Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-11-2010, 12:43 PM   #26
Demetrio Cereijo
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,913
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
Demetrio pls translate
You have to find the answer by your own means. Walk the way. No spoonfeeding.

  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 12:49 PM   #27
Marc Abrams
Dojo: Aikido Arts of Shin Budo Kai/ Bedford Hills, New York
Location: New York
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,302
United_States
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Carina:

Have you ever considered that the phrase "real Aikido" is a loaded one that can mean a lot of nothing. I think that it is safe to assume that you had never met with, or trained with the founder of Aikido. At best, your interpretation of what "real Aikido" means is simply your own - based of course upon your own life experiences, teachers, .....

You pontificate from what position in assuming what people understand or not understand of Aikido? Aikido can mean many things to many people. It should be safe to assume that you are in no position of knowledge or authority to talk about what people know or don't know about Aikido.

I am happy that your practice of Aikido has been a positive transformational process for you. Many people, myself included, would also describe that as being a positive aspect of Aikido. That being said, I don't try and tell people what "real Aikido" is or is not to other people. At the end of the day, Aikido is a Japanese martial art. Many of us have listened to a variety of psycho-babble, new-age nonsense, ....... to people whose execution (or lack thereof) of this art is as best, lacking. These people are typically the one's who wax poetic with wonderful statements. Maybe you would be better off talking about what Aikido is to you, rather than trying to pontificate as to what it should be for others.

Just my 2 cents.

Marc Abrams
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 12:55 PM   #28
carina reinhardt
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 428
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Marc Abrams wrote: View Post
Carina:

Have you ever considered that the phrase "real Aikido" is a loaded one that can mean a lot of nothing. I think that it is safe to assume that you had never met with, or trained with the founder of Aikido. At best, your interpretation of what "real Aikido" means is simply your own - based of course upon your own life experiences, teachers, .....

You pontificate from what position in assuming what people understand or not understand of Aikido? Aikido can mean many things to many people. It should be safe to assume that you are in no position of knowledge or authority to talk about what people know or don't know about Aikido.

I am happy that your practice of Aikido has been a positive transformational process for you. Many people, myself included, would also describe that as being a positive aspect of Aikido. That being said, I don't try and tell people what "real Aikido" is or is not to other people. At the end of the day, Aikido is a Japanese martial art. Many of us have listened to a variety of psycho-babble, new-age nonsense, ....... to people whose execution (or lack thereof) of this art is as best, lacking. These people are typically the one's who wax poetic with wonderful statements. Maybe you would be better off talking about what Aikido is to you, rather than trying to pontificate as to what it should be for others.

Just my 2 cents.

Marc Abrams
Your are right Marc, it is only my feeling, I don't know what the founder felt as real aikido. I' m sorry if I sounded that way...

And Demetrio you are not playing fair, I don't understand kanjis...
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 01:07 PM   #29
Gorgeous George
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 464
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

There might be those who go to aikido classes, practice being relaxed, having good posture, not resisting, and moving naturally - and then as soon as they leave, they become tense, slouch, and confrontational; thus completely undermining everything they did at class.
This is counter-productive - why should such a person bother training? Surely they should participate in an activity that fits in with their general attitude/disposition?

So it is quite easy for me to understand when people say that they are always practicing/training in aikido: it just means to me that they try to stay relaxed; have a good posture; and not be confrontational, or tense up when something stands in their way.
General principles make a system what it is - aikido is no different, and the martial techniques are only one way of expressing the principles of aikido.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 01:12 PM   #30
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,113
United_States
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
...which implies to me that all ways of life are subservient to individual way of life.
Sorry, should be, "...all codified ways of life..."


also, what Graham said.

Last edited by mathewjgano : 10-11-2010 at 01:15 PM.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 01:13 PM   #31
Demetrio Cereijo
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,913
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
And Demetrio you are not playing fair
In budo, like in real life, there is not fair play. Fair play is for sport.

Quote:
I don't understand kanjis...
Nor me.

  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 01:23 PM   #32
carina reinhardt
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 428
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
In budo, like in real life, there is not fair play. Fair play is for sport.
right..

And don't worry I won't fall asleep
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 01:36 PM   #33
niall
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
niall's Avatar
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 394
Japan
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

If a fire starts in my house hopefully I'll be able to make the right decisions to get my family to safety. Without panicking and without becoming tense (as Graham said). And aikido will have helped. Staying centred, breathing deeply and slowly, and staying relaxed but alert in any emergency. That's all stuff I get from aikido. It's kind of funny that people think it wouldn't help.

we can make our minds so like still water, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life
w b yeats


aikiweb blog|wordpress blog
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 01:42 PM   #34
Demetrio Cereijo
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,913
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Niall Matthews wrote: View Post
If a fire starts in my house hopefully I'll be able to make the right decisions to get my family to safety. Without panicking and without becoming tense (as Graham said). And aikido will have helped. Staying centred, breathing deeply and slowly, and staying relaxed but alert in any emergency. That's all stuff I get from aikido. It's kind of funny that people think it wouldn't help.
I had various courses with real fire (under professional fire dept members supervision) for that. Silly me.

  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 02:08 PM   #35
Gorgeous George
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 464
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
I had various courses with real fire (under professional fire dept members supervision) for that. Silly me.
...yeah: fuck you Niall! How dare you suggest that your life-long devotion to remaining calm might help in a stresful situation - your very suggestion explicitly states that if you have done specific courses about what to do in such situations then you are wrong, because aikido is the only way! How dare you!!!1!!
If a fire ever happens, youse a dead man Niall!

Hahahahahaha.

Last edited by Gorgeous George : 10-11-2010 at 02:14 PM. Reason: Missed something...that needed removing: poor grammar etc.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 02:11 PM   #36
carina reinhardt
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 428
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
I had various courses with real fire (under professional fire dept members supervision) for that. Silly me.
Are for all people here the 警策?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 02:16 PM   #37
Josh Reyer
 
Josh Reyer's Avatar
Location: Aichi-ken, Nagoya-shi
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 644
Japan
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
I had various courses with real fire (under professional fire dept members supervision) for that. Silly me.
Do you have courses for every possible event that might befall?

In social psychology (research psychology, that is; the hard stuff, not the psycho-analysis), there is a term: the bystander effect. It describes the tendency of people not to respond to some of emergency, or render aid to an ailing person, when there are many other people present.

I learned of this when I studied psychology in college, and assumed that having armed myself with knowledge, I would not fall prey to the kind of mental autopilot that kicks in and causes the bystander effect.

A couple years later, I was in a library in Toyota City, sitting at a table and reading. I heard a crash from my left, turned, and saw that a little boy, maybe 2 or 3 years old was falling down an escalator. An up escalator. He was falling from step-to-step, but because it was going up, he wasn't falling down, nor was it happening at the expected pace. It would look like he'd landed on one step and stop, and just when you thought it was over he would, almost in slow motion, roll and fall to the next step.

Immediately I stood up, determined to do something. At that very same moment, a woman behind me also stood up. And we canceled each other out. She thought I'd do something; I thought she'd do something, and we both froze, stupidly, like statues. Eventually (it seemed like hours, but it was probably 1 or 2 seconds) one of the library staff ran over and stopped the escalator, while the boy's negligent mother ran up the escalator to get her boy.

Naturally, when it was over, I was shaken, sick to my stomach, and grossly ashamed of my inability to act. I knew about the bystander effect, and I still let it take me.

So, I train. I train with the intention of learning to control my mind and body under stress, and I endeavor, like Niall, to bring what I get out of training with me out of the dojo, into everyday life. I don't train to handle possible muggers or burglars, or rough hooligans looking to make trouble. I train for earthquakes, typhoons, people collapsing in the street, old men choking on mochi, snotty kids making trouble in my class, and babies falling down up escalators. There are courses I can take; first aid and CPR, earthquake and typhoon safety, class management. But all that is word and memory based knowledge. What I train in the dojo is the ability to utilize such knowledge, under stress, unexpectedly, in any situation.

I don't know if my training will help me if another such unusual event. And there are other paths; I could have joined the military, law enforcement, or the fire department. But I have other priorities that make those impractical, so I chose to train in budo. Also, because budo inherently deals with human interaction, I find it also relevant to my relationships at home and work. That's what I think of when I think of using aikido outside the dojo, in daily life. I suspect it's what Niall and Carina think of. "Aikido outside the dojo" can be fluffy, new age-y navel-gazing, or it can be as practical as you want it to be. The conscious improvement in my posture has made my clothes fit better; that's almost worth it by itself.

Josh Reyer

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne,
Th'assay so harde, so sharpe the conquerynge...
- Chaucer
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 02:24 PM   #38
carina reinhardt
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 428
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Joshua Reyer wrote: View Post
Do you have courses for every possible event that might befall?

. There are courses I can take; first aid and CPR, earthquake and typhoon safety, class management. But all that is word and memory based knowledge. What I train in the dojo is the ability to utilize such knowledge, under stress, unexpectedly, in any situation.

I don't know if my training will help me if another such unusual event. And there are other paths; I could have joined the military, law enforcement, or the fire department. But I have other priorities that make those impractical, so I chose to train in budo. Also, because budo inherently deals with human interaction, I find it also relevant to my relationships at home and work. That's what I think of when I think of using aikido outside the dojo, in daily life. I suspect it's what Niall and Carina think of. "Aikido outside the dojo" can be fluffy, new age-y navel-gazing, or it can be as practical as you want it to be. The conscious improvement in my posture has made my clothes fit better; that's almost worth it by itself.
Demetrio you can go to as much courses you like, there are only that a course during what period? a few days or weeks, if you don't practice and refresh it, you will forget it.
You cannot compare what aikido give us with any course.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 04:41 PM   #39
Demetrio Cereijo
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,913
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
Are for all people here the 警策?
I also have a 木剣

Josh, when something similar happened to me I also was shaken, sick to my stomach, but proud of my ability to act and save the life of a choking young lady. You had knowledge about bystander effect, I had training in emergencies.YMMV.

I don't know how you train but I find you (as someone with psychology studies who should know about desensitation and stress inoculation) considering aikido practise on par with firefighting/emergencies training from a stress level perspective or stress coping skills adquisition a bit strange. Not counting the technical knowledge needed to face an emergency which aikido (maybe its not your case) doesn't provide.

Being "centered" and having good posture is not going to help if you don't know what to do and how to solve the problem.

  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 04:47 PM   #40
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,803
United_States
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Niall Matthews wrote: View Post
That's all stuff I get from aikido. It's kind of funny that people think it wouldn't help.
Another strawman. Who said it wouldn't help?

I'm sorry, I still see a big gap between "can help you in other areas of your life" and "a way of life". I also don't have any trouble standing up to those who engage in new-age bullying of the "if you don't agree with me, then it's because you don't get it, and if you don't get it, it's because you lack aiki" sort. So I'm going to keep on pointing out this gap whenever someone pretends it doesn't exist.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 04:51 PM   #41
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,803
United_States
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Joshua Reyer wrote: View Post
Do you have courses for every possible event that might befall?

In social psychology (research psychology, that is; the hard stuff, not the psycho-analysis), there is a term: the bystander effect. It describes the tendency of people not to respond to some of emergency, or render aid to an ailing person, when there are many other people present.
There are many types of training that teach people not to be paralyzed in these situations. Military training, public safety training, EMS, rescue of all kinds -- all these train constantly in situations that are quite a bit more stressful than what you find at the average dojo, for all that you know it's "only a drill" (the trainers are very, very good at making it real). I think this type of ability is not only not unique to aikido, but probably taught better elsewhere than an aikido dojo.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 09:16 PM   #42
niall
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
niall's Avatar
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 394
Japan
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
Another strawman. Who said it wouldn't help?
Mary you did. I said

Aikido helps you become centred, relaxed and aware in all aspects of your life.

Which you quoted and you said, I hear it also cures male pattern baldness and bad breath, too. (well let's hope so!)

As Josh explained clearly and most people understand the composure you develop from budo training will help you outside the dojo. The techniques may or may not. Probably not. I've been doing aikido for nearly thirty years and I have used an aikido technique once (on a guy who tried to punch a woman). But I use the composure I get from my training every day.

So what are you arguing about? Carina's words that it's a way of life? She's talking about her aikido. You know nothing about it. My words are at the top of this thread: real aikido is not just for the dojo (which was advice to a guy who was being aggressive in the forums).

It's cool for you or anyone else to say they are not interested in that aspect. But don't tell me what aikido is for me. That's intellectually arrogant.

we can make our minds so like still water, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life
w b yeats


aikiweb blog|wordpress blog
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2010, 10:10 PM   #43
WilliB
Dojo: Minato Aikikai
Location: Tokyo
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 144
Japan
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Marc Abrams wrote: View Post
Carina:

Have you ever considered that the phrase "real Aikido" is a loaded one that can mean a lot of nothing.
And I thought "Real Aikido" is the trademarked invention of one Ljubomir Vracarevic, and the "first and only Serbian ultimate self-defense art". Nice coat of arms, too:

http://www.realaikido.com/Welcome.html

Gives a new twist to this ultimate thread
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 12:29 AM   #44
carina reinhardt
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 428
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
I also have a 木剣
I also have one but only use it in the dojo for training
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 12:52 AM   #45
raul rodrigo
Location: Quezon City
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 777
Philippines
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

NIce post, Niall.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 01:24 AM   #46
Josh Reyer
 
Josh Reyer's Avatar
Location: Aichi-ken, Nagoya-shi
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 644
Japan
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
Josh, when something similar happened to me I also was shaken, sick to my stomach, but proud of my ability to act and save the life of a choking young lady. You had knowledge about bystander effect, I had training in emergencies.YMMV.
My point in telling the story was not that training in emergencies is not effective, but that life can throw you crazy things. There are courses for helping choking victims; they can drill over and over the same basic commonalities of all choking victims, and even some unusual, but predictable situations. But there's no course for escalator-falling-baby-saving. One either has the wherewithal to do something or doesn't. But the falling-baby is an extreme example.

Quote:
I don't know how you train but I find you (as someone with psychology studies who should know about desensitation and stress inoculation) considering aikido practise on par with firefighting/emergencies training from a stress level perspective or stress coping skills adquisition a bit strange. Not counting the technical knowledge needed to face an emergency which aikido (maybe its not your case) doesn't provide.
I think you are making a number of unwarranted assumptions from my post. Number 1 is that I consider aikido practice "on par" with firefighting/emergencies training. I would hazard that faced with a medical/rescue emergency, a trained (and experienced) fireman or EMT would be loads better prepared than an aikidoka. And yet, I would expect a properly trained aikidoka to be better than the average Joe with no emergency training or budo training. And I daresay a fireman or EMT who properly trained in aikido might even been be better prepared than their non-training counterpart (but that is where mileage really varies). And then this all comes down to the quality of practice. I would expect any martial art that called itself martial and utilized two-man practice to be able to create an adrenaline dump greater than the average non-training man experiences in his regular day. And this is not some "budo magic" or superpower that you get from just training. You have to approach your training and your regular life from this perspective. You have to walk on to subways taking note of where the emergency door openers are, the intercoms to the driver's cab, the car fire extinguisher. You have to make note of fire exits when you go to a building. You have to try and bring your awareness on the mat to your daily life.

Assumption #2 is that I'm saying training in aikido gives you Universal Disaster skills. Nothing could be further from the truth. The idea is that proper training (and attitude off the mat) can help stave off panic, confusion, fear, or such psychological phenomena as the bystander effect or deindividuation. I train not with the expectation that I will suddenly know what to do in an emergency situation, but with the hope that I will know what I can do, and be mentally and physically prepared to execute it. Even if that's just doing what I can to allow the guys with the high-level emergency training to do their jobs, and not get in their way because I'm panicked, confused, and afraid.

Assumption #3 is that the above is all I'm talking about when I talk about budo as part of one's life off the mat. As I wrote in my previous post, there are many ways to prepare oneself to handle unexpected, high-stress, high-adrenaline, dangerous events. In addition to various emergency/military/LEO training programs, the above could probably be gained to a degree by boxing, wrestling, or fencing. But what sets budo apart from these other activities are inherent philosophical strategies for dealing with the world. That's why they are called budo -- they are michi, they are inherently meant to be ways of life. That's the very concept of michi. They contain moral and ethical precepts to guide the student to proper behavior. If I attempt to embody these precepts in my daily life, much like I do with mental and physical "readiness" mentioned above, again, the hope is that I will be able to remain calm, clear, and able to perceive the wisest course of action in a confusing and unclear world. That's the Platonic (or perhaps Gautamic) Ideal, striven for but not always reached. But then, that's why it's called a road, and not a goal.

This is what my particular budo gives to me off the mat: a healthier, freer moving body, calm in high-stress situations, a set of ethics to follow, strategies for dealing with people for mutual benefit, strength of will to do things I'd rather put off, and not to do things I shouldn't, a social circle to care for and be cared by, an opportunity to expand my understanding of Japanese language and culture, and a roadmap for living a life engaged with the world.

Sure, I could get any one of those things from some other source, and possibly to an even fuller degree. But since they are all available in the training of budo to a degree I am satisfied with, I do budo and endeavor to make it part of my life. Most of my life is spent outside the dojo, anyway; might as well get the most out of that dojo time as I can.

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
There are many types of training that teach people not to be paralyzed in these situations. Military training, public safety training, EMS, rescue of all kinds -- all these train constantly in situations that are quite a bit more stressful than what you find at the average dojo, for all that you know it's "only a drill" (the trainers are very, very good at making it real). I think this type of ability is not only not unique to aikido, but probably taught better elsewhere than an aikido dojo.
Quote:
I wrote:
I don't know if my training will help me if another such unusual event. And there are other paths; I could have joined the military, law enforcement, or the fire department. But I have other priorities that make those impractical, so I chose to train in budo. Also, because budo inherently deals with human interaction, I find it also relevant to my relationships at home and work.
I'm not sure that anyone in this thread has claimed that aikido is unique (I for one have only been using the more generalized term of "budo". Nor has anyone claimed that aikido is the best path to this, to the best of my knowledge, and I specifically mentioned the military/law enforcement/fire department as alternative paths, a statement you cut when quoting my post, but then rephrased yourself. The overall point being, aikido is a medium; it's not the message.

Last edited by Josh Reyer : 10-12-2010 at 01:27 AM.

Josh Reyer

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne,
Th'assay so harde, so sharpe the conquerynge...
- Chaucer
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 06:03 AM   #47
CarlRylander
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 129
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

What do people think of the Dalai Lama's recent statement that sleep was a good way of meditating?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 07:03 AM   #48
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,803
United_States
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Niall Matthews wrote: View Post
Mary you did. I said

Aikido helps you become centred, relaxed and aware in all aspects of your life.

Which you quoted and you said, I hear it also cures male pattern baldness and bad breath, too. (well let's hope so!)
Ok. I'm still waiting to for you to quote the part where I said that aikido training can't help you in your life off the mat.

Quote:
Niall Matthews wrote: View Post
So what are you arguing about? Carina's words that it's a way of life? She's talking about her aikido. You know nothing about it.
Others have pointed this out, so I won't belabor the point, but she didn't say "my aikido", although that may be what she meant. In her original post, she said "real aikido". Currently, you are putting words in her mouth, and in mine as well.

Quote:
Niall Matthews wrote: View Post
It's cool for you or anyone else to say they are not interested in that aspect. But don't tell me what aikido is for me. That's intellectually arrogant.
Aaaaand another strawman, as I have not done that nor anything like it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 07:26 AM   #49
niall
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
niall's Avatar
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 394
Japan
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Mary I'm not interested in arguing with you. If you have doubts talk to your teacher. If you don't well that's cool. Good luck in your training.

we can make our minds so like still water, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life
w b yeats


aikiweb blog|wordpress blog
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2010, 09:14 AM   #50
Demetrio Cereijo
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,913
Spain
Offline
Re: Real aikido is not just for the dojo

Quote:
Joshua Reyer wrote: View Post
I think you aref making a number of unwarranted assumptions from my post.
Yes, I did some unwarranted asumptions from your post. I only hope what budo is giving to you are not as unwarranted.

As you say, life can throw you crazy things and, paraphrasing Threadgill Sensei, the only accurate assumption in budo is that your assumptions are never 100% correct.

On budo as a michi: IMO, life is the michi, budo is a tool (a useful one, but not the only one, not the best for all the tasks) for walking it. I think we should not confuse the map (budo) with the territory (life).

Anyway, you're satisfied. Thats what really matters, isn't it?

  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I'm Leaving Aikido Daniel Ranger-Holt General 122 10-07-2010 08:01 PM
How I Met Aikido rulemaker General 2 06-29-2010 10:02 PM
Elusive Realism Stefan Stenudd Columns 4 09-23-2008 04:18 AM
AikiWeb Raffle for Mary Heiny Sensei akiy General 68 05-27-2008 10:37 AM
Women and Everybody Else in Aikido George S. Ledyard Teaching 113 03-16-2008 07:27 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:17 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate