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Old 06-01-2002, 07:28 PM   #1
Jessica
Join Date: Dec 2001
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Titles

When speaking to/of someone who is reasonably high ranked, when do you use "______ Sensei" and when do you use "Sensei ______"
Thanks
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Old 06-02-2002, 12:03 AM   #2
akiy
 
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In the Japanese language, titles and other designations such as "sensei," "san/chan," "hakase," "roshi," and so on are used after the name.

It seems some Western folks place such in front of the name (in the same manner of "Mister Smith"). To my Japanese ears, though, calling someone "Sensei Smith" sounds weird...

-- Jun

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Old 06-02-2002, 01:24 PM   #3
Don_Modesto
Dojo: Messores Sensei (Largo, Fl.)
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Quote:
Originally posted by akiy
To my Japanese ears, though, calling someone "Sensei Smith" sounds weird...
To my American ears, too.

Don J. Modesto
St. Petersburg, Florida
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Old 06-02-2002, 01:44 PM   #4
Chuck Clark
 
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I agree with you guys.

I think if you're gonna use the Japanese language in the context of a Japanese cultural art, you should do it appropriately.

Regards,

Chuck Clark
Jiyushinkai Aikibudo
www.jiyushinkai.org
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Old 06-06-2002, 09:41 AM   #5
akiy
 
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However, I will say that non-Japanese people calling me "Jun san" and such over here in America bugs me a bit. It seems out of context to me, especially in the English language. Maybe it's just my reaction to meeting people who were "more Japanese than the Japanese" in the past, though...

-- Jun

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Old 06-06-2002, 09:47 AM   #6
Greg Jennings
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When I complained to my instructor about the students calling me "sensei" or "sempai", he said "Well, at least they're not calling you "Peckerhead"!".

Best Regards,

Greg Jennings
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Old 06-06-2002, 09:48 AM   #7
erikmenzel
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chuck Clark
I think if you're gonna use the Japanese language in the context of a Japanese cultural art, you should do it appropriately.
Maybe it is also wise to try not to be more japanese than the japanese!

Erik Jurrien Menzel
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Old 06-06-2002, 10:06 AM   #8
Chuck Clark
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by erikknoops

Maybe it is also wise to try not to be more japanese than the japanese!
Of course you're right!

Lots of people do get a bit carried away with trying to be Japanese at some point in their practice. I was guilty as a young teenager and then when I actually spent time there I realized it was impossible.

Appropriateness is the word, I think. As Jun said above about people calling him Jun san when all the rest of the conversation is in English seems a bit off. However, there is a "technical language" that is used in the practice of budo and if you choose to use it, it should be done properly in my opinion. (I'm not claiming to be correct all the time either!!)

Regards,

Chuck Clark
Jiyushinkai Aikibudo
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Old 06-06-2002, 01:09 PM   #9
Don_Modesto
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Quote:
Originally posted by akiy
However, I will say that non-Japanese people calling me "Jun san" and such over here in America bugs me a bit. It seems out of context to me, especially in the English language. Maybe it's just my reaction to meeting people who were "more Japanese than the Japanese" in the past, though...-- Jun
There was a fellow who used to bring his college karate club to our dojo every year when I did that art as a kid. He was a senior ranked American and he spoke broken English during training, but got fluent again during poker.

I suffer (enjoy) my own secret (sick) glee inflicting on unsuspecting (any) Japanese I meet here (Florida) the same expectant questions I had to suffer for 17 years in Japan: "You're Japanese?! Oh! Can you use chopsticks? Can you eat natto?"

Don J. Modesto
St. Petersburg, Florida
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Old 06-06-2002, 03:43 PM   #10
guest1234
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Quote:
Originally posted by Greg Jennings
When I complained to my instructor about the students calling me "sensei" or "sempai", he said "Well, at least they're not calling you "Peckerhead"!".

Best Regards,
Well, you never know...

I'm sure this wouldn't apply to you, but there have been some seniors in my place, who, after they announce to a new student that they are 'sempai' and wander off, and the student asks me what 'sempai' means, well, the temptation will someday be more than I can resist.
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