Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Non-Aikido Martial Traditions

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-13-2010, 07:21 PM   #26
James - Huang
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

They either lean on you or don't lean on you.

If the scale went up under your feet, that means the total amount of weight coming down on your feet increased. That means someone's leaning on you, and furthermore if the pusher was standing on a scale, their weight would decrease if they started leaning. There's no way to increase OR decrease the total combined weight, so they must be leaning if you are experiencing an increase in weight.

If they are not leaning at all, then you can only use the friction reaction force.

To describe HOW to do something, you can make a list of the muscles used, and you can tell someone some visualizations to use, and what results to expect if they're doing it right.

How about you make a (correct) free body diagram in static equilibrium diagramming ALL forces acting on the center of mass of the pushee when you use your "intent"? Your "tohei leg push" picture is incorrect because if the resultant vector is really pointing at a 45 degree angle upwards from the pushee, then to maintain static equilibrium the pusher would have to provide an equal and opposite down-and-forward force, which you're denying here.

Last edited by James - Huang : 07-13-2010 at 07:26 PM.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 07:30 PM   #27
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
They either lean on you or don't lean on you.

If the scale went up under your feet, that means the total amount of weight coming down on your feet increased. That means someone's leaning on you, and furthermore if the pusher was standing on a scale, their weight would decrease if they started leaning. There's no way to increase the total combined weight, so they must be leaning.

If they are not leaning at all, then you can only use the friction reaction force.
Well, trying to be fair, I can see where your hangup is, but I'm not going to tell you the part that you're obviously missing. I take that back... I'll show you personally for free, but for my payment I get to post who you really are, so you'll have to make arrangements to get the information you're so obviously lacking through p.m. using the James Huang identity. Of course, if you don't want to do it, that's fine, too. One of the things that I think is worth watching is how many people won't go after clearly important information. Not that I care except for watching people get older and still not know basic information; it's part of my study of human psychology in the Asian martial arts.

Regards,

Mike
 
Old 07-13-2010, 07:38 PM   #28
James - Huang
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
I make no "small vertical circular movement". I make no movement at all since I use what is known as "intent" to change forces. Since I change my force sourcing using "intent", my intent has to do something to control the incoming purely horizontal force and neutralize it into static equilibrium. That should be enough for anyone to figure it out (although the "how to" probably takes someone showing it). Of course, someone who really knew this stuff should have known that without challenging me to state the obvious, right? Ergo......

Regards,

Mike Sigman
Yea, your intent activates muscles. Not fascia, not blood vessels, not skin, not electromagnetic fields, and not a spontaneously generated layer of extra fibrous tissue. There's no conscious motor innervation to those areas.

If you make a motion like the taiji opening movement when someone's pushing on you, then they lean on you. CXW has plenty of demos of that. If nothing in your body changed state upon your intent changing, then we have true magic occuring. The only thing that isn't skeletal muscle that you can consciously adjust is your bladder and a few random other sphincters.

I can also see where your hangup is, which is that you posted a completely incorrect free body diagram and have been passing it around for years as the cornerstone of your little system. I won't go into all the nonsensical fascia stuff which anyone with a small amount of biological background would quickly discount as hocus-pocus, either...

By the way, this IS actually my real name, and I'm half filipino, not full chinese. I cook for a living. Ring any bells?

Last edited by akiy : 07-14-2010 at 10:27 AM.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 07:49 PM   #29
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
Yea, your intent activates muscles. Not fascia, not blood vessels, not skin, not electromagnetic fields, and not a spontaneously generated layer of extra fibrous tissue. There's no conscious motor innervation to those areas and your wife would be able to tell you that if you asked her.
(I'm beginning to get an idea of who you are, so this is probably a silly conversation) I generally agree with you about motor innervation, although there is this:

http://www.somatics.de/FasciaResearchBook.htm

Regardless, your initial comment was about me making a circle, not about me triggering muscles. I agree that muscles are "triggered" and I've never said differently anywhere.
Quote:

If you make a motion like the taiji opening movement when someone's pushing on you, then they lean on you. CXW has plenty of demos of that. If nothing in your body changed state upon your intent changing, then we have true magic occuring. The only thing that isn't skeletal muscle that you can consciously adjust is your bladder and a few random other sphincters.
Doesn't change what I just said, though.
Quote:
I can also see where your hangup is, which is that you posted a completely incorrect free body diagram and have been passing it around for years as the cornerstone of your little system. I won't go into all the nonsensical fascia stuff which anyone with a small amount of biological background would quickly discount as hocus-pocus, either...
No, please... start another post with your analysis of what I've said that is wrong. Be happy to defend it without belittling you with comments about "your little system", etc. I enjoy a good debate.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
 
Old 07-13-2010, 08:38 PM   #30
Tim Fong
 
Tim Fong's Avatar
Dojo: Aunkai
Location: California
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 175
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

I have been contacted by several people asking me if I am posting as James Huang. She or he is not me.

That probably won't allay the suspicion of those who are paranoid narcissists, but to that I can only say "your mental illness is not my problem."
 
Old 07-13-2010, 09:13 PM   #31
thisisnotreal
 
thisisnotreal's Avatar
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 693
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

hi James - wicked posts. thanks for the thoughts. and the level of detail

For the thread,
some shiny things i found that i can point to

shiko
tanren: Intro 1
tanren: intro 2
tanren: part 1
tanren: part 2
tanren: part 3
tanren: part 4
tanren: part 5

due and thanks to a very interesting post over on e-budo here<, about some exercises to get the structure going. I don't speak japanese; and french is lousy, .. so i don't know how helpful this is...anyhoo...using google translate. (Thanks CC!)

Last edited by thisisnotreal : 07-13-2010 at 09:19 PM.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 09:15 PM   #32
Thomas Campbell
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 407
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Tim Fong wrote: View Post
I have been contacted by several people asking me if I am posting as James Huang. She or he is not me.
James will be quite relieved to find out that you are not he/she, Tim.

And just for the record . . . no one has contacted me asking if I am posting as James Huang. I feel . . . left out.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 09:40 PM   #33
gregstec
Dojo: Aiki Kurabu
Location: Elizabethtown, PA
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,110
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Nope. Draw a simple vector diagram and you'll see why Nage's weight on the scale must change.

BTW (and this is for Greg S., too), I agree completely with Don Magee's signature line:

"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough" - Albert Einstein

If you're reduced to describing how to do things with "visualize that you're....", you don't know it very well.

FWIW

Mike Sigman

Oops.... I just noticed that James Huang deleted his post. Too bad.
I take an opportunity to inject a little neutral humor in the thread and you see that as an opportunity to take a cheap shot at me and resurrect a dead issue; so be it. Negativity breeds negativity, and karma will prevail - you are old enough to know that what goes around comes around and some day there will be a price to pay for those cheap shots. I truly feel sorry for you since I do believe you have skill in aiki but you are tainted with all this negativity and that just does not lend itself to an harmonious environment for a positive and constructive exchange of knowledge.

I also believe that you will come back with what you consider a witty counter attack to my post - don't bother since my post is not an attack on you but just a statement of my views - a real man would just accept it for what it is and let it go; which I intend to do from this point forward.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 10:26 PM   #34
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Greg Steckel wrote: View Post
I take an opportunity to inject a little neutral humor in the thread and you see that as an opportunity to take a cheap shot at me and resurrect a dead issue;
Not a bit. It was a very clinical comment I made. If you have something to contribute other than "this is the way we did it with so-and-so" blow me out of the water with some facts and physics. That's what I mean. In the 90's if someone came onto the Neijia List and had a better way, the first thing we asked was for facts, not opinions. Take it as a compliment and drive the stake into my heart. Same choice I gave "James Huang" who has now brought both me and my wife into the discussion.

FWIW

Mike Sigman
 
Old 07-13-2010, 11:17 PM   #35
DH
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,394
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Thomas Campbell wrote: View Post
James will be quite relieved to find out that you are not he/she, Tim.
.
I had originally figured California or Colorado for most likely candidates...
The cutting "style" in the picture was unmistakable, so I looked him up.
Shinkendo site
http://www.shinkendo.com/honbu.html
James is listed as a teacher.
I am sure that people who have followed various forums and personalities will find the Shinkendo connection no surprise.
Good luck in your training James
Dan
 
Old 07-14-2010, 12:11 AM   #36
James - Huang
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
I had originally figured California or Colorado for most likely candidates...
The cutting "style" in the picture was unmistakable, so I looked him up.
Shinkendo site
http://www.shinkendo.com/honbu.html
James is listed as a teacher.
I am sure that people who have followed various forums and personalities will find the Shinkendo connection no surprise.
Good luck in your training James
Dan
Does that guy look half-filipino to you Dan? That's not me. He's way too ugly.

Last edited by James - Huang : 07-14-2010 at 12:14 AM.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 12:12 AM   #37
James - Huang
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Hi Josh,

Those links are quite good and point to the need for a large variety of exercises, not just pure "internal movement" based ones, in order to get strong. It's a huge mistake to think that once you have "internal movement skill" that all your physical activity needs are magically taken care of. It's just like how the spirituality folks think that once they reach "enlightenment" all of their problems will disappear. They won't.

Here's a short segment on power-lifting and some techniques needed to counteract their negative effects on internal movement skill. If anything, if you power lift correctly you'll get quite strong and beat most people who don't do this even if you don't get any internal movements.

Deadlift

Deadlift strengthens spinal extensors, glutes, hamstrings, and latissimus with peripheral benefits to the abs and a large amount of other muscles. I won't go into biomechanical detail since these are so well studied. These are the biggest muscles in your body and regardless of what martial art you do and how un-similar these are to the internal movement method, if you want a large amount of brute strength, healthy bones, and a strong grip it's a good idea to do these. The "sumo" variant (legs wider apart) is described below, since it's a little safer for the lower back.

Step 1: Get a barbell and apply 45 lbs plates to either side (At first. Use more weight later.) Put it on the floor.

Step 2: Put your feet 2x shoulder width apart and spread the feet out 60 -- 90 degrees relative to each other. Grip the bar with an overhand grip at shoulder width.

Step 3: To grab the bar: bend at the hip socket, squat down at the knees, look up and forward throughout the movement, make sure your spine is flat or a little lordotic, and make sure the scapulas are pulled back.

Step 4: clench your anus and inhale so pressure builds in the lower abdomen. Flex the abdominal muscles in order to contain the pressure. Maintain all of the conditions in step 3 and pull the bar up to hip level very quickly by driving the heels into the floor, exhale, and thrusting the hips forward. Knees should not go more than an inch or so past the toes if at all.

Step 5: Inhale a new lungful of air and lower the bar very slowly while maintaining all of the conditions in step 3 and exhaling uniformly while lowering the bar. Maintaining all of the requirements is extremely important to avoid injury and to get the most out of the exercise.

For grappling purposes you should do a weight which is around 60% of your one-rep max for four to five sets of eight to ten reps, with a couple minutes of rest in between. Always eat and drink water after, not before, you lift weights. Prior to lifting weights, it's a good idea to run or walk and swing your arms and legs around a bit and elevate the heart rate enough to induce a little bit of sweating. Right after you lift weights, don't stretch or go sit down. Instead, begin doing calisthenics such as finger pushups or bodyweight squats mixed in with shiko and horse stance. This will enhance circulation to all the muscles you just used and will notify your brain as to which parts utilized in the shiko movement were strengthened by doing the lifts. If you want to make the lifts a little harder, use 35 lb plates instead of 45 lb plates as the biggest plate in the stack in order to lower the weight towards the ground and increase the amount of work performed per rep.

After working out, drink 2% fat chocolate milk. It contains the most optimized combination of water, carbohydrate and protein for recovery, and is equal or better than most of the synthetic formulas and is cheap.

Reasonable standards for amount of weight lifted can be found here: http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLi...Standards.html You should expect to rapidly gain strength for about two months and then make gains much more slowly after that. It's a good idea to train up to at least that point since you'll get much stronger without a size increase, since most of the strength increase up to that point is due to increased innervation and not hypertrophy. After that it'll be mostly hypertrophy, and you'll have to eat a lot of extra food as well as keep lifting in order to maintain that.

There are two main negative effects of the deadlift on your ability to do the "internal" movements.

#1 is that your abs and posterior chain will get used to firing all at once, and this pattern will be very strongly reinforced due to the intensity of deadlifts. Since your internal movements are based on the ability to use contralateral sides of the large torso muscles independently as described in the shiko post, this is bad. You'll also get sore from lifting and this will make it hard to identify the right things to activate.

+ the remedy: between sets and after the workout, after you're completely tired out, now do your internal movement exercises and lots of bodyweight calisthenics.

#2 is that your trapezius in particular is strongly activated during the deadlift and the increased tonus will stay around and destabilize the shoulders unless you do something about it.

+ the remedy: pushups, with the spine completely straight.

Last edited by James - Huang : 07-14-2010 at 12:16 AM.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 12:25 AM   #38
James - Huang
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Not a bit. It was a very clinical comment I made. If you have something to contribute other than "this is the way we did it with so-and-so" blow me out of the water with some facts and physics. That's what I mean. In the 90's if someone came onto the Neijia List and had a better way, the first thing we asked was for facts, not opinions. Take it as a compliment and drive the stake into my heart. Same choice I gave "James Huang" who has now brought both me and my wife into the discussion.

FWIW

Mike Sigman
Hey man, I've posted the free body diagram. It's on the first page. Feel free to explain why that picture is less accurate than your tohei-leg-push one.

Facts and physics are fine but it doesn't seem like you're interested in that with responses like "I know whats wrong with your diagram but I'm not going to tell you". Also unhelpful is your assertion that visualizations are unhelpful as how-tos, and in the next breath you start talking about "intent". I seem to recall the condensing-breath exercise you posted a long time back also involved visualization of air going in and out of the skin. So was that meant as a how-to or not?

You also have not explained why one would want to waste time doing the condensing breath exercise in terms of what benefits one can expect in terms of increasing some physical or performance attribute, and in what kind of time scales, the mechanism of the exercise, or what is being conditioned. Without these parts of the explanation, it's safe to say that they're nearly worthless in terms of providing actionable advice to others.

If you want another to see another free body diagram that involves torque about the feet due to the push, we can do that too. However, it still does not explain your assertion that a pusher can increase the weight borne by the pushee's feet without some degree of leaning.

Last edited by James - Huang : 07-14-2010 at 12:32 AM.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 02:24 AM   #39
Flintstone
Dojo: Wherever I happen to be
Location: Zaragoza
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 587
Spain
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
Right here
Would love to see the torques and shears diagrams too. This drawing is also not very accurate in terms of physics.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 02:42 AM   #40
jss
Location: Rotterdam
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 459
Netherlands
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
If they are not leaning at all, then you can only use the friction reaction force.
If that's true then the best analogy of me resisting a horizontal push in the way you described, would be a rock of exactly my size and weight, right?
 
Old 07-14-2010, 02:53 AM   #41
Flintstone
Dojo: Wherever I happen to be
Location: Zaragoza
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 587
Spain
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Joep Schuurkes wrote: View Post
If that's true then the best analogy of me resisting a horizontal push in the way you described, would be a rock of exactly my size and weight, right?
No. Your body has way too many more degrees of freedom than the average rock.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 03:07 AM   #42
James - Huang
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Alejandro Villanueva wrote: View Post
Would love to see the torques and shears diagrams too. This drawing is also not very accurate in terms of physics.
What's not accurate? Yes, there's no torques on that picture, or the shear force between the front and back sides (not that the shear force is signifcant at all for this diagram). I didn't specifiy the height at which the force was applied, so there's no way I could put in a torque.

There's a torque about the feet, which can be resisted by having a large stomach. On a normally proportioned person, the torque factor is more significant than the friction factor.

And yes, resisting it in the way that is described originally IS like a rock. If you didn't resist in that way it would be even easier to push over than a rock, since the top would bend first in a human. However, it's possible to stand against what looks like much larger forces by doing stuff with your torso so the other guy isn't actually pushing you. In any case, the goal of that exercise is not to resist a large horizontal force, it's to learn to coordinate a couple of different muscles that usually don't turn on simultaneously while standing.

Look here, if you go around neutralizing joint locks or chest pushes against big, heavy, strong people, it is NOT because your tissue is transmitting all that force because an equal and opposite vector matches the incoming force, it's because the force never got exerted on you in the first place. You think Sagawa's tissues were so incredibly conditioned as a 90 year old that he was actually transmitting all that force through his body when he threw people or redirected their force? Not quite, since like you observed, a rock is more conditioned than Sagawa is, and rocks aren't known for being able to throw people or be able to redirect anything.

That's the whole point of why the tohei leg push picture and the vector stuff is completely irrelevant to how to do the stuff.

Last edited by James - Huang : 07-14-2010 at 03:14 AM.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 04:05 AM   #43
jss
Location: Rotterdam
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 459
Netherlands
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
However, it's possible to stand against what looks like much larger forces by doing stuff with your torso so the other guy isn't actually pushing you.
Care to elaborate?

Quote:
Look here, if you go around neutralizing joint locks or chest pushes against big, heavy, strong people, it is NOT because your tissue is transmitting all that force because an equal and opposite vector matches the incoming force, it's because the force never got exerted on you in the first place.
<snip>
That's the whole point of why the tohei leg push picture and the vector stuff is completely irrelevant to how to do the stuff.
I disgaree. You need to be able to do the Tohei leg push-thingy, then you make a slight change to it et voilą it looks like a strong push, to the pusher it feels like a strong push, but in fact, it isn't.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 05:38 AM   #44
Flintstone
Dojo: Wherever I happen to be
Location: Zaragoza
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 587
Spain
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
What's not accurate? Yes, there's no torques on that picture, or the shear force between the front and back sides (not that the shear force is signifcant at all for this diagram). I didn't specifiy the height at which the force was applied, so there's no way I could put in a torque.
I mean you were always referring to a horizontal chest push, so the push force would not be applied to the center of mass. Also the friction force would be applied to the lower part of the soles of the feet, not to the CM. And thus torques begin to appear.

Please I'm very interested in your elaboration of these diagrams.

Thanks.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 08:14 AM   #45
DH
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,394
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
Does that guy look half-filipino to you Dan? That's not me. He's way too ugly.
Well then pray tell...who do you train with? What have you trained? Where are you located

You came in taking a bite out of me (admittedly with humor) then went on to state that you agreed with me and can do what I do, then went on to describe training methods, the likes of which I do NOT do. I have to admit I have heard all of this before. Would you like to meet and test those theories of your's out and then talk shop after?
Dan
 
Old 07-14-2010, 08:30 AM   #46
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
Facts and physics are fine but it doesn't seem like you're interested in that with responses like "I know whats wrong with your diagram but I'm not going to tell you". Also unhelpful is your assertion that visualizations are unhelpful as how-tos, and in the next breath you start talking about "intent". I seem to recall the condensing-breath exercise you posted a long time back also involved visualization of air going in and out of the skin. So was that meant as a how-to or not?
I already told you how to do the trick by changing force vectors without moving. If you have that skill, what I said was very obvious and basic. If you don't have that skill you will need to be shown how to do it; I made you an offer. The visualization for condensing breathing is a visualization which might help some people and might not help others; it is not as precise as a description of the how and why it is done.
Quote:
You also have not explained why one would want to waste time doing the condensing breath exercise in terms of what benefits one can expect in terms of increasing some physical or performance attribute, and in what kind of time scales, the mechanism of the exercise, or what is being conditioned. Without these parts of the explanation, it's safe to say that they're nearly worthless in terms of providing actionable advice to others.
Well, I don't remember the precise post involved, but if it was the one where I gave that how-to as a stated beginner training step, I mentioned the health aspect of it, which is important. It's also a great basic training exercise because the benefits can be used martially, after they have been trained enough. However, point me to the post and I'll look at it... I doubt that I would say how to do something like that without mentioning some benefit to it.
Quote:

If you want another to see another free body diagram that involves torque about the feet due to the push, we can do that too. However, it still does not explain your assertion that a pusher can increase the weight borne by the pushee's feet without some degree of leaning.
I said "intent". Mental manipulation of forces. Of course, if you're as advanced as you purport to be, I assumed that such a basic answer would be obvious to you. I know that a number of people on this forum can do this thing (they have shown me, so this isn't a surmise) and to them my answer was probably a correct and basic answer to your question.

Regards,

Mike Sigman

Last edited by Mike Sigman : 07-14-2010 at 08:43 AM.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 08:53 AM   #47
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
You came in taking a bite out of me (admittedly with humor) then went on to state that you agreed with me and can do what I do, then went on to describe training methods, the likes of which I do NOT do.
Of course I haven't been paying the strictest attention to each of his posts, but James Huang was posting what I (and most others) assumed was some sort of joke and perhaps a veiled reference to terms Dan *may* have used in some context (I haven't paid that much attention, so I may be wrong). The problem is that Huang is now indicating that he is not making a joke but is serious in his analyses, so it's pretty confusing how to take his statements in toto. If he's serious, I don't seem to have much of a common dialogue/understanding with what he's talking about, so I'm going to bail on this also.

FWIW

Mike Sigman
 
Old 07-14-2010, 12:17 PM   #48
gregstec
Dojo: Aiki Kurabu
Location: Elizabethtown, PA
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,110
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
James Huang wrote: View Post
Does that guy look half-filipino to you Dan? That's not me. He's way too ugly.
Maybe there are more pics to choose from at the below link - so, which one of you do you like best?

http://www.mashuudojo.com/photos.htm
 
Old 07-14-2010, 12:49 PM   #49
Erick Mead
 
Erick Mead's Avatar
Dojo: Big Green Drum (W. Florida Aikikai)
Location: West Florida
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,505
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Quote:
Greg Steckel wrote: View Post
Gee wiz Mike, now you went and did it - you mentioned physics and now we are going to have Eric jump in and drown us in talk about SHEARS


And FWIW -- I no pinoy (though I do love lumpia)...

Last edited by Erick Mead : 07-14-2010 at 12:52 PM.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 12:56 PM   #50
C. David Henderson
Location: Santa Fe New Mexico
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 606
United_States
Offline
Re: some exercises for getting the structure going and why they're done

Hint,

The picture already posted has an informative caption.

David Henderson
 

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:40 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate