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Old 09-06-2009, 10:37 PM   #26
sammywhip
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

So tonight was a pretty good class... It was just two of us and our instructor which was nice. Now that I've had a few classes I truly understand this is a lifetime journey.
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Old 09-07-2009, 07:25 AM   #27
Shadowfax
 
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

I love when we have those kinds of class. Was fortunate to have on on Thursday night as well. I love when we have time to really explore one technique for a while before we move onto another. Just wait the longer you do this the deeper it gets.
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Old 09-11-2009, 12:50 AM   #28
sammywhip
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

Today was a really rough class for me. I actually felt like I was able to focus more on executing techniques and not thinking my way through them (except ikkyo) and then boom. I was using strength and not energy. Very tough thing to adjust to. This is hard. Fun as can be, I love it, it's just hard. I also feel bad working with more experienced people. They can only want to continue going over basics for so long without getting aggravated with me lol. Even so they are all being nice. So, hopefully I'll start improving a bit in the next month or so.
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Old 09-11-2009, 02:55 AM   #29
dalen7
 
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

Quote:
Sammy Gray wrote: View Post
Today was a really rough class for me. I actually felt like I was able to focus more on executing techniques and not thinking my way through them (except ikkyo) and then boom. I was using strength and not energy. Very tough thing to adjust to. This is hard. Fun as can be, I love it, it's just hard. I also feel bad working with more experienced people. They can only want to continue going over basics for so long without getting aggravated with me lol. Even so they are all being nice. So, hopefully I'll start improving a bit in the next month or so.
No worries, Aikido is a journey. It frustrated me until just recently.
lol

Seriously though you learn and pick up concepts at stages which go deeper, and at some point, even though you may not be 'fluid' at Aikido, you pretty much get the concepts of why it works or doesnt work, which basically then sets you up for the rest of your journey in 'mastering the techniques' as it were.

First 6 months was the hardest for me. After 2+ years I feel like I have an understanding with it. So hang in there and enjoy the ride. Its like a chess game - or more accurately, its like learning about yourself. A lot of chances to look inward, etc. [especially in my case where Im not fluent in the local language... Hungarian... it gives more rise to see the ego at work, etc. and then see what lessons I can learn both in spiritual application as well as technical.]

I think one things that throws many people is that they try to stick to close to understanding the technique vs. what makes it work.

What I mean is that Aikido is very flexible and has numerous ways a technique can be executed, especially given that there are numerous ways uke can attack you... especially if they dont practice Aikido.

Of course in this flexibility is a strict rule, so to speak, but kind of allows for a universal application of the technique to be fluid.
I would say that is keeping your center, taking ukes center, and mainly flowing with whats going on. Not waiting for the attack, but responding with the energy flow of the attacker as each uke has a different dynamic.

It has been fun to play with this concept mentioned above.
Big or small, you feel the 'energy' [personality] of the person, and you can basically be set up for the attack before its happening, so that you can respond as its happening and not wait for shomen to hit you, etc. [This is where many newer people make the mistake in waiting and then it becomes like karate or something where you are left to block... And unless your conditioned your body to strikes, it can hurt - as my recent foray into Thai boxing has proven to me.] lol

Sorry this is a bit wordy, long, but wanted to say I totally feel your frustration. If you read my older post you can see, specifically in the beginning, where I wanted to drop out. At some point you get it enough where you actually enjoy it. I had originally felt I would be more closer to striking arts, but things have flipped. [Might be due to age, Im not really 'old' per say, but my body isnt really up to being beat on like it was, say 17 years ago...]

Hopefully this is a bit of encouragement for you.

Peace

dAlen

p.s.

Dont feel bad working with more experienced people. As long as they have an opportunity sometimes to practice their stuff, its all good. [i.e. a specific advanced class, or a part of the class set aside for them, rotate out, etc.]
Its actually fun to try to share with others what you learned, and have them see if its really working or not. Sometimes a new person can show you the weaknesses in your own technique. Especially when you get someone who doesnt resist at all and is like a noodle, then techniques like Ikkyo can feel like your pushing down spaghetti. [of course there has to be some resistance and you get to teach the concepts behind things, etc., as well as have the instructor come by and correct you]

Ill add, Im a big proponent of trying to rotate where you hit practicing with each person regardless of rank. [This gives you both experience with beginners, intermediate, and advanced.] Besides this, it gives you more practice with why Aikido works or doesnt, as you are faced with extremely different circumstances. Height, gender, weight, age, etc. So you learn more about the play of energy vs. strength. [Or aptly applied strength, as strength will always be there, we are not weightless in space.] lol

Last edited by dalen7 : 09-11-2009 at 03:04 AM.

dAlen [day•lynn]
dum spiro spero - {While I have breathe - I have hope}

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Old 09-11-2009, 09:16 AM   #30
Darryl Cowens
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

Yeah Sammy.. it's funny, I also had a session last night which seemed at the time at least, a bit more full on than what I had faced to date... I think due to a combination of things, including some drilling into me of little corrections of basic things like hand and feet positions, to try and nip potential bad habits in the bud.... and I also felt I was just starting to be let out of the cotton wool a bit with my teaching...

So yeah, all very exciting for me, and a maybe a new very tiny milestone.... but at the same it is all a lot to take in, for one so green.... It is becoming clear to me that there are going to be times where you and I, and others currently at the same training level, and everyone else before us at the same stage..... are going to feel a bit overwhelmed...

Like the others have said... we just need to go with the flow, and remember that it won't happen overnight....
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Old 09-11-2009, 01:04 PM   #31
C. David Henderson
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

Sammy,

For me, working with a beginner is not aggravating; it is its own lesson. For example, because you don't already know how you're "supposed" to move when you are uke, I find out things about my own techniques that remain implicit or hidden when I'm working with someone more experienced. Another example -- watching a beginner perform a technique where, say, a particular piece is "off" can help you understand what that piece of the sequence is supposed to do.

Finally, we all have been there. It's mostly about giving back.

Regards.
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Old 09-11-2009, 01:17 PM   #32
sammywhip
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

Thanks for all the encouragement guys. I'm quite pumped for Sunday's class now.
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Old 09-11-2009, 01:47 PM   #33
Shadowfax
 
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

I really enjoyed the variety in last nights class. Worked with the bare beginner who does not know what foot to put where so I had to help him fall safe to the very experienced Shodan who I can just never move no mater what I try. Its like trying to throw a house... Sammy I think you had him at one point last night. No worries Even our Senseis have trouble moving him some times... or so they say. I'm actually beginning to find how much I can learn form this person as well.

You might notice now and then Sensei will come over and throw your partner around for a bit. Not only are they giving correction but giving them a chance I think to experience the technique at a higher level. I often enjoy the opportunity to sit back and watch or occasionally have that experience. I learn from that too.

And after all we have second hour which is where the experienced get to really play rough and rowdy. Way too fun. Shame I had to slow it down last night and nurse a muscle strain that seems to have occurred or been aggravated by the earlier class activities.

I also am really looking forward to Sunday's class.
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Old 09-12-2009, 02:39 AM   #34
John Matsushima
 
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

A man who acts without thinking is an idiot.

A man who can act without having to think is a master.

-John Matsushima

My blog on Japanese culture
http://onecorneroftheplanetinjapan.blogspot.jp/
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Old 09-13-2009, 05:38 PM   #35
lbb
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

Quote:
Sammy Gray wrote: View Post
Today was a really rough class for me. I actually felt like I was able to focus more on executing techniques and not thinking my way through them (except ikkyo) and then boom. I was using strength and not energy. Very tough thing to adjust to. This is hard. Fun as can be, I love it, it's just hard. I also feel bad working with more experienced people. They can only want to continue going over basics for so long without getting aggravated with me lol. Even so they are all being nice. So, hopefully I'll start improving a bit in the next month or so.
While it's not possible to simply choose to let go of thinking your way through a technique, I believe it is possible to choose to let go of expecting things to make sense, or expecting techniques to become easier.
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Old 09-13-2009, 09:28 PM   #36
sammywhip
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

Ah, today was a much better day. I just let go of any standards I may have for myself, and tried to feel like I wasn't holding others back. Great day at the dojo.
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Old 09-13-2009, 09:36 PM   #37
Shadowfax
 
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Re: Letting go of thinking through techniques

LOL now your learning! I agree it was a really good class. Exactly what I needed tonight. Glad you enjoyed it as well.
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