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Old 02-15-2011, 01:18 PM   #51
sakumeikan
Dojo: Sakumeikan N.E. Aikkai .Newcastle upon Tyne.
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
Some are more concerned with the future of their revenue stream.

dps
Maybe the class register could be renamed the cash register?Some teachers are not motivated by money but I have known gentlemen who might be classed as Breadheads.
Cheers, Joe
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Old 02-15-2011, 01:34 PM   #52
dps
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
My version of protecting my revenue stream is making darn sure that absolutely nothing happens to my wife, Genie, since she's the one with the real job.
Dittos George, except my wife is not named Genie.

dps
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Old 02-15-2011, 01:44 PM   #53
Cady Goldfield
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Matthew Story wrote: View Post
I don't necessarily disagree with you, but isn't there a danger of losing aikido altogether if we take our flexibility too far? It seems that every year the definition of the word aikido grows more and more vague. Where is the line between being informed by our martial arts relatives and disappearing into them?
What if the skills being offered by some of these people "outside of aikido" are actual skills that Ueshiba O-Sensei had and used to forge his personal vision of his aikido? What if you, as aikidoka, thus had access to the same means by which Ueshiba was enabled to create -his- aikido?

Wouldn't that mean that you would be bringing -your- aikido even closer to, not farther from, the model provided by O-Sensei?
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Old 02-15-2011, 03:42 PM   #54
Mark Freeman
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
What if the skills being offered by some of these people "outside of aikido" are actual skills that Ueshiba O-Sensei had and used to forge his personal vision of his aikido? What if you, as aikidoka, thus had access to the same means by which Ueshiba was enabled to create -his- aikido?

Wouldn't that mean that you would be bringing -your- aikido even closer to, not farther from, the model provided by O-Sensei?
Hi Cady,

that's some pretty hefty what if's.

How do we know if the skills that those outside of aikido are offering are the same skills that Ueshiba had?

I am not aiming to disparage those with skill, I'm just posing the question. If someone here has practiced with both Ueshiba and those with skills outside of aikido and can say they are the same, then great, we have at least that persons subjective benchmark.

I personally have met Mike and will soon meet Dan. I really enjoyed my experience with Mike and I'm optimistic that I will enjoy my experience with Dan. Have these guys got what Ueshiba had? I have no way of knowing. Has my own teacher got what Ueshiba had? Again I have no idea, I do know from experience that he certainly has what I am striving for or I wouldn't still be with him. I also know that neither Mike, Dan, or any other person with skill from outside of aikido, can give me the depth of knowledge and experience of aikido that my own teacher has. Do I need to go out and look to these guys to make my aikido more like Ueshiba, again I am unsure that there is a definite answer to this.

My experience with Mike did not give me any new skills as such, it did however give me a way of viewing what I already do with a very logical and rational language. As well as some exercises that were completely complimentary to what I am already teaching. This in turn has informed the way I describe to my own students what it is that I am doing. This in turn has helped me understand what my own teacher is doing. So, it was well worth the time cost and effort to meet him.

I'm hoping my experience with Dan will be just as beneficial if not more so, we'll see.

Am I closer to Ueshiba's aikido? I don't know, I'm certainly one step closer to my own

Some good questions to pose though.

regards

Mark

Success is having what you want. Happiness is wanting what you have.
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Old 02-15-2011, 04:07 PM   #55
Hellis
Dojo: Ellis Schools of Traditional Aikido
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Re: Future of Aikido

Mark Freeman

"" Am I closer to Ueshiba's aikido? I don't know, I'm certainly one step closer to my own ""

Mark

Believe me, as a student of Sensei Ken Williams you are as near to O Sensei as you can get..

Henry Ellis
http://aikido-books.blogspot.com/
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Old 02-15-2011, 04:37 PM   #56
Mark Freeman
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Henry Ellis wrote: View Post
Mark Freeman

"" Am I closer to Ueshiba's aikido? I don't know, I'm certainly one step closer to my own ""

Mark

Believe me, as a student of Sensei Ken Williams you are as near to O Sensei as you can get..

Henry Ellis
http://aikido-books.blogspot.com/
Deep Bow

Henry,

that is a deeply moving thing for me to hear you say.

Thank you, with great respect and appreciation.

Regards,

Mark

Success is having what you want. Happiness is wanting what you have.
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:04 AM   #57
AsimHanif
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Re: Future of Aikido

"You want my measuring stick? When was the last time a karate guy came into your dojo to learn better karate? Or a judo guy."

Jon, I've had boxers come in while our aikido class was in session and express interest in learning.One in particular said to me "its in the hips right?', which I thought was pretty astute. I think most realize the efficiency of movement and like how they perceive power generated. But I don't think any of them (boxers) like the 'falling' part:-)

Again I think its a matter of 'you'. It took me probably 10 yrs to realize what I actually wanted out of aikido, although from day 1, I felt there was something about the art I was already getting.
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:57 AM   #58
Ketsan
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Jon Reading wrote: View Post
Consipracy time. Since this thread is taken a different turn...

I think the undercurrent of the exploration of aikido outside aikido is one of fear. What happens to our ethos when a karate guy can better explain "aiki"? Or a kung fu guy that can better explain the role of dominant and recessive pressure? or the Systema guy that can better explain relaxation? Voiced or not, I think we all have a bit of trepidation, if not concern, that these things may be true. Trouble is, these scenarios are becoming more common - these people are getting better and pushing aikido into the sidelines. We have a great opportunity to recover and learn from these people.

The future of aikido is similar. We see more, better, people who are challenging the aikido people. Our principles are being challenged and quite frankly, many of us are not prepared to handle those people. Our principles are faltering under pressure (i.e. they are not working). But how many principles do we have? How many different interpretations do we have? Heck, we cannot even agree on the definition of "ki".

What do we do with these people who attack our principles or challenge our betterment? Marginalize. Ostracize. Ridicule. We need to understand the number of people better then us is increasing, while the number of us better then them is decreasing. We hide behind our ethics and our morals and our stance that aikido is not about fighting. But on some level isn't that just avoiding the fact a young athletic male who has some wrestling experience can hand us our lunch? We got some elitism going on and now the common folk are better at what we do than we are... We need to shape up.

We need stewards of aikido who are interested in the future of aikido. Some of the instructors of whom I am aware are doing these things and their aikido (and their explanations of aikido principle) are improving. At one point in time other arts came to aikido seeking knowledge. You want my measuring stick? When was the last time a karate guy came into your dojo to learn better karate? Or a judo guy? It's been about 2 months since I asked a judo guy to make my aikido better... I am looking forward to the day a judo guy comes into my dojo asking to make his judo better.

I am making some gross statements here to outline a point and I aim to cast a blanket statement across aikido but realize there are people doing these things... and it shows.
That's a good post.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:48 AM   #59
graham christian
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Re: Future of Aikido

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Alex Lawrence wrote: View Post
That's a good post.
I'll second that.

I've had many different people from other arts come to learn, Is that so unusual?

Regards.G.
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Old 02-16-2011, 10:50 AM   #60
CitoMaramba
 
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Re: Future of Aikido

In our dojo we have a couple of karateka who regularly train in our aikido classes. One of them, a yudansha in karate, said that aikido training has led him to a deeper appreciation of the bunkai in karate kata.

Inocencio Maramba, MD, MSc
Dangayan Singkaw Aikido Shinzui
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Old 02-16-2011, 11:30 AM   #61
kewms
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Inocencio Maramba wrote: View Post
In our dojo we have a couple of karateka who regularly train in our aikido classes. One of them, a yudansha in karate, said that aikido training has led him to a deeper appreciation of the bunkai in karate kata.
I think we may have found at least the beginning of a definition of "good aikido:" aikido that attracts people from other martial arts.

Katherine
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Old 02-16-2011, 01:19 PM   #62
Mark Freeman
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Katherine Derbyshire wrote: View Post
I think we may have found at least the beginning of a definition of "good aikido:" aikido that attracts people from other martial arts.

Katherine
Hi Katherine,

I can't see how that that would be an accurate measure.

You could have someone quietly practicing good aikido in their own place in their own way. Not advertising or inviting the other arts, just doing what they do for it's own sake.

You could have someone practicing average aikido but with a much better sense of outward looking and networking, they could easily attract folk from other arts through their enthusiasm to engage.

by your measure above, the average aikido would be good, and the good would not be rated at all.

I have had students who are ex judo, jujitsu and karate, but that is no measure of whether my aikido is good.

For me if you can execute technique without effort, with full centre to centre connection, with extension and intent, and with dare I say it 'a joyful feeling' then it's 'good' aikido. If all of those things are not in place then it is 'looks like' aikido but actually isn't.

regards

Mark

Success is having what you want. Happiness is wanting what you have.
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Old 02-17-2011, 12:33 AM   #63
Benjamin Mehner
Dojo: Salt Lake Aikikai, Zen Bu Kan
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Jon Reading wrote: View Post
Consipracy time. Since this thread is taken a different turn...

I think the undercurrent of the exploration of aikido outside aikido is one of fear. What happens to our ethos when a karate guy can better explain "aiki"? Or a kung fu guy that can better explain the role of dominant and recessive pressure? or the Systema guy that can better explain relaxation? Voiced or not, I think we all have a bit of trepidation, if not concern, that these things may be true. Trouble is, these scenarios are becoming more common - these people are getting better and pushing aikido into the sidelines. We have a great opportunity to recover and learn from these people.

The future of aikido is similar. We see more, better, people who are challenging the aikido people. Our principles are being challenged and quite frankly, many of us are not prepared to handle those people. Our principles are faltering under pressure (i.e. they are not working). But how many principles do we have? How many different interpretations do we have? Heck, we cannot even agree on the definition of "ki".

What do we do with these people who attack our principles or challenge our betterment? Marginalize. Ostracize. Ridicule. We need to understand the number of people better then us is increasing, while the number of us better then them is decreasing. We hide behind our ethics and our morals and our stance that aikido is not about fighting. But on some level isn't that just avoiding the fact a young athletic male who has some wrestling experience can hand us our lunch? We got some elitism going on and now the common folk are better at what we do than we are... We need to shape up.

We need stewards of aikido who are interested in the future of aikido. Some of the instructors of whom I am aware are doing these things and their aikido (and their explanations of aikido principle) are improving. At one point in time other arts came to aikido seeking knowledge. You want my measuring stick? When was the last time a karate guy came into your dojo to learn better karate? Or a judo guy? It's been about 2 months since I asked a judo guy to make my aikido better... I am looking forward to the day a judo guy comes into my dojo asking to make his judo better.

I am making some gross statements here to outline a point and I aim to cast a blanket statement across aikido but realize there are people doing these things... and it shows.
There is a difference between being a group of pajama wearing hippies and following the Budo Path.

This is a martial art and I feel that so many of us have ceased treating it as such.

I've been in competitive martial arts before and I know some of the Aikidoka in my dojo couldn't hold up in those competitions. That's not to say I'm a great fighter myself. I know the feeling of facing someone who really knows his stuff and losing to him. Most of my Sempai have never studied another martial art and have probably never experienced that despair themselves.

This means that, unlike I, they have probably never been faced with a real win/lose fight situation. I've spent plenty of time sparring and have been in a few fist fights. Mostly with my old man. He was a Golden Gloves Boxer in his day, so it wasn't exactly a cake walk, but I "won" most of the time if you can call beating your own father winning.

I think that all the shame of kicking my own father's ass is what lead me to a more peaceful path after he died (from type 1 diabetes complications).

I've heard Buddhists say that each life is precious and irreplaceable. I am a Zen Buddhist and I say that each moment is precious and irreplaceable. There is no past and the future is not yet written. There is only the now. Enjoy it and act accordingly.

Let silence be my mantra.
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Old 02-17-2011, 06:55 AM   #64
jonreading
 
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Re: Future of Aikido

I am a firm believer that the measure of a man (or woman) is made by the quality of his (or her) friends. My point was that my aikido is usually judged...by me. And according to me, I am a... (fill in the blank). I think it a boon when my aikido is observed by, and commented on, as being of quality by those people whom I respect to be honest, good, martial arts people.
A few years back ASU started applying some pressure to our sandans, yondans and godans (and some nidans) to be present in front of Sensei more. Summer camp, winter camp, etc. Why? So Sensei could see what they were up to, how they looked. Probably some political reasons too. Aikido Bridge seminars are the same. These venues are where other people who are quality martial artists can check out what aikido is up to and who is doing good things in aikido.

I think Mark touched on something that I have seen also... Attracting poor students from another martial art isn't necessarily a good thing. I believe the "hobbyest" aikido mentality has invited a number of people from other arts because the "bar" was lower in aikido than what they were doing... That is different than a quality student soliciting advice to make their primary art better. Or, a quality student transitioning into aikido from a primary art as a continuation of serious training. The exposure to other arts and validation of aikido by a larger community is an important metric that we sometimes shy away from.

Last edited by jonreading : 02-17-2011 at 06:59 AM.
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Old 02-17-2011, 08:18 AM   #65
Mary Eastland
 
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Re: Future of Aikido

Comparing ourselves to others is just a distraction from becoming as good as we can be.
Mary
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Old 02-17-2011, 08:51 AM   #66
Anjisan
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Ai symbol Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Jon Reading wrote: View Post
I am a firm believer that the measure of a man (or woman) is made by the quality of his (or her) friends. My point was that my aikido is usually judged...by me. And according to me, I am a... (fill in the blank). I think it a boon when my aikido is observed by, and commented on, as being of quality by those people whom I respect to be honest, good, martial arts people.
A few years back ASU started applying some pressure to our sandans, yondans and godans (and some nidans) to be present in front of Sensei more. Summer camp, winter camp, etc. Why? So Sensei could see what they were up to, how they looked. Probably some political reasons too. Aikido Bridge seminars are the same. These venues are where other people who are quality martial artists can check out what aikido is up to and who is doing good things in aikido.

I think Mark touched on something that I have seen also... Attracting poor students from another martial art isn't necessarily a good thing. I believe the "hobbyest" aikido mentality has invited a number of people from other arts because the "bar" was lower in aikido than what they were doing... That is different than a quality student soliciting advice to make their primary art better. Or, a quality student transitioning into aikido from a primary art as a continuation of serious training. The exposure to other arts and validation of aikido by a larger community is an important metric that we sometimes shy away from.
I agree with what you are saying and I appreciate you putting it so consicly. It would seem that martial effectiveness is also a good metric to judge Aikido by as well. However, those who state that it is primarily only about personal development can then dodge that metric. Perhaps there a perception out there that for the sake of inclusiveness that Aikido has to lower the bar, otherwise Aikido may die out.
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Old 02-17-2011, 09:27 AM   #67
Mark Freeman
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Jason Rudolph wrote: View Post
I agree with what you are saying and I appreciate you putting it so consicly. It would seem that martial effectiveness is also a good metric to judge Aikido by as well. However, those who state that it is primarily only about personal development can then dodge that metric. Perhaps there a perception out there that for the sake of inclusiveness that Aikido has to lower the bar, otherwise Aikido may die out.
Hi Jason,

I don't see Aikido dying out anytime soon, well hopefully not anyway.

I think if someone is practicing for personal development with little focus on martial effectiveness and they get what they are after from aikido practice, then good. It has served them well. If they are under no illusions that what they are doing will not be much use in a 'real' situation, then where is the problem for them?

Maybe it is possible to learn martially effective aikido with little or no focus on personal development, great if that is what you want, but you may just end up as a more effective fighting person with little or no personal morals or integrity

Martial effectiveness is only one measure, it was not, as far as I read it O Sensei's vision for aikido to become the ultimate 'martial' art. It is a much bigger art than that.

There are plenty of arts out there to teach effective fighting.

Aikido should be appreciated precisely for its ability to be inclusive.
Why not have an art that is great for kids to practice, great for old people to practice, great for those with disabilities to practice. As well as great for young fit men and women to practice ( I love the young fit blokes - cannon fodder for me )

There is a philosophy embedded in the movements and the principles of aikido, everyone can benefit from understanding them.

Martial effectiveness alone is a measure, admittedly, but a limiting one.

regards,

Mark

Success is having what you want. Happiness is wanting what you have.
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Old 02-17-2011, 09:28 AM   #68
Diana Frese
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Re: Future of Aikido

Here is some personal experience on some of the topics that have been brought up in this thread. First of all, I'd like to say that my husband and I are fascinated to read about Ron and Mary, their dojo and their background, even if we never get to build our own it is still inspiring to know about them and what they are doing.

Our marriage grew out of a cultural exchange down at the local Y. In fact one of my first students Edie had studied jiu-jitsu in town, but the class ended. She wanted to make sure I would be around to teach in the future before she "put her heart into Aikido" as she had put her heart into jiu-jitsu. This was in 1975 and I called my six week class "Introduction to Aikido."

Another student, Eric, was her husband's student in kung fu. The kung fu teacher was Hungarian and had traveled in Asia on business. So right there were people from other martial arts interested in Aikido, just as soon as I got back from Japan. They just learned whatever was taught and I was glad they kept up interest. Edie didn't stay, because she wasn't sure what my future would be, I wasn't sure either, it was just my home town I had returned to.

Eric stayed, and about five years later introduced me to a friend from his informal kung fu class with Edie's husband. So he was actually our "nakodo" his friend Chuck is the same Chuck I later married. Chuck tried Aikido and comes back to it from time to time.
But I ended up studying Shotokan with his friends in NY and later he started teaching at our friend Ray's dojo in the neighboring town Norwalk.

Many years have passed, but I just wanted to say that such cultural exchanges do strengthen the martial arts if people sincerely want to learn from each other. In my case I needed extra work on speed and balance as I got older. In my own classes, which were two hours long at the Stamford Y, I had devoted time to what I called, respectfully "Nureyev lessons" because I felt it was important to get one's own balance before practicing with partners.
These were whatever footwork exercises I had picked up from teachers and senpais.

I feel that we look for what we need and I'm happy to have been validated by so many on studying different arts, short term or long term.

By the way, about martial effectiveness, another member of that kung fu class was attacked by two people at once and what happened is the aikido technique from the couple of classes at the Y he had attended just happened effortlessly ---- it worked just like in the photographs in the books. Of course he was a natural for martial arts, had been a high school wrestling champ, studied kung fu, trained with his brother on throwing techniques. He was exceptional, but it is worth notice that the Aikido technique was what happened when he was attacked.
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Old 02-17-2011, 10:05 AM   #69
DH
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Mary Eastland wrote: View Post
Comparing ourselves to others is just a distraction from becoming as good as we can be.
Mary
Thats ridiculous.
We all learned what we know from someone else, from mimicing and patterning movement, then growing and deepening. If we are using ourselves as a pattern and examplar of excellence than sure...we will be all we can be...whatever that is. I think I would say...ouch!

Good grief, if Ueshiba thought that way there would be no AIkido to begin with. He got what he got by learning everything from someone else, then adding to it, changing it, personalizing it, what have you. How many times did he ask for Koryu teachers, send people to koryu teachers, he went out to play in Judo dojos. Ever changing, ever growing.
Virtually all of his peers from Daito ryu...every one of them, stated they grew past their initial understanding of aiki and never stopped searching and experimenting. Do you think they made all those discoveries....on their own???
The key to success is usually in embracing others ideas and, letting them challenge yours and comparing the outcomes.
Looking at what others are doing and comparing it to ourselves spurs change and growth and prevents stagnation..
Closing your mind and thinking you have all the information and or even knowing the best methods to learn something is the first step on the path to decline. Examining...failing.. then re-examining, absorbing and experimenting is the first step on the path to genius

I think this time...right now, is a nexus in the path of Aikido. I think it is going to be defining and inescapable, I know senior teachers in the art who are out there right now experimenting and coming back and stating that their recent exposure is changing their aikido forever. In the fullness of time people are going to refer back to the openness and sharing of this time period (and also to certain key people) as a significant change in the art of Aikido. It will be interesting to see who those people are going to be. I don't think anyone knows just yet, but its going to interesting, thats for sure.
Cheers
Dan

Last edited by DH : 02-17-2011 at 10:20 AM.
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Old 02-17-2011, 10:18 AM   #70
CitoMaramba
 
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Re: Future of Aikido

Nishio Sensei wrote in the preface to his book, "Yurusu Budo":
Quote:

I often tell people who come to train with me my view that the value of a budo is determined through comparison with other budo; even if you're superficially mastered techniques like ikkyo and nikyo, these are pointless unless you can make them work in the context of other budo. Judo, kendo and karate all have their own stong points and we must study these too. Budo techniques are not permanent and unchanging; if other things change, then naturally budo change in response. What does not change, of course, is the spirit of aikido as it was taught to us by the Founder.

Inocencio Maramba, MD, MSc
Dangayan Singkaw Aikido Shinzui
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Old 02-17-2011, 10:31 AM   #71
carina reinhardt
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Re: Future of Aikido

Maybe somebody will interest the opinon of Christian Tissier about this topic http://www.christiantissier.com/arti...a-20100519.pdf
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Old 02-17-2011, 10:41 AM   #72
AsimHanif
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Mary Eastland wrote: View Post
Comparing ourselves to others is just a distraction from becoming as good as we can be.
Mary
I agree Mary. I certainly try to learn from others, take what is useful to me, keep what may be useful to others I teach but I certainly don't waste my time comaring myself to others. We all have different strengths and weaknesses. I try to focus on being the best I can be (self competition).
I would not say your statement is ridiculous at all.
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Old 02-17-2011, 11:19 AM   #73
Diana Frese
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Re: Future of Aikido

Replying to Asim, Carina and Mark thanks so much.

Carina, I read with interest the Christian Tissier article and will study it. He is a great and dedicated Aikidoka I met him in Japan and he had beautiful Aikido and was very kind to all. Some people just don't care for the no touch aspect but I respect Watanabe Sensei and the fact that Christian Tissier explained that was the particular path that Watanabe Sensei chose to pursue. So for myself I will try to find the more recent video if I can find one that will play, the 2006 one would not. It has got me curious. If my friends and I try the techniques, will they eventually turn into no touch throws? I'd better get back to practice. Just do the techniques and see what happens. No transpo to get to the local dojo at the moment, much less to get to Japan.

We do what we can wherever we are. So thanks Mark, I am an older person now and have some old injuries (not from Aikido, probably) You posted while I was still writing, and I was glad to read that you emphasized the inclusiveness of Aikido. It's in Second Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba 's book The Spirit of Aikido too.

And thank you Asim, that summarizes how I feel and gives me confidence for the future.
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Old 02-17-2011, 11:35 AM   #74
carina reinhardt
Join Date: Oct 2005
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Spain
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Re: Future of Aikido

I were looking for the number of aikidokas in Spain to put something in this thread, but I could't find anything, instead I found this interview of Ch. Tissier. But I just saw the new thread of Jun Number of Currently Active Aikido Practitioners? , what a coincidence !, so I sent an email to someone of the Federation and as soon as I'll get the reply, I'll tell Jun.
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Old 02-17-2011, 11:39 AM   #75
Ketsan
Dojo: Zanshin Kai
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Re: Future of Aikido

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Thats ridiculous.
We all learned what we know from someone else, from mimicing and patterning movement, then growing and deepening. If we are using ourselves as a pattern and examplar of excellence than sure...we will be all we can be...whatever that is. I think I would say...ouch!

Good grief, if Ueshiba thought that way there would be no AIkido to begin with. He got what he got by learning everything from someone else, then adding to it, changing it, personalizing it, what have you. How many times did he ask for Koryu teachers, send people to koryu teachers, he went out to play in Judo dojos. Ever changing, ever growing.
Virtually all of his peers from Daito ryu...every one of them, stated they grew past their initial understanding of aiki and never stopped searching and experimenting. Do you think they made all those discoveries....on their own???
The key to success is usually in embracing others ideas and, letting them challenge yours and comparing the outcomes.
Looking at what others are doing and comparing it to ourselves spurs change and growth and prevents stagnation..
Closing your mind and thinking you have all the information and or even knowing the best methods to learn something is the first step on the path to decline. Examining...failing.. then re-examining, absorbing and experimenting is the first step on the path to genius

I think this time...right now, is a nexus in the path of Aikido. I think it is going to be defining and inescapable, I know senior teachers in the art who are out there right now experimenting and coming back and stating that their recent exposure is changing their aikido forever. In the fullness of time people are going to refer back to the openness and sharing of this time period (and also to certain key people) as a significant change in the art of Aikido. It will be interesting to see who those people are going to be. I don't think anyone knows just yet, but its going to interesting, thats for sure.
Cheers
Dan
Amen
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