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Old 06-18-2010, 10:27 PM   #26
L. Camejo
 
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Dojo: Ontario Martial Arts
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Re: Multiple opponents strategy

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
Hey Larry!

I think it is always important to keep that perspective in mind regardless of your situation. You could be doing well and winning the fight and then...boom...it is all over. So, we have to be careful I think to not get too involved or too enamored with our success or failure in these situations...they are what they are.
Hi Kevin,

I've been away for a while so I haven't been able to follow up on the thread since my question.

I totally agree about your comment on winning above and not getting enamored with ones success. Imho if these emotions come into play to the point where performance is affected something is missing in ones training if it is with this objective in mind.

The reason I asked the question was that in my own multiple attacker encounter I was singled out by 8 guys, there was no-one (on my side at least) coming with superior firepower and the cops were over a block away and oblivious to the situation.

Re-thinking that encounter I had - I think the idea of someone coming along with more firepower on the attacker's side makes the urgency of ending the conflict as quickly as possible even more important.

This actually goes back to the multiple attacker concept where it is important to control the speed and rhythm of the engagement by always being a few steps ahead of your attackers. OODA loop indeed.

Thanks you helped me to sort of solve my own question.

Happy training.

Larry

Last edited by L. Camejo : 06-18-2010 at 10:30 PM.

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Old 06-18-2010, 10:33 PM   #27
L. Camejo
 
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Re: Multiple opponents strategy

Quote:
Larry Novick wrote: View Post
For me, Randori is an exercise in decisive, proactive positioning, movement, efficiency, and technique, all within the context of safety and flow. It isn't complete jiyuwaza.

There are of course many different tenets that help to understand how to approach it, some that I use are:

Be Proactive - Never wait for another person to initiate, even if this means simply choosing to pass someone by. Don't worry, they'll find you again later.

Never back up (if you can help it.)

Adhere to "Aiki-engagement" - that is, don't engage in a manner that gives the other person an advantage or control over you. Part of this means stay loose and don't stay with any one person for any length of time, trying to do something. The longer you do, the more likely they, or someone else, will get you.

Deal with them one-by-one, but in relation to all of them.

Move, move, move. Again, don't get stuck on a technique, or one person.

Control the space through positioning as much as possible. Try for the open space, with everyone in front of you. Stay on the outside as much as possible.

Do technique when it flows. When you do, be decisive.

Don't get caught up in frenetic energy. The goal is to survive. There are technical and strategic ways of dealing with every situation. That's part of the practice.
Brilliant post! I think this covers all of the core aspects of good multiple attacker training.

Best
LC

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