crazy logic? The best aikido teachers have large schools with many advanced students.

"He is to be considered a man of Honor" Maybe that just means that he is currently paid on his organzation dues.

"and lives by the old principals (sic) of the "Masters" who have passed on before us." And which "Masters" would those be?

He claims on his flyer an affiliation with "Aikido Hombu Dojo." Acutally, this is rather clever since there is no such thing. By not specifically mentioning an Aikido organization, he cannot be accused of false advertising. Or perhaps he meant that the OKF has it's own "Aikido Hombu Dojo." Now that would be really clever.

Even if you don't care about this lack of certification, how would you go about judging his skill in teaching? Have you observed a class or two? Have you talked to both senior and junior students to see what kind of people they are and what they think of the dojo? Have you observed the way he treats his students and the way they treat each other? The whole point of certification is that more experienced people must evaluate a teacher because less experienced people do not have the neccesary knowledge to do so for themselves.

The issue really isn't the deposit, it's whether you want seek instruction from this person. For example, his statement "if you're not willing to work at it and pull a few muscles in the first week or two" really worries me. I have trained with teachers known for having very hard and aggresive styles and I can't imagine anyone ever pulling even ONE muscle in the first week or two, let alone "a few." Beginners can get injured accidentally, but I just can't imagine how it would be posible for them to practice in such a way as to get THAT kind of injury THAT early on, at least not by doing aikido. Nor can I imagine why they would want to.

Personally, I recommend finding another dojo, one that is at least affiliated with one of the many recognized styles of Aikido.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2002, 06:45 AM   #50
Kevin Wilbanks
Location: Seattle/Southern Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 788
Offline
You guys are talking a fine line of sensible advice, but I think you're missing the big picture here. Look at the overall thread: you're talking to a peevish kid who isn't really looking for advice. He asked for opinions on the place, and when they came up mostly negative, he argued with everyone and defended the place. He's already admitted that he has dismissed the other two dojos with legit connections in town out of hand. I think y'all are wasting your wisdom.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Handmade Aikido Gifts - Handmade functional ceramic art with aikido themes



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ueshiba vs. Gun Squad aikido_fudoshin General 126 02-04-2009 05:54 PM
Video of Seichiro Endo Shihan grondahl General 114 10-19-2006 09:29 AM
Financial Obligations and Sensei anonymous Anonymous 19 07-24-2006 11:41 AM
Aiki Expo Thoughts (Long!) akiy Seminars 5 09-29-2003 10:15 PM
Seminar/Event: Saito Sensei Seminar Update AikiWeb System AikiWeb System 0 09-17-2001 01:15 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:15 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate