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Old 06-29-2013, 06:43 AM   #1
arjandevries
Dojo: Ima Juku
Location: Amersfoort
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 102
Netherlands
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Lesson plans

Hi all,

Would it not be interesting to share out thoughts about lessonplans.
I have mixed groups of adults from 22 to 73 y.o.
From mu kyu to up and coming shodan this summer.

I find it very difficult to offer all the kyu material from all kyugrades. They can practise twice a week. 50% is doing so.

I teach the technical line of Suganuma Sensei from Fukuoka, Japan so the basics of Aikido are very important. Also there is technical guidance in our organisation of Dr. Peter Goldsbury.

So I choose to mostly offer principals like timing, bodypower, distance etc. I use techniques to explain them. Further more I try to combine certain techniques so there will be a didactic structure in the lessons. Off course I keep track of the kyu requirements as well but I do not hold a score so to speak. This means offering techniques who are close to each other.

They always have time after practise to work on there own techniques.

I would like to hear from you how you handle all the different examination requirements during the year.
Do you for example keep record of the techniques you offered in the dojo?

Should be a fine discussion! Perhaps we can learn from each other.

Best wishes,

Arjan
4th dan Ima Juku Dojo cho
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Old 08-11-2013, 03:30 PM   #2
Mary Eastland
 
Mary Eastland's Avatar
Dojo: Berkshire Hills Aikido
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,156
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Re: Lesson plans

I don't use lesson plans but I just wanted you to know that someone read your post and thought it was interesting.

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Old 08-12-2013, 04:54 PM   #3
Robert Cowham
Dojo: East Sheen Aikido and Kashima No Tachi
Location: London, UK
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 229
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Re: Lesson plans

Sometimes the start of the lesson is driven by the need of whoever turns up. Sometimes it is driven by what happened previously. Sometimes it is driven by what I am currently interested in.

In all cases, exactly who turns up will potentially change what is taught.

Equally, there may be a starting theme, but what that leads to depends on who is in the class and what they do. On the occasions where I have tried repeating a class that worked well (in terms of sequence of techniques etc), the lack of spontaneity and reaction to what is happening tends to make it turn out less well...

That said, I have a duty to prepare people for exams and to cover areas of weakness, thus can't just ignore totally areas of the syllabus.

YMMV
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Old 08-15-2013, 05:04 PM   #4
Michael Hackett
Dojo: Kenshinkan Dojo (Aikido of North County) Vista, CA
Location: Oceanside, California
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 1,121
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Re: Lesson plans

Arjan, one technique I've seen done with a wide-ranging group of students is to divide the class. Have the lower ranking students work on their specific level techniques with a senior student and have the senior students work on more advanced material. Have the seniors take turns leading the juniors and then finish the class with all students combined to work on something appropriate for all. You will have to be on roller skates to keep track of everyone since they are training at the same time and you will have to move from junior to senior students and back to teach a technique and then supervise.

Michael
"Leave the gun. Bring the cannoli."
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