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Old 10-18-2009, 09:25 AM   #76
George S. Ledyard
 
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Being different than what you are looking for-in aikido? Can you define that. Aiki is aikido. There is no other.
Dan,
This is one of the things that makes these discussions difficult for people. As someone who has trained with a number of people who are really off the charts in their skills, it seems to me that there are different ways in which people manifest these skills.

While I haven't yet had a chance to train with you, I have trained just a tiny bit with Ark and Mike S. Enough to feel what they do. By all description it sounds to me as if you have also developed that same sort of structure and with it the kind of power that seems out of proportion to the effort put in. Ushiro Kenji Sensei would be in this group as well.

However, I have also trained with Kuroda Tetsugen, Toby Threadgill, Don Angier, Howard Popkin and some others who I would say are certainly using "aiki" yet ones experience of it is different. With these guys one seldom feels much of anything. Don Angier and Kuroda Tetsugen being foremost in the category of "I have no idea why I just fell down". You can grab these guys and you don't feel a thing, you simply start moving.

I would put my teachers, Saotome Sensei and Ikeda Sensei somewhere in the middle on this. Not quite as soft as Kuroda and Angier and not quite as overtly possessed of explosive power as the Ark, Ushiro, Sigman, and I assume yourself, group (although certainly with enough to get the job done).

Then there are the Systema folks who are certainly using "aiki" but manifest those skills in a way that is different than any of the folks mentioned.

Anyway, so much of these discussions seems to revolve around the "power" issue that I think it misleads people a bit. The experience of training with many of these aforementioned people is not primarily one of how "powerful" they are. More, it's one of how powerful you are not. You never feel man handled by any of these teachers. In fact, they'd prefer that you not feel anything until you find yourself headed to the floor. My experience of locking techniques done by these people is that you don't even experience their power at the point of the lock, you simply find your center under control.

So unlike many folk's experience with certain top Aikido teachers, which is one of constant pain and often injury, receiving a technique like nikkyo from one of them doesn't even seem to hurt the wrist but rather goes straight to your center,

Anyway, there seems to be a difference in the way that internal skills are manifested in different styles. So I suspect that people seeking out training that will result in these skills will also manifest them differently in their Aikido depending on with whom they have been training.

When there seems to be resistance to some of what you guys are saying here, I think it results from a misunderstanding of what you are talking about and a lack of experience feeling the range in how these skills are manifest. A presentation of "aiki" as a sort of unitary skill set without which Aikido really can't be Aikido is a bit misleading for many folks. I understand what you are saying. At the heart of these skills there are certain things in common, especially the conditioning exercises (however done). But ones experience of these skills in different styles can be widely divergent. I think that many folks, myself included, are looking for an Aikido which is on the soft side, in which the "power" is implicit, rather than explicit most of the time. With an "stopping power" held in a state of potential, but available when needed.

I am not saying that you guys can't do this. I am saying that the way in which these discussions usually proceed and the manner in which you express yourselves doesn't make this clear to folks who do not have a very broad experience of the principle of "aiki" in action.

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
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Old 10-18-2009, 09:27 AM   #77
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Ki Symbol Re: blending with the atack.

Quote:
Mary Eastland wrote: View Post
Blending is not something that happens in your mind. If you are finding uke problematic...slow down. Relax more and be really soft.
Handle your uke like you would a newborn baby.
Mary
Mary,

I have read the quote of O'sensei saying this and my sensei has stated it as well. I feel that it certainly is an "ideal" to strive for. Why would one not want to be as smooth, soft--in terms of touch not necessarily result, fluid and dynamic as possible. I am making an assumption that one desires their Aikido to be practically applicable. I realize that there are those who could care less and just love the exercise, social time, and potlucks.

I thinks that it is safe to assume that O'sensei was--not that he wasn't already incredible--very advanced when he said this. You know the urban myth of pinning 10 men with a finger sort of thing. One may have to consult a John Stevens book to be sure.

My point is that so often Aikidoka quote O'sensei when he had the ability and life experience to see life a certain way. Like I said an ideal to aspire to-I am going to go out on a limb here--most of us are not that good (at least yet). So while aspiring to be soft and not needlessly injure an attacker are certainly noble, perhaps one should give greater weight to just making sure "their aikido" works and set oneself up to just survive and walk away from a physical encounter.

The risk of not doing so is that something very bad could happen and one may not live or be able at least to continue training long enough to get to the place O'sensei was. So often, people want to take the short-cut to quote the lofty ideals of O'sensei-especially in his more reflective later years, not keeping in mind all the ability that existed naturally already allowing him to transcend to a more philosophical view of Aikido.
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Old 10-18-2009, 09:59 AM   #78
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
Erick, May I ask, "What is it exactly you want to know Proof of?" I am still left wondering. Truth be told, I only think a matter of friendship is at stake here.
It isn't that I want or lack proof. I am satisfied of abilities of people those with direct knowledge talk about, be it Dan, Ark, Mike or what have you. If there is a criticism to be laid on another person, unnamed, or a group of people, unnamed, in comparison to them -- then it is only fair to make the criticism and comparison objective, specific and illustrate it with examples and descriptions, so that those considering the criticism fairly are in position to judge for themselves.

The phenomenon of aiki, as I have come to understand it, actively uses one's own and directly manipulates another person's reflexive-kinesthetic system (the mechanism is known-- if poorly explored outside of our practical use). That leaves one interpreting a physical action that the mind is reporting secondhand and after the fact -- with no contemporaneous notes. Mentally, it seems a "black box" process, because the action is not voluntarily mediated -- though it can be trained, and voluntarily prompted-- there is no doubt. But the prompt and the result have no simple linear connection - which is the perception of "divine action" or takemusu.

As regards the topic of "blending" its main value, in my eyes is in trying to get the predictive, scheming mind out of the interaction, and learn to let the process function in closer awareness instead of planned if-action; then-reaction =result. I actually see the issue of training the generalized label of "intent" as similar, trying to drive the conscious mind in closer alignment to the unmediated process as the driver without falling into simplistic linear Tab A --Slot B voluntary action.

Those aspects only reinforce the need to speak to objective categories -- because most of those who have learned it necessarily interpret and describe it subjectively in widely differing ways. The conscious mind latches onto the closest element of perception in either the input or result or both -- trying to describe the process it cannot actually perceive. Neither approximation is objectively correct, although both are present and perceptible -- and the non-linearity of the process means that slight difference in the prompt leads to disproportionately altered result - so efforts at repeat performance do not illustrate the linear connection -- because there isn't one. There is a connection but it is not linear, and therefore not trivially predictable.

In short, chains of "Yah, sure, uh-huh" witnesses agreeing with broadside criticism in generalities is -- well, not very persuasive, of who actually exhibits what aspects of what we are speaking about, now is it? And they do differ in perception as I have said and in application, in part because of these inherent differences in perception. I have a brief for accurate description and discussion, and no brief against anything or anyone -- but if one will accept the levels of broadly vague criticism offered as persuasive of anything, then I have some very fine bottom land on the Escambia river mouth I'd like to interest you in ...

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 10-18-2009, 11:34 AM   #79
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Erick - With all due respect; It seems to me you are changing your story. Your writing doesn't seem sincere to me. I just don't understand all this. Obviously it is fine if you just want to talk and think out-loud on-line but I suggest that you should drop the recurring put-on of a dispassionate scientific plea. It doesn't seem real anymore. Even in court and in science you have to actually show up for the evidence/experiment.
Erick - this is now the 2nd and last time I will apologize to you in this or any thread. I am sorry for interrupting your business. I tried to help but I see it will not work. I liked some of your thoughts but I don't know whats going on any more.
I am beginning to think you will not let this end well.
Josh
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Old 10-18-2009, 12:11 PM   #80
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
a. I challenged that position.
b. I offered to come to you, no reply
c. I offered to test you and your teacher, then show you, and take you to dinner- no response.
Dan -- if you really want to know why there was no response, ask -- and I'll tell you.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 10-18-2009, 12:35 PM   #81
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Re: Blending with the attack.

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George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
Dan,
I am not saying that you guys can't do this. I am saying that the way in which these discussions usually proceed and the manner in which you express yourselves doesn't make this clear to folks who do not have a very broad experience of the principle of "aiki" in action.
Thanks for clearing up my confusion Sensei Ledyard and it seems I too have felt at times what you're describing through some of the same people...

Aiki is not all about "power" Aiki is about "love" and as strange as this sounds I think this was O'Sensei wish for what he thought Aiki through Aikido should become...
Otherwise if I was given the Power of Aiki It might go to my head and thus become a huge obstacle in the path of my spiritual journey.

RE I didn't come to Aikido to learn how to destroy people with my "power" but to save myself from such thoughts and actions...

I am done with "just fighting"

William Hazen
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Old 10-18-2009, 12:39 PM   #82
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Blending with the attack.

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Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
Erick - With all due respect; It seems to me you are changing your story.
I believe my point has been fairly consistent. http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...7&postcount=37

Why is it "bad form" to ask for unattributed "testimonies" that

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote:
... no teacher in the art has been able to use their understanding of aiki from Aikido™ in any successful fashion
be attributed and described? Asking that such testimonies be given attribution -- and criticisms in such broad generalities be made specific with examples? It doesn't take a law degree to see the point in that. You had given no offense to me so I don't see why you felt you were apologizing to begin with.

For some reason I cannot fathom my observations seem disproportionately provocative to some people -- but objectively speaking -- there is nothing provocative in them - nor any intended.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 10-18-2009, 12:54 PM   #83
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Re: Blending with the attack.

it's not bad form to ask. at all.
you asked; i submit the answer (which you don't seem to like) is that the well-known name-brand people who came, saw, showed up and witnessed first-hand do, in fact, continue 'to offer testimony' in the form of 'voting with their feet' in that they continue to train in the new way.
clear?
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Old 10-18-2009, 01:18 PM   #84
George S. Ledyard
 
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Re: Blending with the attack.

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William Hazen wrote: View Post
Thanks for clearing up my confusion Sensei Ledyard and it seems I too have felt at times what you're describing through some of the same people...

Aiki is not all about "power" Aiki is about "love" and as strange as this sounds I think this was O'Sensei wish for what he thought Aiki through Aikido should become...
Please William, don't open that can of worms... As far as I am concerned, discussions of this sort need to be kept within the family so to speak. I pretty much look to teachers who can help me develop my skills for the technical know how. But you can't throw out stuff like this and expect to have any sort of productive discussion... folks just go into their feeding frenzy. Even O-Sensei's own students had a hard time staying with him on this one so I can't see how any of us will fare better. I have my own thoughts about this stuff and largely keep them to myself except in the most general sorts of terms.

George S. Ledyard
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Old 10-18-2009, 01:43 PM   #85
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Hello George
What I am discussing that is "power"...is softness. In-yo-ho. They are held in balance. In short they exist together. Manifesting either one is a choice and they can many times be displayed both at the same time.
I don't concern myself with those who train for power-its just not my interest. It's a faster way to train, and it works, but in the end, I think it's too limiting; it will not produce aiki under any definition I care to use, so it's just not how I chose to train.
You are correct that people in aikido don't understand how and where power and aiki merge as one.
We also agree that-of course- each player can emphasize certain aspects over others. For example; I occasionally choose to play aikido with ukes, play judo, play push hands, but I'd rather play MMA. For me the same internal training permeates all. And to be frank I just listed them in the order of their ease in execution.
Using aiki in MMA is not something most men are capable of. Training the mind/ body connection and training for what you need to sustain it and use it under that level of stress is rare.

Blending
Oddly enough I choose to blend with the attack of an MMA fighter the same way I choose to blend with an Aikidoka. Entering their space is not just positional work. That's the easy stuff. taking control of their intent and response and reaction and controlling what they consider to be "their fight" is where the real fun is. People might not understand it when they see me moving, and that's alright by me. I have my own versions of your "I don't know how I fell down" testimony but it is usually under more intense conditions than wrist grabs, single throw attacks and ukemi- it often involves a free range of freestyle attacks on me and them being thrown, kicked, or knocked for a loop, and seeing the fighter stand there and be absolutely confused at how all of this is happening to him. It's just an opinion, but after that everything else is just kind of a cake walk.
Again you are correct that it's a choice, but in my experience playing with aikido teachers or going to MMA gyms are all the same to me. Blending can be ura/ irimi, or a knee to the kidney and several punches to the face and body, or maybe a throw. It's all done in the same space and time, with the same methods of control; just that the former is easier than the later.
Cheers
Dan
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Old 10-18-2009, 01:59 PM   #86
George S. Ledyard
 
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Hello George
What I am discussing that is "power"...is softness. In-yo-ho. They are held in balance. In short they exist together. Manifesting either one is a choice and they can many times be displayed both at the same time.
I don't concern myself with those who train for power-its just not my interest. It's a faster way to train, and it works, but in the end, I think it's too limiting; it will not produce aiki under any definition I care to use, so it's just not how I chose to train.
You are correct that people in aikido don't understand how and where power and aiki merge as one.
We also agree that-of course- each player can emphasize certain aspects over others. For example; I occasionally choose to play aikido with ukes, play judo, play push hands, but I'd rather play MMA. For me the same internal training permeates all. And to be frank I just listed them in the order of their ease in execution.
Using aiki in MMA is not something most men are capable of. Training the mind/ body connection and training for what you need to sustain it and use it under that level of stress is rare.

Blending
Oddly enough I choose to blend with the attack of an MMA fighter the same way I choose to blend with an Aikidoka. Entering their space is not just positional work. That's the easy stuff. taking control of their intent and response and reaction and controlling what they consider to be "their fight" is where the real fun is. People might not understand it when they see me moving, and that's alright by me. I have my own versions of your "I don't know how I fell down" testimony but it is usually under more intense conditions than wrist grabs, single throw attacks and ukemi- it often involves a free range of freestyle attacks on me and them being thrown, kicked, or knocked for a loop, and seeing the fighter stand there and be absolutely confused at how all of this is happening to him. It's just an opinion, but after that everything else is just kind of a cake walk.
Again you are correct that it's a choice, but in my experience playing with aikido teachers or going to MMA gyms are all the same to me. Blending can be ura/ irimi, or a knee to the kidney and several punches to the face and body, or maybe a throw. It's all done in the same space and time, with the same methods of control; just that the former is easier than the later.
Cheers
Dan
No argument at all. I' m way to old and beat up to want to go to some MA gym and play with all those young beach press boys. I only occasionally get one coming in to my place. I find I have stuff that they find interesting and useful but I can't really roll with them in any kind of freestyle manner. If I can get my knee rehabbed, which seems to be actually happening, I might be able to play a bit more but until then I need the controlled structure of the more predictable Aikido to practice. Even the slower practice the Systema folks generally do has made me gunshy because it is so formless that I find it difficult to protect my knee. The brace didn't really help. But I can understand the desire to work on that level, especially with folks who have no pre-programming about what to expect from you.

George S. Ledyard
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Old 10-18-2009, 02:16 PM   #87
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
i submit the answer (which you don't seem to like) is that the well-known name-brand people who came, saw, showed up and witnessed first-hand do, in fact, continue 'to offer testimony' in the form of 'voting with their feet' in that they continue to train in the new way.
clear?
No, it is not an answer. My point was not directed at those you offer in supposing their "voting with feet." I disagree with that characterization, but that's something else. My point is that criticizing people without naming them or making the criticism specifically illustrated is pointless and says nothing useful. Among other things it is unfair to make such sweeping innuendo, so as to presume "everyone" to be caught in the net. For another thing, the net's holes are too large to catch anything.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 10-18-2009, 02:26 PM   #88
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Hi George
I understand
None of that was my real point. My point was the the same aiki, the same softness exists throughout...unchanged.
It is worth mentioning again, that in/ yo ho exists in functional duality. Not mumbo jumbo, not static, or stagnant practice, but at any level, up to and including full speed exchanges with the entire body. It is the support contained in the duality that both controls their efforts and creates openings without their knowledge. So "power" in this case is contained within the adept; out is held in check by in. You cannot have one without the other and being doing aiki. That same aiki, will "roll" with anyone. It is formless.
It's not a "theory" for me. As you now know from talking with certain people.

Speaking past you for a moment
I interject in discussions of what constitues power in-use as perfectly in keeping with softness (in /yo) and that semi-cooperative and full-on play can be the same-is to keep it before those struggling with it in the art. That the form has changed from the combatives of Ueshiba's day; jujutsu, judo, kenjutsu, to now, is no excuse, and no hall pass to accept less.
It is wroth noting that Ueshiba himself was unafraid of those challenges, and the methods he employed to attain it remain so misunderstood by the vast majority. The beginning stage is to learn in yo ho and the true meaning of blending with an attack, which is vastly different than just learning where to step and when.

Cheers
Dan
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Old 10-18-2009, 02:33 PM   #89
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Re: Blending with the attack.

<groan>
I think on the one hand you have a point; and on the other you are playing word games. In my obviously relatively worthless opinion i perceive that DH has thrown down a gauntlet, as a challenge, and as a call to *your* best. Here, it is the 'royal you'..but in specific it seems also to include you, Erick. For some reason he is seemingly challenging the Aikido world at large, making himself a servant and offering aiki in yo ho to the world. Not for profit. that's what i see.
I also see that the nameless and faceless people whom were ostensibly offended, according to you, and whom you purport to defend...actually took on names and faces when they went and did the deed and visited and witnessed aiki in yo ho. And I don't think in the final analysis anyone was offended. I don't hear much other squawking or complaining.
What then?
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Old 10-18-2009, 02:53 PM   #90
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Re: Blending with the attack.

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Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
<groan> I think on the one hand you have a point; and on the other you are playing word games. In my obviously relatively worthless opinion i perceive that DH has thrown down a gauntlet, as a challenge, and as a call to *your* best. --What then?
Not word games -- I just think there are those who I might find points to criticize, and those I would not, but as you see, I try not to make criticisms personal, but factual. But making those distinctions is plainly incumbent on those raising personal criticisms as though pretending not to speak of specifics makes it less confrontational.

As to your latter point -- I do see it quite the same way -- and I join in your <groan>. But there are things you could not know, that I would not volunteer, and that Dan has not asked me about, yet.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 10-18-2009, 02:56 PM   #91
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Re: Blending with the attack.

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Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Hi George
I understand
None of that was my real point. My point was the the same aiki, the same softness exists throughout...unchanged.
It is worth mentioning again, that in/ yo ho exists in functional duality. Not mumbo jumbo, not static, or stagnant practice, but at any level, up to and including full speed exchanges with the entire body.
Hi Dan,

When you are using aiki, are you essentially keeping your backside stretched? I'm defining the backside as starting at the backs of the hands, running up the arms, down the back and to the heels. Then, whether you are striking or grabbing, you are taking your opponent's balance the moment you contact them?

Very curious about that.

Thanks,
Tim

Last edited by Tim Fong : 10-18-2009 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 10-18-2009, 03:15 PM   #92
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Erick, on behalf of everyone here; can you please say what & why?
If not; Could you please take this offline on PMs? Despite your best efforts; I am sure you have not yet been successful at killing off every last vestige of the good will that is apparent.
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Old 10-18-2009, 03:29 PM   #93
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Re: Blending with the attack.

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Tim Fong wrote: View Post
Hi Dan,

When you are using aiki, are you essentially keeping your backside stretched? I'm defining the backside as starting at the backs of the hands, running up the arms, down the back and to the heels. Then, whether you are striking or grabbing, you are taking your opponent's balance the moment you contact them?

Very curious about that.

Thanks,
Tim
Tim
That's "half" of a first step kind of thing, an identifier, but using that back line without support from the front, is not a good idea, and using both (in balance) without other more complex ways to support the body through the hara will land you on your ass when you meet someone with soft power-or even with just well developed wrestling skills. The body was meant to be used in opposing spirals.
Again you can train paths and do exercises and end up with power; real and whole. And that will make a lot of people happy.
There's just more to it than that, but everyone has to start somewhere. It's another reason that I say that not all methods are the same, and I am willing to bet they are not all leading to the same place either.
I gave advice both on line and in private discussions and made suggestions only to see it get claimed and "owned" by people never heard of, taught, or ever talked about training that way-till later. Due to the nature of my work, I am a stickler for intellectual property. it doesn't matter if the knowledge is everywhere. If you got it from someone else-you remain true about that source. I have information I have gotten from several sources in different places, I always state (at least for me) where and how that information got...to me.
I think the dialogue about sharing here was B.S. It was never an honest effort, but rather a fishing expedition to boost certain agenda's. It is why- for the most part- I opted out.
But hey, as is often stated here "Its all out there in all the Asian arts right? And everyone already knows what ever you are going to say. It's in all the arts, so no one can introduce anything that isn't already known and has been practiced for years by someone else already.
I'd suggest folks continue to keep training and meeting real experts and learning wherever you can, just make sure you credit where you got your information.
I have nothing to add about how to's.
Cheers
Dan
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Old 10-18-2009, 03:33 PM   #94
lbb
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Re: Blending with the attack.

There is no "royal you".
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Old 10-18-2009, 04:02 PM   #95
DH
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Re: Blending with the attack.

After misunderstanding your last post to me, I am hesitant to say anything at all. Can you explain what you meant?
Dan
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Old 10-18-2009, 04:20 PM   #96
DH
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Re: Blending with the attack.

I received a few more P.M.'s from folks who had similar experiences as mine with this supposed "open exchange" of IT ideas, revealing nothing more than personal agendas as groups were being established!! Oy!
I'm not happy to say I saw it, pegged it, and warned about it while it was starting. It's good news and frankly very encouraging to continue to meet and talk with some very level headed pros who have had to wind their way through this type of behavior before. I confess to a lack of skill or interest in such falderal, I have better things to do.
I will adhere to the non professional teacher, or professional seminar giver, no rank, no organization, don't call me sensei model, and just share with people so they can learn and share.
Its clean.
Dan
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Old 10-18-2009, 05:00 PM   #97
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Hi Mary - .... yeah. I think you're right. I was hoping that nobody would say anything. It sounded better than 'youse guys' in my mind. Have a good night.
; )

Josh

p.s. Why is there only a 'royal us' not a royal you? i guess it's the queen talking right?
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Old 10-18-2009, 05:13 PM   #98
Aikibu
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
Please William, don't open that can of worms... As far as I am concerned, discussions of this sort need to be kept within the family so to speak. I pretty much look to teachers who can help me develop my skills for the technical know how. But you can't throw out stuff like this and expect to have any sort of productive discussion... folks just go into their feeding frenzy. Even O-Sensei's own students had a hard time staying with him on this one so I can't see how any of us will fare better. I have my own thoughts about this stuff and largely keep them to myself except in the most general sorts of terms.
I understand George....I stand by my "experiance" of Aikido... I have been very comfortable with it for many many years thanks to Shoji Nishio's expression of what he thought Aikido should be... to whit "Sincere Heart through Austere Practice."

If folks should go into a "feeding frenzy" over my expression of Aikido It would not bother me one bit...I meant it to be personal... not provocative.

To each his own. All you did was remind me of what I consider "the obvious" and I thank you.

Back to the thread.

William Hazen
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Old 10-18-2009, 05:39 PM   #99
Thomas Campbell
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Mary Eastland wrote: View Post
Maybe, Dan, and it is different from what I am looking for. Do you have any thoughts about handling your uke like a new born baby?

Mary
Mary, while I am not exactly new born, Dan's hands-on work is not all blood-and-guts dominance. He can be very soft and subtle, "ghost-like" to use an imprecise adjective, neutralizing pushes, holds, and attempted leveraging for throws. And then he can erupt substantial power with no wind-up, just a little sense of compression and release. It's the practical range that aiki skill gives that is so impressive.

Regardless of online impressions, in person these folks are good people. Dan pointed out some specific postural corrections that have helped strengthen the musculature and heal connective tissue around where I'd crushed four thoracic vertebrae. Aspects of a couple of Akuzawa's exercises have been adapted by a Ph.D. physical therapist after I showed them to her, in connection with strengthening and rehabilitation of people with injured backs. Mike Sigman emphasizes the soft and subtle nature of becoming aware of the internal fascial/connective-tissue links, and tying it in with the breath--he took the time out from a group get-together to work one-on-one with a woman recuperating from a badly-injured hip and lower back, to suggest specific things she could do with the work he was showing that would be helpful to her particular case.

Sure, these on-line discussions can turn into screeching matches between highly-competitive, testosterone-addled alpha males. But the pearls of body/mind training insight that occasionally fall out of the clouds of flying feathers (forgive the mixed metaphors) have been tremendously useful, sometimes even inspirational, to me and some others who are honest about our own lack of these skills--to the point where we've quietly sought out training experience with these gentlemen and taken what we've been shown home to cogitate and practice. Ultimately we're all personally responsible to put in the practice, invest in loss, go "a-ha!" and repeat the cycle endlessly. That's what it takes. Few may ultimately get "it," but no one would get it if these folks weren't putting their hard-won insights out there to share with others genuinely interested in learning and cultivating internal skills.

There is always some friction in the best of blending. I'd encourage people not to lose sight of the considerable substance being offered, though it may be obscured by on-line style.
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Old 10-18-2009, 05:46 PM   #100
Thomas Campbell
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
The body was meant to be used in opposing spirals.
Thanks for that.
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