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Old 07-12-2014, 06:14 PM   #26
kewms
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Quote:
Jason Rudolph wrote: View Post
I certainly agree that anyone committed to his or her art or craft would learn after 20 years. I know I have! However, what I am saying is that I (and may others) have still seen him demonstrating techniques in a way that is consistent with the quote from Aikido and the Harmony of Nature. In other words, the majority of what he demonstrated from what I have seen is consistent with that. As I said, sure, he has shown other things that could be described as "tricks" but they are the minority in my experience and could hardly represent a paradigm shift brought about by some new insight into IS. He has explained the exercises were for pretty consistently. It just basically comes down to how one defines "Aiki" and what I am saying is the vast majority of what he is demonstrating from what I and others have seen and experienced is consistent with the quote. I would certainly not say that what he is doing had not evolved just that it is consistent with the Aiki as he had defined it which is the blending of energy. At least that has been my experience.
Look closer.

Katherine
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Old 07-12-2014, 06:30 PM   #27
Chris Li
 
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

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Katherine Derbyshire wrote: View Post
I'm aware of that; the person to whom I was responding didn't seem to be.

Katherine
Sure, that's really who the comment was aimed at.

Best,

Chris

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Old 07-14-2014, 07:33 AM   #28
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

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I am also a student under Saotome sensei in ASU and based on my experiences with sensei and others whom I know and train with, your description of his teaching does not reflect at least what I have seen and heard from him at seminars as well as private teaching at the shrine. I have not noticed any substantial changes in his teachings over the past few years. I have seen him teaching waza with committed attacks from Uke and drawing upon techniques that depend utilizing the momentum from Uke's attack. While it is certainly accurate from my experience with him that he teaches other things that resemble exercises or slow motion technique.

However, when he does so I do not believe he is teaching what you refer to as "aiki" (the definition of aiki being internal strength). It is certainly possible for one to read into these exercises and see something else though. However, over the years Sensei has explained what most of them are for so there would be no need to guess what they mean. Typically, they address blending, being flexible and being willing to change. An example would be a static ikkyo that connects to the shoulder or the blending with very small amount of energy. Also, you mention the push tests from Ki Society as an example of people doing what you are defining as "aiki" training for the aiki body, but it is my understanding that Ki Society under Tohei believe their grounding ability results from the projection of Ki not IS. Not true?

Finally, sensei may do a few things that are about connecting in a way that you are defining as "aiki" but those are by far a minority of what he demonstrates in my experience and certainly IMO doesn't constitute a paradigm shift in his teaching. The majority of what Saotome sensei is describing in my experience is blending with Uke's energy to get kuzushi, to discombobulate.

"Aikido techniques depends on blending with the force of the attack. It is that force which determines the movement....." Page 180 Aikido and the Harmony of Nature

Again, its just my observation and the experience of those whom I train or interact with who train with Sensei too.

Train Hard,
Jason
I think some other posts have provided some clarification already, but I'll and in my comments.

First, I think Saotome Sensei is a genius. I am not saying he only teaches one type of seminar, or that he limits what he shows during his seminars. I am describing the experiences I have seen and your mileage may vary.

Second, I also contend that sensei believes everything he does is aiki. I think he has changed his teaching to try different avenues of sharing what he knows. I would be more concerned if sensei showed the same technique he taught 30 years ago. I think this is the difference between walking on a path and resting at a point on the path. In my case, I want to be on Sensei's heels - not the point he was at 30 years ago.

Third, I do not want to confuse anyone. I did not refer to stylized aikido as an example of push test demonstration, I referred to individuals. I am not of the mind that any style of aikido has replicated a solid curriculum of training internals. While already mentioned, I would also clarify that internal power is not aiki, simple a pre-requisite to aiki.

I used sensei because I believe he is a great example of a shihan embracing not just a curriculum, but the transmission of aiki. I think he is trying to pound into our heads aiki is not twisting a wrist or running at your partner so they can throw you.

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Old 07-14-2014, 01:01 PM   #29
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

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I think some other posts have provided some clarification already, but I'll and in my comments.

First, I think Saotome Sensei is a genius. I am not saying he only teaches one type of seminar, or that he limits what he shows during his seminars. I am describing the experiences I have seen and your mileage may vary.

Second, I also contend that sensei believes everything he does is aiki. I think he has changed his teaching to try different avenues of sharing what he knows. I would be more concerned if sensei showed the same technique he taught 30 years ago. I think this is the difference between walking on a path and resting at a point on the path. In my case, I want to be on Sensei's heels - not the point he was at 30 years ago.

Third, I do not want to confuse anyone. I did not refer to stylized aikido as an example of push test demonstration, I referred to individuals. I am not of the mind that any style of aikido has replicated a solid curriculum of training internals. While already mentioned, I would also clarify that internal power is not aiki, simple a pre-requisite to aiki.

I used sensei because I believe he is a great example of a shihan embracing not just a curriculum, but the transmission of aiki. I think he is trying to pound into our heads aiki is not twisting a wrist or running at your partner so they can throw you.
I disagree that internal power is a "prerequisite" of aiki. They are just two different things. I suppose if you are an internal power type you are going to see things in Saotome Sensei's material that makes sense in that light, but he really doesn't teach anything about internal power, and internals are not a requirement to make most of what he does work.
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Old 07-14-2014, 01:17 PM   #30
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

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I disagree that internal power is a "prerequisite" of aiki. They are just two different things. I suppose if you are an internal power type you are going to see things in Saotome Sensei's material that makes sense in that light, but he really doesn't teach anything about internal power, and internals are not a requirement to make most of what he does work.
I find this idea quite thought provoking. Interesting even. I am of the mind that power is very important. I remember that Kanetsuka Sensei (UK) produced very soft Aikido but his structure was solid as a rock. He didn't teach anything about power though - but he was very powerful. In fact, his Aikido was kind of like Chiba's in that it was - obviously very powerful - and then he got cancer and he became soft, then he overcame the cancer, and he remained soft - but power lurked behind it, hidden. And so, all his students followed. But they were following his journey, and his route had included power. If I remember correctly (I could be wrong - I was a nobody back then), some senior students quit at that time and joined a different organisation - perhaps because of this - so it is important to consider.

Anyway, I believe power to be very important. Even, I would say, the more you have the better (both internal and external), but we choose not to use the external, instead finding a more efficient way to do it (internal). But even then, the thing is, we must still work on developing our power (internal and external) and maintaining it. We should be a strong as we can be for our own body on both the inside and the outside. I am not advocating weight training here, rather, just that one should be extra fit (compared to the average guy). And unless you train regularly, Aikido is not enough to get you fit, which is another problem entirely.

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Old 07-14-2014, 02:19 PM   #31
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

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I find this idea quite thought provoking. Interesting even. I am of the mind that power is very important. I remember that Kanetsuka Sensei (UK) produced very soft Aikido but his structure was solid as a rock. He didn't teach anything about power though - but he was very powerful. In fact, his Aikido was kind of like Chiba's in that it was - obviously very powerful - and then he got cancer and he became soft, then he overcame the cancer, and he remained soft - but power lurked behind it, hidden. And so, all his students followed. But they were following his journey, and his route had included power. If I remember correctly (I could be wrong - I was a nobody back then), some senior students quit at that time and joined a different organisation - perhaps because of this - so it is important to consider.

Anyway, I believe power to be very important. Even, I would say, the more you have the better (both internal and external), but we choose not to use the external, instead finding a more efficient way to do it (internal). But even then, the thing is, we must still work on developing our power (internal and external) and maintaining it. We should be a strong as we can be for our own body on both the inside and the outside. I am not advocating weight training here, rather, just that one should be extra fit (compared to the average guy). And unless you train regularly, Aikido is not enough to get you fit, which is another problem entirely.
I don't think there is any power there at all, particularly when I get my hands on one of my high-level teachers. I think power is a poor conceptual fit to aiki in general (as well as the core principals of koryu arts i have studied).

When I have hands on a high-level person, what strikes me is that I don't feel anything. it is not that it is "strange" or "unconventional" power - it is that it is not power.

Another thing the concept of "power" is a poor conceptual fit with, in my very humble opinion, is the Chinese classics.

(Well, the idea that it is a worthwhile thing to have or develop, anyway)
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Old 07-14-2014, 02:20 PM   #32
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

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I disagree that internal power is a "prerequisite" of aiki. They are just two different things. I suppose if you are an internal power type you are going to see things in Saotome Sensei's material that makes sense in that light, but he really doesn't teach anything about internal power, and internals are not a requirement to make most of what he does work.
Denier.

This is currently above my pay grade, but I am working on it. If internal power is integral to "ki", then "aiki" would necessarily have "ki" (and internal power). I am still waiting to hear how internal power squares up to "ki", but my guess is they are related, if not synonymous.

I am convinced Sensei is doing internals and doesn't even distinguish it - it's just what he does and who he is. Same with Ikeda sensei. While possibly a topic for another thread, I don't think there is anything wrong with doing good jujutsu and I don't think you need internals for doing them. But without aiki, you're doing a different art - even if it looks the same. I think the question is actually at what point do we consider technique without aiki to cease being "aikido". There has to be some level, because when we begin, clearly no one is doing aiki - we are trying our best to not trip over our feet. We still call it aikido, but at some point the expectation shifts beyond jujutsu.

Or... can aikido function without an internal component?

Somewhat bending back around to my distinction that we have a problem if the only instance in which we can demonstrate "aiki" is by doing jujutsu waza... Maybe the only thing we are demonstrating is jujutsu.

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Old 07-15-2014, 01:13 PM   #33
David Orange
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

I think the recently discovered 1968 film of O Sensei at hombu dojo can provide much perspective here. Just as I was thinking that it proved that O Sensei was moving relative to uke as a main element of aiki, he started doing things without moving. Tossing big guys around with little or no shifting or turning. He directly absorbed the force and directly returned it, almost without movement, producing huge lift in the uke, sending him flying.

So I would say that aiki first involves complete control of one's own body and position in space. I recently reviewed several hours of incredible video footage of Seigo Okamoto sensei, showing his roppokai method close up, in slow motion, from various angles. The techniques range from small (very small) to relatively large and they're generally all very simple. But they produce instant, large response in the attacker. One thing I noticed about Okamoto sensei is that his body is incredibly stable through every movement. The weight of uke never impinges on him and even when he throws the uke and holds his arm, dragging him back across the floor, Okamoto may step, but that's all. His body never bends or wobbles and he doesn't stumble because he only makes small steps for the most part. But his techniques express aiki in very small, smooth, subtle movements.

So the second element of aiki, after complete ownership of self and place, is that it creates instant lift in anyone who lays hands or exerts force on this self-possessed body. And by "lift," I mean loss of relation to the earth's gravity. By exerting force on the aiki body, trying to find its moveable center, they orient themselves primarily to the firmness and solidity of that body. Small, subtle movements of the aiki body draw that attachment by suggesting solidity where it can be removed, or inviting entry to a place where he finds himself with no strength. Technically, this is aiki age, lifting the attacker on contact, but it can also express as aiki sage, which drops him. And I guess that's what O Sensei and Shioda sensei show when the attacker is rather frozen in place.

To me, that's the "blending" of aiki--first having firm possession of self and place, then causing the attacker to orient his physical balance to his perception of the aiki body's strong or weak points (which are falsely presented) to result in his suddenly rising, falling or being suspended in place (basically, double-weighted).

As to kata, it's finally unnecessary to aiki or aiki expression, though it's really hard to learn aiki without some form. Before I benefited by the reasoning of both Dan Harden, Mike Sigman and Rob John, but after I lived with Mochizuki sensei, I understood that aikido was generally being taught "backward," through fairly complicated sequences of movement. Through Mochizuki sensei's method of instruction (applying Kano's rationality and physics awareness to Ueshiba's aikido), I learned that judo, aikido, karate and sword can all be performed with the same small handful of basics beginning with standing upright and walking. And I perceived this "lifting" in the attacker's body and was searching for ways to cause it to overact, but I didn't yet realize the principles of aiki age and aiki sage, so I had to get help from Dan, Mike, Ark and Rob and also study and feel other people's strength to begin to get the idea.

Anyway, as we can see in the 1968 films of O Sensei, he does some things with "technique" we can recognize, "blending" by moving off-line and turning, but at other times, he directly accepts uke's strength straight-on, yet doesn't let it settle on him. "Re-directing," in these examples, is often straight back where it came from, which is not what we normally think of as "blending."

So kata and form are useful but without the basic engine of aiki, those forms can very easily lead people into a mush of pretentious off-showing that would lead to disaster against a serious attacker. This will not happen if uke remains honest and gives sincere attacks, and doesn't fall unless nage's movement (or non-movement) breaks his balance involuntarily and forces him to recover. Teaching uke to fall, regardless of the technique, is a sign of no aiki in the technique or in the teaching.

As mentioned above, start with some push testing and see what that tells. Aiki can scarcely be observed by the eye but it can be felt at once in the body.

"That which has no substance can enter where there is no room."
Lao Tzu

"Eternity forever!"

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Old 07-18-2014, 07:28 PM   #34
Gavin Slater
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

I don't think it is a good idea to want to become powerful or get some unusual power, or to even think there is some magical UP POWER!.
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Old 07-20-2014, 01:13 PM   #35
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

"勁" and "power". Yeah very different connotations. In Asian culture, you're trying to become physically strong for the purposes of health and martial ability. You can also use variants of it to help heal others. Ain't nothing wrong with that.

Mert
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Old 07-21-2014, 07:34 PM   #36
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Are you still talking about aiki?
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Old 07-21-2014, 09:33 PM   #37
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

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Are you still talking about aiki?
"Power", as in what's normally translated from Chinese into English as "internal power", within the gamut of which aiki falls.

Mert
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Old 07-22-2014, 01:10 AM   #38
Carsten Möllering
 
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

@ Gavin:

How do you translate or understand "ryoku" like in kokyu ryoku?
What does it feel like for you being tori, when you put "more energy/ki" into your throws?
Do you experience the feeling to be "more powerfull" when you are relaxed, ki is flowing, your posture and connection to uke ist good?

Which word do you use, when you, being uke, are stamped into the ground. Not by muscular force but by softness, technical good waza, experience, use of center ... and all that? Soft but ...? (I would say powerful.) If it is not power for you, wich word does express this capability of tori in your language use?

Last edited by Carsten Möllering : 07-22-2014 at 01:16 AM.
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Old 07-22-2014, 06:14 AM   #39
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Hi Carsten,

My main point was that I dont think it is a good idea to want to become powerful, like it is the most important thing. I think it is more important to understand what it is, to do that I think you need also accept it is also not about power. If you are only concerned about becoming powerful then when do you stop? How powerful do you need to get? How do you know you are powerful? What's the point?

In regards to kyoku ryoku. If I had to use english I would say it is like influencing someone to do something, or making someone do something.

Feelings are subjective but I will try and answer your questions;
What does it feel like being tori? I would say it feels free, im not sure what you mean by putting more ki into my throws. I dont think you throw people away.
Yes the more relaxed you are, the more freedom you have.
It depends what you mean by your connection to uke is good? You could say there is no connection to uke.

Gavin
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Old 07-22-2014, 06:58 AM   #40
Cliff Judge
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

I am with Gavin here; the orientation around the concept of "power" in this sub-comminity seems a bit corny to me, slightly childish. It may just be a choice of words, but when working with internal training methods involving imagery and intent, words can color the whole practice. Every time I pick up the Tao Te Ching it seems like I can just pick a page at random and I find a passage warning about how you can never really cultivate ki if you are looking for power.

I may have mentioned this already in this thread but when I take ukemi for one of my high level teachers it feels like absolutely nothing is throwing me. I hope to cultivate less and less power as I train and more and more nothing.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:51 AM   #41
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

I think there is a cross-definition of power going on... Maybe some clarification helps. I have seen at least 4 contexts of "power" ...

Internal power is just another kind of mechanic to generate kinetic force. Muscles are just one kind of power source. So is gravity. In this sense, we are talking about the engine of kinetic energy - movement. If you are doing waza, you are moving and using power. The question really is, what is moving you?

Second, we have an imagery to help craft the recognition and restraint of using muscles you don't need. This is "relax". If you have been told to relax, you are using too many external muscles. It's not that you should not use power to move, its that you are using muscle power to move (as opposed to the unspoken "internalization" of the movement).

Third, we have a philosophy to help craft the intent that leads our movement. Our intent should not focus on doing something to someone, but rather liberating our personal freedom to be unaffected by others. In this sense, "power" refers to the will of dominion over another - the desire to do something to someone.

Forth, we have an education to help craft our decisions and prioritize our actions. This is a concrete expression of action and reaction. In this sense, power is a physical force that we can receive and we can apply. Sunadomari made "take away power" famous in his aikido friendship demo, referring to the process of removing a partner's ability to apply power into nage.

"Internal power" for me is the very specific use of internal mechanics to transfer my potential energy into kinetic energy. If you are talking about anything external to yourself, then you are not talking about "internal power." At best, you are talking about the affect internal power has on others.

Given Gavin's comments concerning his idea of kokyu rokyu doing something to somebody, I think he is not talking about internal power. There is no magical power. Internal power is unusual in that it is a rewiring of human function that requires effort and is not intuitive. But then, isn't gravity unusual power? Watch a baby try to stand against gravity and see the affect gravity has on the baby. Sure, we figure out the tricks to deal with gravity (by wiring our body to move...), but that baby represents a sincere perspective of the power of gravity. After all, isn't gravity fundamental to the concept of kuzushi?

To Cliff's point... If you consider power to be muscular, yes, i think the use of muscular effort is not conducive to cultivating ki* (*somewhat vague). Best example... Imagine loosing an arrow from a bow:
1. Could you push the string with your arm faster that the string can release its kinetic energy?
2. Could you throw an arrow farther than a bow can shoot an arrow?
The build of potential energy is created by drawing the bow, not loosing it. Releasing the string is what converts the potential energy into kinetic energy. The string affects the notched arrow by accelerating it during its return to zero energy state. The result is the arrow is projected into the air. The bow example can both illustrate the inefficiency of where we apply force (pushing the string) and the difference in applied force (the range of comparative arrows).

My thinking... FWIW

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Old 07-22-2014, 02:00 PM   #42
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Power is important. Get used to it. You need to end up with more, not less. And why do people always think power is just physical strength? But, the irony is, you must learn not to use that power. That's the difficult part.

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Old 07-22-2014, 03:59 PM   #43
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

If we assign the connotations of "power" in the western sense to "勁", yeah again, that's limiting. Look at the English terms in addition to "strength" attributed to the Chinese version of the term in Google Translate to illustrate this (not that Google Translate is complete or infallible, but it's interesting to note that the noun synonyms provided do not include "power").

That said, the folks in the IP subset of this community in general are seeking greater, more efficient ability in their respective martial arts. Individual goals are wide ranging within that gamut. Given this is martial arts, even if on the edges of the bell curve someone's seeking power for the sake of simply taking out people more expediently, well that also fits within the gamut. And besides a number of the aiki greats, including Ueshiba, specifically sought and demonstrated it in this context. As a member of the Hawaii martial arts community who encountered Ueshiba during the founder's later years recounts, Ueshiba reversed this man's attack (which came from behind without warning) and readily held him to the ground with a single hand, suggesting it was like subduing a child. That was an unequivocal premeditated show of "power".

Last edited by Mert Gambito : 07-22-2014 at 04:04 PM.

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Old 07-22-2014, 07:25 PM   #44
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Hi,

I guess everyone has a different idea. I can only say what I was taught in respect to kyoku / kyoku jime I was told it was influencing your enemy (or making your enemy do what you want) with your breath. Uke/tori wasn't really used like in judo.

I just think no matter what you believe aiki is, whether it is internal power, bow theory or big fat jelly men you also need to believe it is not that as well.

Gavin
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Old 07-23-2014, 03:09 AM   #45
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

I am sorry, I have to take a little detour: I don't understand your following statements:

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Gavin Slater wrote: View Post
... im not sure what you mean by putting more ki into my throws. I dont think you throw people away.
Yes. I do. Of course I do. To me that is what the nage waza are about?
(To be more precise, we try to not throw uke away, but try to throw him directly down to the ground between our feet. But I think this does not make a difference in regard to the topic here?)
And you can choose whether to do that more intense, more vigorous, more energatically. - Or not.
One means of steering of how intense your throw becomes is where to lead your ki, and how much to lead there.

In graduation exams of sandan or yondan I hear the request to not hold back, but put more ki into the waza from time to time.

When you say, you don't throw uke away, I think I don't understand which way you are dealing with uke? Well if he is not throwing himself, it tori who has to?
Maybe there is a vid on youtube, that can help me to understand, what you mean?

Quote:
Gavin Slater wrote: View Post
... influencing your enemy (or making your enemy do what you want) with your breath. Uke/tori wasn't really used like in judo.
Same thing here: What does that mean, that uke "wasn't realy used"? Don't you touch him or grab him? And if not, how then do you make him go down?

Maybe that the coordinate systems of our ways of doing and understanding aikidō is different, so that things like power, strength etc. have completely different place in each case?

---
With regard to power:

For sure "power" is not what I am first of all looking for, but it is part of the outcome of my practice. And "power" for sure does not mean muscular strength. And it does not mean intellectual or spiritual dominance.

In practicing aikidō it is brought forth by using yin and yang, by not relying on muscles but on the internal structure and natural organisation of the body.
And it is brought forth in the same way by living the dao. It is a power that even while it does nothing, leaves nothing undone. A power that even while it is empty, generates the 10,000 things inexhaustible.
I think, dao is very powerfull. As long as you are not searching for power but searching for the dao. And I think, aikidō is a way of practicing the dao.
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Old 07-23-2014, 05:55 AM   #46
Gavin Slater
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Hi Carsten,

When I say uke/tori wasn't really used, I mean the terms were not really used i.e. the attacker was never called uke. They were always referenced as the enemy. Nothing to do with dealing with uke etc.

In Daito Ryu there are no throws, you don't throw the enemy away.

Maybe our understanding of aiki is very different, mine comes from Daito Ryu. I'm not sure why you use chinese terms like yin/yang and the dao when you study aikido?

I dont think 'power' is muscular strength. I just said I don't think you should want to become powerful.

Gavin
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:01 AM   #47
Carsten Möllering
 
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Thank you!
I was completely on the wrong track! Whyever ..

Quote:
Gavin Slater wrote: View Post
Maybe our understanding of aiki is very different, mine comes from Daito Ryu.
I use to practice with some students of Endō sensei who also practice Daitō ryū Roppokai. At least our understanding of aiki goes together.

Quote:
I'm not sure why you use chinese terms like yin/yang and the dao when you study aikido?
Those terms - and others - are frequently used in my aikido world. And Ueshiba himself also did so.
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Old 07-23-2014, 09:06 AM   #48
Cliff Judge
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Quote:
Carsten Möllering wrote: View Post
Thank you!
I was completely on the wrong track! Whyever ..

I use to practice with some students of Endō sensei who also practice Daitō ryū Roppokai. At least our understanding of aiki goes together.

Those terms - and others - are frequently used in my aikido world. And Ueshiba himself also did so.
Didn't he use the terms in and yo? I've wondered about the use of Chinese terms sometimes too, though it makes sense when someone "up the chain" has done some serious study of Chinese martial arts, which is the case for several of my instructors.
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Old 07-23-2014, 02:18 PM   #49
MRoh
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Quote:
Cliff Judge wrote: View Post
Didn't he use the terms in and yo?
I think he used izanami and izanagi.
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Old 07-23-2014, 02:30 PM   #50
jonreading
 
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Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

I am not sure how much "published" works of the founder would survive using Chinese terminology. I think there are some good points in Hidden in Plain Sight that talk about the impact of Chinese martial arts and culture on O Sensei.

Mostly, I think think some Chinese terminology more explicitly defines difficult concepts often left to implicit instruction in Japanese martial arts.

Also, I have found that when I work with very powerful people, my ukemi is less about letting them do something to me and more about proactively protecting myself. I am not getting "thrown" so much as I am actively working to protect my body. Even if I am being pinned, I am working to protect my body from being damaged by the pin.

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