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Old 10-12-2010, 10:23 AM   #51
mathewjgano
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Carl Rylander wrote: View Post
What do people think of the Dalai Lama's recent statement that sleep was a good way of meditating?
Was he talking about lucid dreaming? In which case I think that's one of the best times to meditate! A real off-mat (ideally ) time saver.


Also: what Josh said! I wish I were so eloquent.
Take care folks!

Last edited by mathewjgano : 10-12-2010 at 10:30 AM.

Gambarimashyo!
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Old 10-12-2010, 10:53 AM   #52
jonreading
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
Niall Matthews wrote it in another thread and I agree with him.
Aikido is a way of life.
1. I would probably argue that very few of us actually incorporate aikido as a way of life. Usually, its something like a way of life 2-3 times a week and maybe during flashing points of introspection during the week. However, do not discount incorporating aikido into your life as a goal, which you occasionally achieve.

2. I think also we run the risk of assuming that aikido is a substitute for the other training that we need in our lives. Look through the various thread archives for numerous references to substitute fixes from PTSD to rape counseling to human resources. Aikido is not the appropriate substitute for proper situational training, it is a tool which allows us to better educate and execute our lives.

I believe aikido helps us to better control our bodies, our emotions, our minds, and our surroundings. I don't know if that constitutes a way of life, but it certainly improves our quality of life.
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Old 10-12-2010, 11:27 AM   #53
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Jon, has summed up very well my personal thoughts on this thread as I read through them. Not that I disagree with things others have said, there is alot of good material.

A couple of things come to mind from my past experiences (and present right now as I am actively in a combat zone...not that that really matters much in the greater scheme of this discussion, nor does it make me an expert on this topic...but this has been a topic that is fresh on my mind).

1. Martial Arts or Aikido will make you "better" prepared. IME, sure, do a degree that logic is true, however, it can also make you "worse".

Studied for 12 years or so in traditional systems, then started met some guys in the Army that did not share the same paradigm of training than I did. The dissonance I experienced left me in utter defeat in the fetal position trying to figure out what I did wrong or why I could not beat a guy that had only been studying "martial arts" for 4 months.

Why? what I had studied had simply not prepared me to deal with the paradigm of more realistic fighting as I had thought it had. Sure I could have been more calm or understood maybe a slight bit better than someone that had not studied as long as I had, but given the two of us...the results would have been the same....fetal position on the floor getting pounded..but yet...sure...I might have been a little more a "one" with myself...but does that really matter if I am injured or dead?

Macroscopically, as far as a "budo" practice, I think maybe it might make a difference as a "life changing" practice. Maybe I am more at peace with myself and all is right with my life, family and friends, so I am prepared to "die a good death".

Maybe, as Josh pointed out, that it does allow us to think clearer and maybe we are less a "sheep" and more a "wolf". that is we are willing to take action vice not take action. I think that can be an important first step.

Our slogan in Army Combatives is "the definition of a warrior is one who is willing to close with and engage the enemy."

Note that we don't say "competent" to engage the enemy.

there is alot more to being Competent in the necessary skill sets to do "something about" an immediate action situation. As Josh points out, EMT, Police, Military...a Chef even.

So, I think that, do a degree, yes, Budo practices can (or should), instill an basic instinct of "willingness".

But, I think that Willingness is one thing and ability/skill quite another.

Also, we may think or rationalize that our training has prepared us in ways that it really has not. How much stress do we really train under in our daily lives to deal with highly stressful and potentially dangerous situations? From my experiences, most dojos do not prepare students in the least do deal with the horrors of violence or catastrophe.

2. We will always rise and fall to the level of our training. I have experienced this so much in my military career. Under stress, we will do the things that we have made habit. Things we don't even realize we may do. Sometimes good, sometimes bad.

I train my guys in the basics, then I get them in Blauer gear as fast as I can and then put them under a great deal of "combative" stress and video tape them so they can see the "instinctive" baseline that they currently have. We then work to fix and reprogram those things and then go back into the stress training to make sure it "sticks".

We also do the same things with our weapons on the range introducing as much stress and as many variables as we can to closely approximate the conditions we will fight under. It is amazing how "stupid" and brain locked you become and then result to subconscious defaults!

Sorry to get so long winded.

Anyway, I think budo training can help in many areas of our lives, however, when you start looking at actual applications or it in our daily lives, the dojo is in my opinion much like Church. A great practice to remind us constantly about what we need to stay focused on...however, like going to Church on Sunday....it ain't reality, and applying our values and the lessons we learn in Church are a whole heck of alot harder to make a part of our daily lives, and requires a whole lot more than what we typically get in a couple of hours in the dojo a week.

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Old 10-12-2010, 11:43 AM   #54
Michael Neal
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

The Church analogy is perfect, so true. I feel so warm and fuzzy after Church until 10 minutes later and someone cuts me off in traffic and I start screaming and cussing, oops back to Church.
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Old 10-12-2010, 11:44 AM   #55
Carsten Möllering
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
... she didn't say "my aikido" ... she said "real aikido".
So you understood this as pejorative/devaluating?

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
On budo as a michi: IMO, life is the michi, budo is a tool (a useful one, but not the only one, not the best for all the tasks) for walking it.
I think we should not confuse the map (budo) with the territory (life).
Thank you! This is very interesting to me and helps to understand you. And I think it marks some important points.

Because if one understand aikido as dao, it is indeed the michi wich structures life. It is not just the tool but the walk itself (~ the "way" of the life / ~ a way of living ones life).

@ Mary
In consequence job, familiy ... will gather round the practice of aikido. I becomes kind of a center of life.

I truely don't assume that everyone has to live aikido this way.
But it can be done this way.

(Don't you know persons (eg aikido teachers) who live it this way?)

Carsten
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Old 10-12-2010, 04:02 PM   #56
Demetrio Cereijo
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Carsten Möllering wrote: View Post
Because if one understand aikido as dao, it is indeed the michi wich structures life. It is not just the tool but the walk itself
Well, I think life has structure on its own and is a path worth walking in itself.

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Old 10-12-2010, 06:44 PM   #57
Johann Baptista
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
I also don't have any trouble standing up to those who engage in new-age bullying of the "if you don't agree with me, then it's because you don't get it, and if you don't get it, it's because you lack aiki" sort. So I'm going to keep on pointing out this gap whenever someone pretends it doesn't exist.
I have a question: What is your definition of New Age? And why do you (and so many others) seem to use this term constantly to describe anyone who enjoys thinking about Aikido philosophy/spirituality?

My guess is that "New Age", along with words like "Aiki-bunny" are simply pejorative terms used to dismiss the opinions of a group of people as unimportant and worthless. In itself it is a form of bullying, a form that is becoming more and more common on Aikiweb.

How many times has a person posted about the importance of Love in Aikido only to be shot down by scores of "realists"? What happened to the person who earlier posted about Aikido giving his life more meaning? I'll tell you: He was given a rather ugly "people cling to all kinds of delusions" type of response. Are we chasing people from Aikido instead of helping them? Maybe we are. Maybe we should begin to respect the hopes and dreams of others; it is in their visions that the action emerges. Maybe, just maybe, we might be wrong after all.

Perhaps I'm going on too much, but I really think it will benefit others to read this. It remains my humble opinion, an opinion, which like all opinions, is occasionally right.

It is sad that an increasing number of people are regarding Aikido philosophy as unimportant. Philosophy is the backbone of Aikido. It is the theory that drives the movements. Although it may sound nice to say "Its not the theory, its the practice", Aikido is really a fusion of the two. With the proper theory, practice becomes more productive. How would you propose to blend with another person if you never thought about what blending means?

There are many excellent books on Aikido; what are they? Collections of theories. Theories, I may add, that have greatly influenced my practice and my life.

BTW, for someone who believes that "we should discard the theory", you seem to spend a lot of time on Aikiweb. Just saying.

Regarding all this theory, I should probably go practice now. Just to balance out, you know?

Last edited by Johann Baptista : 10-12-2010 at 06:49 PM.
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Old 10-12-2010, 07:01 PM   #58
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Spirituality is all good but Aikido is also a martial art. While self improvement can be an important aspect, if the martial aspect is missing or lacking then why even bother with the techniques? There are probably much easier ways to practice spirituality if that is one's sole focus.

The problem is that the entire art gets a bad reputation and people flock to other martial arts instead, especially the people who have good physical ability. The result is a continued downhill spiral of effective transmission of Aikido as a martial art.

I used to be really negative towards the spirituality and such but I think it is great so long as the rest of the art isn't moved out of the way or diminished.

I find the same problem with Judo in the opposite direction, too much sport with Kano's ideal of mutual welfare and benefit moved out of the way for win at all costs, as well as the diminishing of kata and other important aspects of the art.

It seems to me Japanese martial arts are dissolving like the Tower of Babel.
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Old 10-12-2010, 07:22 PM   #59
Gorgeous George
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

http://www.aikidoonline.com/articles...ba_Shoshin.php

http://aikidoonline.com/articles/shi...o_Training.php
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Old 10-12-2010, 08:28 PM   #60
jonreading
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Johann Baptista wrote: View Post
I have a question: What is your definition of New Age? And why do you (and so many others) seem to use this term constantly to describe anyone who enjoys thinking about Aikido philosophy/spirituality?

My guess is that "New Age", along with words like "Aiki-bunny" are simply pejorative terms used to dismiss the opinions of a group of people as unimportant and worthless. In itself it is a form of bullying, a form that is becoming more and more common on Aikiweb.
What the heck, I'll bite.

I think the issue at hand is not the expression of philosophy in aikido, it is the poor expression of a philosophical understanding of aikido. You have a right to think whatever aikido thoughts you want to think, but once you start asserting those thoughts and expressing them to others you assume the liability of those thoughts.

I think a big problem with the expounding of philosophy is that the proponent neither expected to present a cohesive and concise explanation, nor prepared to refute counter-arguments. Secondly, there is a new manner of interpretation that grants a wide berth to the [recognized] application of aikido philosophy. Both of these conditions are both liberal and younger in generational acceptance and for this reason I can understand "new-age" as a general descriptor of an expression. I don't consider "new-age" to be a derogatory term any more than "hippie" or "yuppie."

My rhetoric professor once used a sports analogy to identify the meat of an argument:
If you assert the claim "Nolan Ryan is the best pitcher that ever played baseball," you better present facts and logic to support your claim. If you think Nolan Ryan is the best pitcher that ever played baseball you have no argument.
BTW, Nolan Ryan is the best pitcher ever.
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Old 10-12-2010, 10:01 PM   #61
lbb
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Carsten Möllering wrote: View Post
So you understood this as pejorative/devaluating?
Oh, heck no. I took it with a big grain of salt. I mean, we all project our world view to a degree.

Quote:
Carsten Möllering wrote: View Post
@ Mary
In consequence job, familiy ... will gather round the practice of aikido. I becomes kind of a center of life.

I truely don't assume that everyone has to live aikido this way.
But it can be done this way.

(Don't you know persons (eg aikido teachers) who live it this way?)

Carsten
Sure! I know people who have placed their aikido practice at the center of their lives. They have made choices and directed their lives in such a way that aikido is paramount -- and not in some hypothetical manner, but teaching and training full-time, living hand to mouth to do so, sacrificing the pastimes and often the relationships that are part of life for most of us.

But I also know many aikido practitioners who don't
live this way, and that includes many aikido teachers. My senseis (they're married) have three children and two full-time jobs. They most definitely have lives outside the dojo. We've never had this conversation, and for all I know, they might say that aikido was the "center of life" for them. On the other hand, having witnessed their devotion to their family, I can't imagine that their family would occupy any place other than the center of their lives.

If you say that something, anything, is the "center" of your life, isn't that the same as saying that all other things are peripheral? And if so, doesn't that (at least potentially) dishonor some pretty important things?

I guess for myself I would say that the center of life is life. It's the whole thing, all things and no thing. It isn't anything particular -- even something as broadly defined as "aikido" is too particular for me.
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Old 10-12-2010, 10:04 PM   #62
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Johann Baptista wrote: View Post
I have a question: What is your definition of New Age? And why do you (and so many others) seem to use this term constantly to describe anyone who enjoys thinking about Aikido philosophy/spirituality?
I don't use it often and I don't use it in that sense. I used it in this specific context to make the point that bullying behavior can garb itself in rainbows and smiles, and that bully clubs come with many labels on them -- "spiritual" most definitely being one.
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:47 AM   #63
carina reinhardt
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Johann Baptista wrote: View Post
I have a question: What is your definition of New Age? And why do you (and so many others) seem to use this term constantly to describe anyone who enjoys thinking about Aikido philosophy/spirituality?

My guess is that "New Age", along with words like "Aiki-bunny" are simply pejorative terms used to dismiss the opinions of a group of people as unimportant and worthless. In itself it is a form of bullying, a form that is becoming more and more common on Aikiweb.

How many times has a person posted about the importance of Love in Aikido only to be shot down by scores of "realists"? What happened to the person who earlier posted about Aikido giving his life more meaning? I'll tell you: He was given a rather ugly "people cling to all kinds of delusions" type of response. Are we chasing people from Aikido instead of helping them? Maybe we are. Maybe we should begin to respect the hopes and dreams of others; it is in their visions that the action emerges. Maybe, just maybe, we might be wrong after all.

Perhaps I'm going on too much, but I really think it will benefit others to read this. It remains my humble opinion, an opinion, which like all opinions, is occasionally right.

It is sad that an increasing number of people are regarding Aikido philosophy as unimportant. Philosophy is the backbone of Aikido. It is the theory that drives the movements. Although it may sound nice to say "Its not the theory, its the practice", Aikido is really a fusion of the two. With the proper theory, practice becomes more productive. How would you propose to blend with another person if you never thought about what blending means?

There are many excellent books on Aikido; what are they? Collections of theories. Theories, I may add, that have greatly influenced my practice and my life.

BTW, for someone who believes that "we should discard the theory", you seem to spend a lot of time on Aikiweb. Just saying.

Regarding all this theory, I should probably go practice now. Just to balance out, you know?
I agree completely, you wrote my own thoughts reading all the negative posts, but due my lack of vocabulary I could not express myself as you did, thanks
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:54 AM   #64
Nicholas Eschenbruch
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Wow, a thread I was initially a bit cynical about turned into a really interesting exchange, I wonder how that reflects on me... But thanks everybody!

A teacher once asked a group I was in whether we could imagine life without aikido, and what we would do. I said I could, and that I would put the time to good use, learn to play the guitar, catch up on all the movie classics I missed, and do all sorts of things that I could not do because of time spent on the mat. The teacher accepted that, but said he could not imagine life without Aikido. Then I read an interview with another high ranking teacher who said that after thirty plus years doing aikido he sometimes felt it was maybe time to do something else. These were both professionals. I have often asked myself how both points of view reflect on aikido as a way of life.

As for "real" aikido, not sure what that is...

Johann, I call myself an aikibunny whenever I can. I just like it when people find out I am 6'4'', my atemis hurt and I dont mind hard practice. I agree that cynicism is strong on aikiweb at times, but then I find it can be useful to check fantasies for their reality content. As in this thread.

The New Age though is history, isn't it? Wasn't that in the early eighties? Fritjof Capra? Aquarius? I my god...

Last edited by Nicholas Eschenbruch : 10-13-2010 at 12:58 AM.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:29 AM   #65
Demetrio Cereijo
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Johann Baptista wrote: View Post
I have a question: What is your definition of New Age?
If you don't mind, mine is saying Paulo Coelho is awesome and Kant... is a cigarette brand, isn't it?

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Old 10-13-2010, 05:02 AM   #66
Carsten Möllering
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Johann Baptista wrote: View Post
How many times has a person posted about the importance of Love in Aikido only to be shot down by scores of "realists"?
Problem is:
The of the word "love" in the context of budo differs from the meaning of the word "love" used in the context of most modern western interpretations.
So there is not really a contradiction between seeing aikido as budo of love and learning waza which destroyes the joints of an attacker.
But often the use of the words "love" and "harmony" implies the modern western understanding of love which denies that aikido is a effectiv martial art.

Quote:
It is sad that an increasing number of people are regarding Aikido philosophy as unimportant. Philosophy is the backbone of Aikido.
Problem here:
To what philosophy of aikido do you refer?
The only philosophy which is originally given with aikido is shinto. And more precisely the way of Oomoto kyo.
I know only very few people who follow this way and it truely is not the usual way of understanding aikido in most dojo.

Other pilosophies are self-made and differ from teacher to teacher, from dojo to dojo. I've never heard a sensei or shihan teaching with the thought of "aikido is love".
The connex of all of the practioners ist waza. Not philosophy.

Quote:
It is the theory that drives the movements
Not in the style I learn. There is no talking / teaching about the theory. It's just the research of movements.

Quote:
Although it may sound nice to say "Its not the theory, its the practice", Aikido is really a fusion of the two.
It would be nice if you could formulate "my aikido is" or "aikido can be". The way I practice and not only me but our dojo, our sensei, shihan, federation ... is another way.
And we do so, because we think this is the way that reveals most the benefits of aikido.

Quote:
With the proper theory, practice becomes more productive.
This sounds like what I hear of German ki-aikidoka (Yoshigasaki sensei). And their practice is poor.

Quote:
How would you propose to blend with another person if you never thought about what blending means?
Learning by doing: A view back in history teaches the method of aiki was developped through practice.

Quote:
There are many excellent books on Aikido; what are they? Collections of theories.
Could you understand them as reflection of practice?

Quote:
BTW, for someone who believes that "we should discard the theory", you seem to spend a lot of time on Aikiweb. Just saying.
Exchange of experiences or historical issues is not the same as "theory" I think.
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Old 10-13-2010, 07:19 AM   #67
Carsten Möllering
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
I know people who have placed their aikido practice at the center of their lives. They have made choices and directed their lives in such a way that aikido is paramount [
Ok.
Can you imagine people making aikido center of their life and also doing a fulltime job? Do you think this is possible or does this collide with your understanding of "center of life" or "fulltime job"?

Quote:
living hand to mouth to do so
Can you imagine people making aikido center of their life and not living hand to mouth? (But living a life with good income?)

Quote:
sacrificing the pastimes and often the relationships
Yes. There's very little time then.

Quote:
... that are part of life for most of us.
Most of whom?

Quote:
... they might say that aikido was the "center of life" for them. On the other hand, having witnessed their devotion to their family, ...
Would be the same with me. But: I know that there a lot of conflicts. You simply can't be with your children or your wife when practicing. So, how to decide if such conflicts evolve?

Quote:
If you say that something, anything, is the "center" of your life, isn't that the same as saying that all other things are peripheral? And if so, doesn't that (at least potentially) dishonor some pretty important things?
No. It just means to have certain viewpoint, standingpoint, focus ...
And it's your / or better my point of view. This doesn't dishonor the world view of other people.

Quote:
I guess for myself I would say that the center of life is life. It's the whole thing, all things and no thing. It isn't anything particular
I think do it's a way of life / to live life / the whole thing /everyday ... by committing to one particular. Like aikido. I think this exactly is the meaning of "do": Living the whole by concentrating and commiting to only one special.

Last edited by Carsten Möllering : 10-13-2010 at 07:22 AM.
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:01 AM   #68
niall
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

I think it's time to change the dynamics of this discussion.

1. A new member in her enthusiasm tried to share her vision of what aikido meant to her.

2. The original title of the thread is actually completely innocuous. It's difficult to see how any sentient person could disagree with it. Whether you are doing aikido to help your job as a bouncer or you are looking for unity with the universe it's all going to happen outside the few hours a week you spend in the dojo.

3. There were some negative comments. Mostly poorly argued and using pejorative language like pontificate. Like some other threads on aikiweb they were demonstrations of how little even some aikido people understand a.harmony or b.respect when they are discussing things on the internet. Anyone disagreeing with the original post could have said "I don't agree with you and this is why." Some people were happy to put the person down.

4. So I am now posting detailed examples of teachers from the Aikikai, Yoshinkan and Ki Society all demonstrating that these teachers believe that there is a spiritual dimension to aikido and that it is a practice that extends beyond the dojo. I found these examples easily in a few minutes on the internet. If you open almost any book on aikido you will find similar ideas and that is not a coincidence.

I am putting them as an extra post in my blog because there are several of them and there is a time limit for editing posts in the forums.

http://www.aikiweb.com/blogs/moon-in...tual-yep-4038/

If you want to disagree with the thesis of this thread I would appreciate it if you would also use evidence. Putting someone down when you don't agree with them just doesn't cut it with adults.

we can make our minds so like still water, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life
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Old 10-14-2010, 06:17 AM   #69
Makochan
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

If Aikido for me began and ended in the Dojo or if Aikido did not give me a sense of purpose beyond the normalities of everyday life, I would give up training today. I am surprised to read some of the negative comments and saddened to see how limited Aikido is for some. Willi, when I trained at Minato Aikikai for over ten years the Aikido was much more than simply training in the dojo. From that time I forged many lifelong and treasured friendships and knowing Akasaka Sensei and Nagai Sensei as I do, I find it strange that you do not understand what Carina, Niall and Matthew. For me; my Aikido gave me the guiding principles that define the person I have become. Live and let live please!!
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Old 10-14-2010, 07:30 AM   #70
WilliB
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

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William McAuley wrote: View Post
If Aikido for me began and ended in the Dojo or if Aikido did not give me a sense of purpose beyond the normalities of everyday life, I would give up training today. I am surprised to read some of the negative comments and saddened to see how limited Aikido is for some. Willi, when I trained at Minato Aikikai for over ten years the Aikido was much more than simply training in the dojo. From that time I forged many lifelong and treasured friendships and knowing Akasaka Sensei and Nagai Sensei as I do, I find it strange that you do not understand what Carina, Niall and Matthew.
Huh? Why do you drag me into this? I only made a short off-hand remark at the beginning of the thread. I did not opine one way or the other.

If you must know, I think it is up to you what you make of it... if you want to meditate endlessly about deep spiritual meaning or simply do exercise -- your choice entirely. Live and let live.

Leave me out of this trench war, please!
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Old 10-14-2010, 07:43 AM   #71
Don_Modesto
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Facebook is definitely making me lazy...

@Mary Malmros & Marc Abrams--Like button clicked.

LOL.

Don J. Modesto
St. Petersburg, Florida
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http://www.theaikidodojo.com/
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Old 10-14-2010, 09:42 AM   #72
NagaBaba
 
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

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Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
Jon, has summed up very well my personal thoughts on this thread as I read through them. Not that I disagree with things others have said, there is alot of good material.

A couple of things come to mind from my past experiences (and present right now as I am actively in a combat zone...not that that really matters much in the greater scheme of this discussion, nor does it make me an expert on this topic...but this has been a topic that is fresh on my mind).

1. Martial Arts or Aikido will make you "better" prepared. IME, sure, do a degree that logic is true, however, it can also make you "worse".

Studied for 12 years or so in traditional systems, then started met some guys in the Army that did not share the same paradigm of training than I did. The dissonance I experienced left me in utter defeat in the fetal position trying to figure out what I did wrong or why I could not beat a guy that had only been studying "martial arts" for 4 months.

Why? what I had studied had simply not prepared me to deal with the paradigm of more realistic fighting as I had thought it had. Sure I could have been more calm or understood maybe a slight bit better than someone that had not studied as long as I had, but given the two of us...the results would have been the same....fetal position on the floor getting pounded..but yet...sure...I might have been a little more a "one" with myself...but does that really matter if I am injured or dead?

Macroscopically, as far as a "budo" practice, I think maybe it might make a difference as a "life changing" practice. Maybe I am more at peace with myself and all is right with my life, family and friends, so I am prepared to "die a good death".

Maybe, as Josh pointed out, that it does allow us to think clearer and maybe we are less a "sheep" and more a "wolf". that is we are willing to take action vice not take action. I think that can be an important first step.

Our slogan in Army Combatives is "the definition of a warrior is one who is willing to close with and engage the enemy."

Note that we don't say "competent" to engage the enemy.

there is alot more to being Competent in the necessary skill sets to do "something about" an immediate action situation. As Josh points out, EMT, Police, Military...a Chef even.

So, I think that, do a degree, yes, Budo practices can (or should), instill an basic instinct of "willingness".

But, I think that Willingness is one thing and ability/skill quite another.

Also, we may think or rationalize that our training has prepared us in ways that it really has not. How much stress do we really train under in our daily lives to deal with highly stressful and potentially dangerous situations? From my experiences, most dojos do not prepare students in the least do deal with the horrors of violence or catastrophe.

2. We will always rise and fall to the level of our training. I have experienced this so much in my military career. Under stress, we will do the things that we have made habit. Things we don't even realize we may do. Sometimes good, sometimes bad.

I train my guys in the basics, then I get them in Blauer gear as fast as I can and then put them under a great deal of "combative" stress and video tape them so they can see the "instinctive" baseline that they currently have. We then work to fix and reprogram those things and then go back into the stress training to make sure it "sticks".

We also do the same things with our weapons on the range introducing as much stress and as many variables as we can to closely approximate the conditions we will fight under. It is amazing how "stupid" and brain locked you become and then result to subconscious defaults!

Sorry to get so long winded.

Anyway, I think budo training can help in many areas of our lives, however, when you start looking at actual applications or it in our daily lives, the dojo is in my opinion much like Church. A great practice to remind us constantly about what we need to stay focused on...however, like going to Church on Sunday....it ain't reality, and applying our values and the lessons we learn in Church are a whole heck of alot harder to make a part of our daily lives, and requires a whole lot more than what we typically get in a couple of hours in the dojo a week.
This is one of the most interesting post I read recently. However ppl who are living in this McDonaldcivilisation don't understand a word what are you talking about.
Thanks and come back save.

Nagababa

ask for divine protection Ame no Murakumo Kuki Samuhara no Ryuo
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Old 10-27-2010, 07:58 AM   #73
Lyle Bogin
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Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

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Marc Abrams wrote: View Post
I prefer to practice fantasy, non-organic, politically incorrect Aikido in my sleep on the sixth Sunday of every month outside of the dojo .

Marc Abrams
Lol! Sempai, you crack me up!

"The martial arts progress from the complex to the simple."
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