Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-02-2002, 03:03 PM   #1
Beverly
Dojo: San Diego Aikikai
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 3
Offline
Question Advice for Someone New

I have just started Aikido (I've been to 4 classes so far) and trying to get used to it all. I'm having a good time, the people at my dojo are great, and the challenge is fun but I have one question:

How does one remember it all from simply watching? Well, I guess I have two questions: Does learning this way eventually get easier?

I think in some ways I can be a quick learner, but I find that I have a problem remembering a technique that was just demonstrated (or shown to me) in class. Perhaps I am just nervous? Also, since all of these moves are foreign to me, I was hoping that once I start remembering certain moves, that learning new ones would be easier?!

Okay, okay I do have one more question:

Are there any books or videos out there that would be good for a new person, like me, to become familiar with certain beginner's techniques?

I really want to stick with Aikido and excel in it and if there is anything I can do out of class to help me become a better student in class, I will do it! Any advice is appreciated! Thanks for reading this!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 03:13 PM   #2
akiy
 
akiy's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 5,987
Offline
Re: Advice for Someone New

Quote:
Originally posted by Beverly
How does one remember it all from simply watching? Well, I guess I have two questions: Does learning this way eventually get easier?
The answer to your second question, I'd say, is "yes."

The answer to your first question is that once you start recognizing some of the techniques, you'll start to pick up "new" techniques more easily.

Things to look for in a technique include the basic footwork (irimi, tenkan), the basic "direction" of your footwork (omote, ura), where your hands go, and your posture.

With all of that said, my thought that "just watching" won't make your aikido much better; it's the "doing" part which will.

Quote:
Are there any books or videos out there that would be good for a new person, like me, to become familiar with certain beginner's techniques?
If I remember correctly, your dojo has tapes to help people for their kyu exams. Try asking Hugo at the front desk...

-- Jun

Please help support AikiWeb -- become an AikiWeb Contributing Member!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 03:27 PM   #3
Kat.C
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 212
Offline
Hello Beverly,
I am just a beginner too, less than three months of training so far and this is exactly what I wondered when I first started (still do sometimes ) I have a very hard time remembering what sensei is demonstrating no matter how many times he goes through the technique, but it is getting easier. It helps that I know what tenkan, irimi and tenshi are, that way I just have to remember which movement I have to do rather than study senseis feet and remember 'right foot back,spin 180 degrees' etc. Of course sometimes when trying to do the technique I can't remember if it's tenkan or tenshi or what! I actually find that I don't learn from watching at all, I just get a general idea of what it shuld look like, I really learn from doing it as it is my body that must remember the technique. I do practice going over techniques in my head as well though when I can't physically practice them. This is getting to be a long post and I don't think I've said much that's helpful. Basically as I get more familiar with moving the way one does in aikido I find it a little easier to learn the techniques by watching and doing. I am still having problems though, aikido is very confusing,at least for me. My sensei said that usually after about six months it is alot less confusing. Anyways I hope this helps you a little.

Kat

I find the aquisition of knowledge to be relatively easy, it is the application that is so difficult.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 04:24 PM   #4
Beverly
Dojo: San Diego Aikikai
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 3
Offline
Tapes

Quote:
If I remember correctly, your dojo has tapes to help people for their kyu exams. Try asking Hugo at the front desk...
Jun,

Yes, that's right, my dojo does sell kyu exam tapes (all demonstrated by Chiba Sensei ). I think it starts at the 5th kyu exam, but it would be a good idea to pick them up to study.

Quote:
It helps that I know what tenkan, irimi and tenshi are, that way I just have to remember which movement I have to do rather than study senseis feet and remember 'right foot back,spin 180 degrees' etc.
Kathryn,
It would be a good idea for me to do the same, sometimes I try to observe everything and trying to remember where my feet go and what my hands do is impossible because I am trying to remember too much. If I knew the different movements then I could just concentrate on piecing them all together. Thanks, it's great advice!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 04:32 PM   #5
erminio
 
erminio's Avatar
Location: Milano
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 28
Offline
Remembering the moves

Hi, I'm starting Aikido and I guess I'll have the same problem; in a bookstore I found
"Aikido and the dynamic sphere" by Ratti and Westbrook: I think I'm going to use its drawns and description to put the moves in my mind and practicing at home, after the classes.

Hope I helped you

Have a good day

Erminio
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 04:53 PM   #6
Kensai
Location: South West UK
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 216
Offline
Learning
I have been learning Martial arts for many years. But have been going to Aikido for a very short time.

i) Picking things up will get easier as you notice common patterns in the moves. Or the moves are an extension of say for example "ki" exercises.

ii) dont let your mind wonder.

iii) I find it helps looking at the hands and the one point of my sensei. This is where most of the technique comes from.

iv) Arm yourself with good books so that you know what the moves are atleast called before the lesson.

v) Never listen to anyone else other than your Sensei, even if these other people are trying to help. Your Sensei is Sensei for a good reason.

vi) ENJOY!

Have fun

Cheers

Chris

"Minimum Effort, Maximum Effciency."
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 05:40 PM   #7
AikiAlf
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 47
Offline
Smile

relax, listen to all people and do what the teacher did, not what you think he did
don't sweat it no one is going to ask you to demontrate techniques before you feel much better about this situation.
train regularly and soon you won't remember what it feels to have to think about your feet and hands all the time, and what comes next. Eventually it will become natural.
this insn't insta-MA. don't expect to master it in a year. Relax.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 07:32 PM   #8
PeterR
 
PeterR's Avatar
Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 3,318
Japan
Offline
In the beginning stay away from books and tapes not specifically recomended by your teacher. It confuses things.

Far better to just go to the dojo and let the natural learning method take place.

First six months are the worst because everything is new - why add to the confusion.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 08:08 PM   #9
jk
Location: Indonesia
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 245
Offline
Hi Beverly,

I'd stay away from the books and tapes for the present, because the most use you'll get out of them is as review material.

That being said, I don't think getting Chiba Sensei's 5th and 4th kyu tapes would be a bad idea...great stuff. Based on the opinions of those I respect, you're quite lucky to be training where you are. I'd love a chance to train at your dojo.

Regards,
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2002, 08:56 PM   #10
MaylandL
Location: Western Australia
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 241
Offline
Re: Advice for Someone New

Hello Beverly.

Welcome to the forum and aikido.

Quote:
Originally posted by Beverly
How does one remember it all from simply watching? Well, I guess I have two questions: Does learning this way eventually get easier?
I cant really add to what's been said in terms of specific advice. Hopefully I can add some words of encouragement.

I guess if you've ever taken up a new sport or activity that requires manual skills and dexterity you would be in the same position. It will feel "clunky" in the beginning but things will become more familiar if you keep up with the training.

When you are learning something new it will be awkward in the beginning but it gets easier with time and regular practice. Also in aikido you never stop learning, there's so much to explore and try out.

Quote:
Originally posted by Beverly

Are there any books or videos out there that would be good for a new person, like me, to become familiar with certain beginner's techniques?
I agree with Mr Peter Rehse's comments. Train regularly, ask lots of questions of your Sensei and Sempais and above all have fun and enjoy the experience of learning something new.

All the best for your training.

Mayland
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2002, 07:18 AM   #11
Genex
 
Genex's Avatar
Dojo: Warrington Seishin Kai
Location: Warrington, England
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 155
Offline
Hi
I'm reasonable new too been doind it over a month, basicaly i watch when the move is performed and then when we pair up we attempt to figure it out *communication* is the key if your not sure watch some of the advanced pupils i'm sure if your having major difficulties your sensei will notice (prolly cause you havent hit the mat at 100+ Mph yet)
if in doubt ask, you'll pick it up tho its hard not too just think about the kewl things you can do to ppl, i guarentee you'll get more airtime then an RAF pilot.
pete

like having your brains smashed out by a slice of lemon wrapped round a large gold brick. - The hitchhikers guide to the galaxy on the Pan-galactic Gargleblaster!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2002, 11:15 PM   #12
Gopher Boy
Dojo: Takemusu Aiki Sydney City Dojo
Location: Australia
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 36
Offline
Hi Beverly!

(Hi Mayland!)


I agree wholeheartedly with Chris - you do start to recognise certain patterns after a while. As a new(er) student, I am at the point where things are starting to make sense and sit in my mind.

To ease any fears - yes, this does make things easier to learn. Sorry, let me re-phrase that.... It makes it easier to perform the technique in a such a way as for it look perfect to you and abysmal to Sensei

You will find as you progress, that so much of Aikido is based on a few fundamentals. Practise in Aikido is very much like kata in something like karate. It is to get a grounding in the basics. Once you start to recognise different movements, postures and feelings (pain is usually prominent!) then you will find that learning will be easier.

As for out-of-class exercises and ways to improve, practise is of course the most important. Different exercises help different people but one I find to help me immensely is just a plain, simple verticle cut of the bokken. If you are keen then ask at the dojo on places to get a good one and then talk to Sensei about the correct way to cut. Go home, find a nice open space (outdoors is good!) and cut away. You will find that the arms get quite sore early on. Continue as long as you can and then stop. Don't cut when your arms are too sore or you technique will become sloppy and you wont gain any benefit. Wash, rinse, repeat....

Another thing I found helpful was to simply miss a lesson. True, it was due to a badly sprained ankle, but it still made a lot of difference. Sometimes you need to forget the technique and actually do it. Most techniques in Aikido employ natural motions of the body and so quite often your body will know what to do even if you don't! HOWEVER - skipping lessons is not to be done regularly or even occasionally. It all depends on how you learn though. If you find that perserverance always gets you there then go for it. If you need to take a small step back then do it.


Hope you continue to have a great time!

Phill.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2002, 12:38 AM   #13
Duarh
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 117
Offline
About skipping lessons

A somewhat strange experience. . .for the second time in my year-long aikido 'career', I was forced by my health to take a month or so off from practice. And, for the second time, I noticed a notable improvement in my aikido abilities right after a hiatus. . .this latter time it was because I finally forced myself to relax during class, but that was something I couldn't do when I was going to class every second day. It is strange how this happens. . .

It's not as if I'm going to take months off now to magically 'improve' my technique, though ;D

and yeah, everything in aikido certainly seemed immensely confusing to me in the very beginning, and grew swiftly less so as time passed - learning became much easier (of course, I'm still confused, but. . .it's a different kind of confusion)
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2002, 08:59 AM   #14
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Location: Florida Gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,878
United_States
Offline
IMHO, don't wory about remembering. Just train in what your Sensei gives you that day. It comes to you after a while. There are far too many variations and combinations to keep up. Just train. Relax, breath, and enjoyu yourself.

Until again,

Lynn

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2002, 02:46 PM   #15
Beverly
Dojo: San Diego Aikikai
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 3
Offline
Smile Thanks for all the replies

I'd like to thank all of those who replied to my message. The advice and encouragement is greatly appreciated. This is only my second week at my dojo (which I am VERY honored to be a member of) and it has been... a challenge, but I am very excited about and very humbled by all there is to learn. I'm planning on sticking to it for the long run (as you all have said it's a continual learning process) but I'm glad to know that it will some day get easier. I have also heard that after about 6 months things start to fall in place/make sense. So any worries I have about learning are premature. But even that being said, I'm sure this will not be my last post here.

Beverly
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2002, 04:17 AM   #16
Petroff
Location: Sofia
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1
Offline
I myself am a complete beginner in Aikido (having started 3 weeks ago) and I feel pretty much the same. Despite being very enthusiastic and finding it extremely interesting I seem to have a great difficulty understanding and remembering even the simplest movements. And because I am the only complete beginner in my group I used to think that the problem lies in me and that somehow I am not very suitable for Aikido. Everybody tried to persuade me that this situation is very normal for the first few months and afterwards all of a sudden things become a lot more clearer. Sensei says that all I need is practice. I am not entirely convinced, but certainly hope that it's true :-)
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2002, 10:03 AM   #17
Duarh
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 117
Offline
Ivan - it's true

Btw, it's taken me a year, not 6 months, for things to suddenly become a LOT clearer (and more misty at the same time) so don't worry. (this doesn't mean that you won't understand more after 6 months than now - quite to the contrary)
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advice from your sensei. dps General 6 06-01-2006 10:35 PM
Uchi Deshi advice Daphne General 12 07-09-2005 10:20 PM
Dojos in N. Japan - need advice! Adam Garrison General 4 08-27-2003 10:13 AM
Advice to 10+ years self Paula Lydon Training 4 03-21-2003 06:29 PM
Looking for Advice on Conducting Seminar Session MaylandL General 6 09-21-2002 10:04 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:48 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2017 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2017 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate