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Old 01-13-2011, 10:22 AM   #1
TonyDif
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3
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Wrist Control

Greetings all

One of the facinating things I see in Aikido demos is the ability of the defender to, when grabbed by the wrists, to create pain in the attacker and control them (usually bringing them to their toes)through a slight turn of the defenders wrist. I don't know if this is a re-alignment of the attackers joints thereby locking them or pressure on a point. Any insights would be welcomed.

Regards
Tony
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Old 01-13-2011, 10:30 AM   #2
sorokod
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 595
United Kingdom
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Re: Wrist Control

To get you going, the best thing is to ask your teacher to demonstrate this on you.

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Old 01-13-2011, 10:43 AM   #3
Demetrio Cereijo
Join Date: Nov 2004
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Spain
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Re: Wrist Control

Hi Anthony,

A video where the technique you're refering to is seen would be useful.

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Old 01-13-2011, 11:03 AM   #4
Janet Rosen
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Re: Wrist Control

In general, the aim is to connect to the attacker's center and disrupt their balance; the lock is merely the way there.

Janet Rosen
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Old 01-13-2011, 11:26 AM   #5
kewms
Join Date: Aug 2002
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Re: Wrist Control

As I understand it, the locks work by creating a rigid connection through the attacker's joints to his center. Any pain is merely incidental, and depending on pain to make the lock work is unwise.

Katherine
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Old 01-13-2011, 11:27 AM   #6
Basia Halliop
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 711
Canada
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Re: Wrist Control

From the way you word the question, it sounds like you don't do aikido yourself? It's a lot easier to understand by having someone do it to you...

There are a lot of different techniques you might be talking about, but in general at least as far as I understand it so far, the most basic description I can think of of the mechanics of what you seem to be describing is usually using the arm as a lever to move the person's body, where the twisting you see is a way of locking the joints between the hand and the torso so you can create a lever arm through which to move the body and take the person off balance. Sometimes there is also pain through the force on the joints or on a pressure point, but from what I've been taught it's usually secondary.

That's pretty oversimplified (and missing out on a lot of what's going on) and coming from a relative beginner, so take it for what it's worth....
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Old 01-14-2011, 12:52 AM   #7
David Yap
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 561
Malaysia
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Re: Wrist Control

Quote:
Anthony Difilippo wrote: View Post
Greetings all

One of the facinating things I see in Aikido demos is the ability of the defender to, when grabbed by the wrists, to create pain in the attacker and control them (usually bringing them to their toes)through a slight turn of the defenders wrist. I don't know if this is a re-alignment of the attackers joints thereby locking them or pressure on a point. Any insights would be welcomed.

Regards
Tony
Tony,

Are you sure what you watched were aikido? Sound more like traditional jujitsu or shorinji kempo to me.

Regards

David Y
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Old 01-14-2011, 11:58 PM   #8
Amassus
 
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Dojo: Aikido Musubi Ryu/ Yoshin Wadokan
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New Zealand
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Re: Wrist Control

Not to be a cynic but...it could also be an overzealous uke, tanking.

Sorry guys, but it's a possibility.

Dean.

"flows like water, reflects like a mirror, and responds like an echo." Chaung-tse
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