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Old 08-17-2009, 07:51 AM   #101
Lorel Latorilla
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Hunter Lonsberry wrote: View Post
Lorel, the actual quote by my old roommate was, "Japan is not a theme park!" It is asmall snipped of a much larger and at least from my viewpoint (and probably yours too) rather funny conversation.
Dammit, I messed it up. But yeah, Rob and M1st3rX told me all about this comical quotation.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 08:50 AM   #102
HL1978
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Lorel Latorilla wrote: View Post
Dammit, I messed it up. But yeah, Rob and M1st3rX told me all about this comical quotation.
Of course the funny thing is its true.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 01:29 PM   #103
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Robert John wrote: View Post
Nah, because he went from originally talking about this:

Got called on it by others, including myself, asking to elaborate on how they could be the "same," and on top of that asking what he could do, to which he simply changed the subject to being... "oh but now I'm talking about a 'different' kind of inner strength."
You may be right about his overall argument(s) on internal aiki, but it seemed this thread was about a different sense of internal strength...I haven't read all of it though so I guess I could still be wrong. It happened once before...I believe it was a tuesday.

Gambarimashyo!
 
Old 08-17-2009, 01:40 PM   #104
Marc Abrams
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
You may be right about his overall argument(s) on internal aiki, but it seemed this thread was about a different sense of internal strength...I haven't read all of it though so I guess I could still be wrong. It happened once before...I believe it was a tuesday.
Matthew:

I think that the other posters were referring to a not-so-uncommon occurrence where a keypad warrior is asked to step away from the keypad and step up to the proverbial batter's box. The keypad warrior turns out to be a want-to-prince without his clothing, who is unable to hit the balls that are pitched towards him .

Marc Abrams
 
Old 08-17-2009, 01:57 PM   #105
David Orange
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
You may be right about his overall argument(s) on internal aiki, but it seemed this thread was about a different sense of internal strength...
And that might have flown, in a naive kind of way, if he hadn't also declared that all the talk of internal mechanics is a fad and unrelated to "true" internal strength. And it just got worse from there.

David

"That which has no substance can enter where there is no room."
Lao Tzu

"Eternity forever!"

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Old 08-17-2009, 02:26 PM   #106
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Re: True Internal Strength

I think it isn't plausible to look at this thread just in terms of an affirmative meaning of "internal strength."

Rather, it is clearly a reaction to proponents of IT methods, as it defines "true internal strength" expressly by distinguishing "TIS" from "IT" (a/k/a, "not-true internal strength," or "NTIS.")

Reading the OP makes it abundantly clear the writer's appropriation of a well-established term of art, "internal strength," to talk about "character development," and the elevation of the later as the posited "true" [i.e., deeper, more profound, and more valuable] purpose of aikido training is simultaneously a way of disparaging the importance of IT ("NTIS") as it normally is understood:

Quote:
Philip Burgess wrote: View Post
Rob,

I am not the type of person who jumps on band wagons, clings to new trends and fads, or desperately seeking something out that is the cure-all. ....

[True Internal Strength] isn't the new retro martial arts fad or buzz word that can be interjected into any martial art giving it that extra little something.

Maybe, if you had a better opportunity to exercise your internal strength and not mistake that for a physical remedy to a lacking ability in your Aikido, than you might feel differently about things. You might look a peace differently.

Rob, that is what true internal strength is all about.
This is why it struck me as a violation of norms of debate for the advocate of this view to declare posts "OT" when they react to the posited distinction he first made and declare those reacting to be overly sensitive.

The point of view advocated also begs some pretty basic questions, IMO. Such as:

1. Isn't martial effectiveness of prime concern to any serious follower of a "martial path," even if that person practices for the "-do" rather than just to master the "jutsu?"

2. What factual basis exists to suggest that internal strength training is somehow contrary to character development in a martial art, much less an exercise in violence?

3. Should someone truly committed to self-transformation through a martial practice restrict their point of view, their experience, and their training, apparently based on pride and/or loyalty?

4. Is it consistent with the ideals of traditional Aikido to enter into an interaction -- even a virtual one -- that is laden with overtones of conflict, obtain the predictable reaction, and then effectively withhold one's center from the interaction (i.e., act as though the other person is just confused or overly sensitive)?

We certainly can choose to ignore the false dichotomy at the heart of this thread to the extent the topic of "character development in the martial arts" is an interesting or important topic.

Alternatively, we can go on talking about internal training issues -- some of those posts were very interesting.

But in my view it's no accident that these posts both have spun off of the OP, and its no misperception that the OP takes a shot -- gratuitously, to my way of thinking -- at "IT."

YMMV

cdh

Last edited by C. David Henderson : 08-17-2009 at 02:31 PM.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 02:30 PM   #107
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Re: True Internal Strength

David H.,

I am in awe. You said that very well, and I know I couldn't have said that as well.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
 
Old 08-17-2009, 03:11 PM   #108
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Re: True Internal Strength

Good post David! Couple of comments.

Quote:
1. Isn't martial effectiveness of prime concern to any serious follower of a "martial path," even if that person practices for the "-do" rather than just to master the "jutsu?"
I think so, I know it was true for me. Ironically, today I would not come to DO arts for this as there is way too much inefficiency to become martially efficient. When you say martial efficiency, of course, you have to define the conditions and parameters and desired endstates of that efficiency, which narrows the whole topic down to learning Techniques, Tactics, and Procedures (TTPs), which is a very, very narrow set of things that you learn to do in order to solve that problem. No need to practice a "DO" art to do that. Although the principles are there in the TTPs, I don't believe there is a big need to dwell on them indepth.

To me it is akin thinking you need to understand the physics of combustion down to the molecular level in order to simply drive a car.

We'd never consider doing that to drive to the store, but somehow when we look at martial efficiency, all of a suddened it becomes this big secret and mysterious thing full of philosophy, ethics, and secret techniques!

Quote:
2. What factual basis exists to suggest that internal strength training is somehow contrary to character development in a martial art, much less an exercise in violence?
None of course, as there are many ways people can "Self Realize" to use a clinical, non-emotional base description.

Again, for some reason when we couple this with the martial arts, all of a sudden it becomes mysterious and deep when Ironically I think the practice itself is pretty upfront and easy to understand. We train hard and properly and we learn alot about ourselves and how to do things differently IF (BIG IF) we get out of our own way, open our minds, and honestly LET GO of our egos and attachments. This has been a huge thing for me to do.

I thought I was OPEN, but meeting many of these guys in the past two years has shown me that I wasn't and that I really wasn't committed to training and doing the really difficult and mundane stuff. Still hard, but I am starting, slowly!

It is simple and not mysterious.

Quote:
3. Should someone truly committed to self-transformation through a martial practice restrict their point of view, their experience, and their training, apparently based on pride and/or loyalty?
LOL, I think I just covered this one above in #2 as well!

Quote:
4. Is it consistent with the ideals of traditional Aikido to enter into an interaction -- even a virtual one -- that is laden with overtones of conflict, obtain the predictable reaction, and then effectively withhold one's center from the interaction (i.e., act as though the other person is just confused or overly sensitive)?
I don't know....I guess I always like a "Entering" into a challenge and conflict, but there is always a chance that I am going to get cold cocked as well. (learned that the hard way over the years). What I do believe in though is knowing that I attacked hard and fast and so when I do get hit, I don't cry "foul" and "bully"...as I am the one that asked for the fight, and I know it.

Nothing wrong with asking tough questions and being critical, that is how we learn. Then again, there is "Einsteins Theory of Insanity as well!".

I agree that character develop is a good topic to discuss, specifically how we use martial practices to develop it.

I do feel though that we place way too much attachment on the whole spiritual/character development realm at the expense of training.

Aikido and Budo in general are very specific (or should be) about how we do those things. It is through (or should be) hard, tough, realistic training. The Martial training leads and shapes the character development...not the other way around.

We should not mold the training to the precieved "ethics" or the philosophy that we want to achieve. That is what I think we do wrong in aikido.

We somehow start to look at particular styles, training, and techniques as somehow being more or less ethical than others. Dangerous cause we start discarding stuff that we think does not fit.

Character can be developed through other practices and stuff. Boy Scouts, Dharma Groups, Yoga, Church, community work....whatever you want to do.

You can certainly live a very wholesome, spiritual and ethical life without ever setting foot in a dojo.

There is something special about what we do in Aikido and Budo and that is we study violence. We need to come to grips with this subject and understand it. The power of it to control us and our world, and how we can best go about skillfully controlling it within ourselves and others around us.

So, yes, I think discussing Character Development is a very good topic!

Thanks for your post David!

 
Old 08-17-2009, 03:13 PM   #109
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
And that might have flown, in a naive kind of way, if he hadn't also declared that all the talk of internal mechanics is a fad and unrelated to "true" internal strength. And it just got worse from there.
Well I definately think a person should be ready for a variety of replies whenever they start talking about "true-such-and-such," but I figured it was a rhetorical device...kind of like saying there's absolutely no aiki in aikido today.
In terms of a sudden swell of popularity, I can see why someone might call the internal mechanics issues as being a fad, but I think you could say that about other aspects of Aikido at different times too. The Beatles were a fad, but they're still perfectly valid.

Last edited by mathewjgano : 08-17-2009 at 03:20 PM.

Gambarimashyo!
 
Old 08-17-2009, 03:19 PM   #110
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Re: True Internal Strength

You may be right about Phillip's actions on this topic...I try hard to take things at face value...sometimes a little too hard maybe.

Gambarimashyo!
 
Old 08-17-2009, 03:28 PM   #111
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
Well I definately think a person should be ready for a variety of replies whenever they start talking about "true-such-and-such," but I figured it was a rhetorical device...kind of like saying there's absolutely no aiki in aikido today.
In terms of a sudden swell of popularity, I can see why someone might call the internal mechanics issues as being a fad, but I think you could say that about other aspects of Aikido at different times too. The Beatles were a fad, but they're still perfectly valid.
You mean like saying "HI...Jack" on an airplane?

 
Old 08-17-2009, 03:40 PM   #112
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Re: True Internal Strength

Long ago I lived in Haight-Ashbury and played guitar in a bar while I explored life among the Flower Children (aka "Hippies"). The one major aspect that has always stuck with me was the number of FC's who did a lot of talking about "spiritual", "personal development", and all that while it wasn't hard for anyone with common sense to spot that a lot of the "spiritual" talk was really self-serving and a sort of affected role ... of the "Look At Me" variety.

I've met some pretty spiritual people in my life, but none of them talked about it a lot and didn't go out of their way to use a lot of spiritual buzzwords all the time. Cultivating oneself probably doesn't have a lot to do with buzzword-utility.

YMMV

Mike
 
Old 08-17-2009, 03:55 PM   #113
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Re: True Internal Strength

Thanks Ron and Kevin.

Kevin, you write:

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
****

There is something special about what we do in Aikido and Budo and that is we study violence. We need to come to grips with this subject and understand it. The power of it to control us and our world, and how we can best go about skillfully controlling it within ourselves and others around us.
Of the many points you made to which I am largely in agreement, this one may be the most fundamental point for me. I think it puts into bold perspective the distinctive opening Budo provides for self-exploration, self-understanding, and growth. If we enter.

Best,
David
 
Old 08-17-2009, 04:04 PM   #114
Marc Abrams
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
Well I definately think a person should be ready for a variety of replies whenever they start talking about "true-such-and-such," but I figured it was a rhetorical device...kind of like saying there's absolutely no aiki in aikido today.
In terms of a sudden swell of popularity, I can see why someone might call the internal mechanics issues as being a fad, but I think you could say that about other aspects of Aikido at different times too. The Beatles were a fad, but they're still perfectly valid.
Matthew:

I think that people have sought to delineate between the person and the ideas being discussed. A person who has put many hard years of work into something (eg. Dan & Mike) can speak from experience about the differences in ideas, philosophies, etc.. When a person who either assumes or pretends to have knowledge, when it is clear that he/she does not, posits self-serving questions, then that is an entirely different situation all together.

For example, the individual members of the Beatles were all musicians who put their time into their craft BEFORE being recognized by the public at large.

Character development is important, and is associated with DO. The hard work that is involved in changing the person helps to create the conditions that lead to that type of character development. Those that assume that they experience "character development" in absence of the hard work typically become evident to others when they are suddenly and unexpectedly confronted with a real conflict. It is akin to one of my "Marcisms" in my other job: "The strength of a relationship is not really seen in how well two people get along, but in how well they fight." In unexpected and/or heated conflicts, true natures tend to emerge. Many times it is not what we want to see in ourselves, but it is what we need to see in ourselves in order to realize real change. That takes a lot of hard work in any venue.

Marc Abrams
 
Old 08-17-2009, 04:06 PM   #115
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Re: True Internal Strength

Playing a bit of devil's advocate for the sake of furthering the conversation (i.e. my understanding of things):

Quote:
David Henderson wrote: View Post
I think it isn't plausible to look at this thread just in terms of an affirmative meaning of "internal strength."

Rather, it is clearly a reaction to proponents of IT methods, as it defines "true internal strength" expressly by distinguishing "TIS" from "IT" (a/k/a, "not-true internal strength," or "NTIS.")

Reading the OP makes it abundantly clear the writer's appropriation of a well-established term of art, "internal strength," to talk about "character development," and the elevation of the later as the posited "true" [i.e., deeper, more profound, and more valuable] purpose of aikido training is simultaneously a way of disparaging the importance of IT ("NTIS") as it normally is understood:
You may be right. I didn't read it that way. I read it as being a spin-off title, but not a contradiction to the idea that internal skills are important. Although, based on the idea that O Sensei didn't care if his students got "it" wouldn't it seem debatable to suggest that character development is more important than "it"?

Quote:
1. Isn't martial effectiveness of prime concern to any serious follower of a "martial path," even if that person practices for the "-do" rather than just to master the "jutsu?"
I suppose that depends on what you mean by prime. I mean, I certainly don't want to get worse at it; I want to get better, but I can also get behind the idea that lesson content isn't always the primary lesson itself.

Quote:
2. What factual basis exists to suggest that internal strength training is somehow contrary to character development in a martial art, much less an exercise in violence?
Is this the same issue as brought forth by the "does seeking power impair aiki" thread? Considering the amount of dedication internal development requires, I'm inclined to think it's more prone toward character building than not.

Quote:
3. Should someone truly committed to self-transformation through a martial practice restrict their point of view, their experience, and their training, apparently based on pride and/or loyalty?
There was more to the purpose expressed than pride and loyalty wasn't there?

Quote:
4. Is it consistent with the ideals of traditional Aikido to enter into an interaction -- even a virtual one -- that is laden with overtones of conflict, obtain the predictable reaction, and then effectively withhold one's center from the interaction (i.e., act as though the other person is just confused or overly sensitive)?
Certainly not.

Quote:
But in my view it's no accident that these posts both have spun off of the OP, and its no misperception that the OP takes a shot -- gratuitously, to my way of thinking -- at "IT."
Well I hope it wasn't a shot at "It," and those who are interested in it. I think people should respect the fact that different people hold different values in different proportions.
Anyhoo, my two bits.
Take care,
Matthew

Gambarimashyo!
 
Old 08-17-2009, 04:55 PM   #116
mathewjgano
 
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Re: True Internal Strength

FWIW...
Quote:
Marc Abrams wrote: View Post
Matthew:

I think that people have sought to delineate between the person and the ideas being discussed.
I'm not sure I understand what you mean here. Would you be willing to paraphrase it?

Quote:
When a person who either assumes or pretends to have knowledge, when it is clear that he/she does not, posits self-serving questions...
From the objective standpoint that people with first-hand knowledge of something are truer authoritties than those who haven't understanding (or less understanding), then, yes there is greater validity to their words. From the subjective standpoint of someone like me who cannot always tell the difference, all we have are the words themselves...and to me the questions don't seem self-serving because they leave it to others to rebut: everyone says what they think and the conversation goes on until it's no longer interesting/entertaining. If the questions are just veiled means of expressing an opinion, it still leaves it to others to disagree. I guess I don't see a problem with people expressing potentially ignorant opinions...even doggedly or indirectly. And really, do the opinions of the ignorant (such as myself) weigh that much?

Quote:
Those that assume that they experience "character development" in absence of the hard work typically become evident to others when they are suddenly and unexpectedly confronted with a real conflict.
I agree that people who look for the easy excuse are not helping themselves AND are setting themselves up for bigger problems. I also would agree it's easy to sit in front of a computer and lay down line after line and feel like they've done more to contribute to their understanding of aikido than they actually have. I know I've been guilty of that.

Quote:
"The strength of a relationship is not really seen in how well two people get along, but in how well they fight." In unexpected and/or heated conflicts, true natures tend to emerge.
I would disagree, but I'd really just be getting into semantics; I think I agree with the essence of your meaning here.

Quote:
Many times it is not what we want to see in ourselves, but it is what we need to see in ourselves in order to realize real change. That takes a lot of hard work in any venue.

Marc Abrams
Amen to that, brother!

Gambarimashyo!
 
Old 08-17-2009, 05:09 PM   #117
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Re: True Internal Strength

Hi Matthew.

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
Playing a bit of devil's advocate for the sake of furthering the conversation (i.e. my understanding of things)
"Friend of the devil is a friend of mine," as the song goes. I'm happy to let you know my point of view, as long as you understand my limited expertise.

Quote:
....Based on the idea that O Sensei didn't care if his students got "it" wouldn't it seem debatable to suggest that character development is more important than "it"?
I'm not sure the record is clear enough for a categorical statement about O'Sensei and his students, and my impression is that what he taught and how he taught differed not only over time but depending on where he was teaching/demonstrating.

Speaking for myself, I still say your question mixes processes and end-states in a way that suggests false choices.

Quote:
I suppose that depends on what you mean by prime. I certainly don't want to get worse at it; I want to get better, but I can also get behind the idea that lesson content isn't always the primary lesson itself.
Yet when I think about those other "lessons," they still depend, in my view, on Aikido as martially effective

Take something as mundane as yonkyo, as traditionally practiced. I've seen men and women struggle with their pain reaction to the point of being emotionally overwhelmed in the moment. It's what they do with the reaction that then matters, in terms of -Do.

Affirming the one at the expense of the other just seems foolish and false to me.

Quote:
Is this the same issue as brought forth by the "does seeking power impair aiki" thread? .
Erick should address that, if anyone. I think they are related but not the same. This one might be, "does seeking power impair -do?"

Quote:
Considering the amount of dedication internal development requires, I'm inclined to think it's more prone toward character building than not
I'm inclined to agree. IT seems aimed at development of an ability to become and stay both self-aware and connected in a profound physical way in the midst of physical conflict. Surely there is alot there to contemplate for those so inclined.

Quote:
There was more to the purpose expressed than pride and loyalty wasn't there?
OK, such as? In any event whatever mix of motives lies behind the decision to have a closed mind, you still end up with a closed mind, no?

Quote:
Well I hope it wasn't a shot at "It," and those who are interested in it. I think people should respect the fact that different people hold different values in different proportions
.

Matthew, you are a kind soul.

Quote:
Take care,
Matthew
You too.

David
 
Old 08-17-2009, 09:41 PM   #118
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
David Orange wrote: View Post
And that might have flown, in a naive kind of way, if he hadn't also declared that all the talk of internal mechanics is a fad and unrelated to "true" internal strength. And it just got worse from there.

David
Main Entry: fad
Pronunciation: \ˈfad\
Function: noun
Etymology: origin unknown
Date: 1867
: a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal : craze

Main Entry: zeal
Pronunciation: \ˈzēl\
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English zele, from Late Latin zelus, from Greek zēlos
Date: 14th century
: eagerness and ardent interest in pursuit of something : fervor <her zeal to succeed strained her relationships>

synonyms see passion



Main Entry: craze
Pronunciation: \ˈkrāz\
Function: verb
Inflected Form(s): crazed; craz·ing
Etymology: Middle English crasen to crush, craze, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish krasa to crush
Date: 14th century
transitive verb
1 obsolete : break, shatter
2 : to produce minute cracks on the surface or glaze of <crazed glass>
3 : to make insane or as if insane <crazed by pain and fear>
intransitive verb
1 archaic : shatter, break
2 : to become insane
3 : to develop a mesh of fine cracks

Last edited by Buck : 08-17-2009 at 09:52 PM.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 09:57 PM   #119
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: True Internal Strength

Buck, what is your point? Please if you will summarize and make a point other than simply cutting and pasting examples of thing that other folks right, or from another authority.

The purpose of boards is to synthesize facts and concepts into statements or arguments. You use authorities or facts such as the above to support those facts.

I think we have covered the subject that you believe that Internal strength as a "Craze or a Fad" or that folks have a Zeal for it that is somewhat a fanatical. Got it that is your opinion and you are entitled to it.

You also go on to declare what O'Sensei's true purpose of Aikido was.

I asked you several days ago for you to establish the basis for the statement. What books you've read, who you talked to, studied with or any number of sources that have led you to form this conclusion.

I am not even saying that you are wrong. Heck, I for one go on record as saying I really do not know what O'Sensei wanted or intended in AIkido at all!

I can only interpret what I learn from others that have more experience than I.

So, when someone makes such a declarative statement, I really honestly want to know.

I only know what my Instructors tell me. One, that studied directly with him and many that are the senior students (second/third generation) and they tell me a consistent message....so that is all I have to go on!

If you have more info I am all ears.

 
Old 08-17-2009, 10:50 PM   #120
Buck
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Re: True Internal Strength

By providing the defination, of "Fad" I hope that cleared it up.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 10:55 PM   #121
Lorel Latorilla
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Re: True Internal Strength

troll on a roll, yeah! troll on a roll....on a roll, on a roll.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 11:00 PM   #122
gdandscompserv
 
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Re: True Internal Strength

 
Old 08-17-2009, 11:56 PM   #123
Buck
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Re: True Internal Strength

Since so many people of late I feel are having trouble with this thread. I would like to post what started this thread. Which is in my first post here responding to Rob.

I was trying to explain to Rob, not argue as so many like to do, either formally or not. I am not into to that. But I have realize that some people here no matter how much you or others try to explain something will, or try and avoid an unproductive argument will always be resistant. That is fine. It is my philosophy that the beauty of the net is you just don't have read something you don't agree on.

I understand those who argue passionately about something, and that fire comes throughout the posts. If it isn't directed personally a someone and it is still on topic.

But because this thread has taken a shape I didn't intend it to be, which is fine, I am not in to control, and I am not sensitive about these things. Hey I respect the freedom of speech, and feel everyone should voice their opinion (if it isn't done in a way that it brakes the rules here). I am not going to shut down, condemn, harass, get my ego hurt, and that kind of stuff, because of someone's post that I didn't like what they say. Or because I disagree. I am not that kind of person. Though, I may tell you what I think, passionately, but take it FWIW. I am not out to change the world, or what ever.

It may upset people that I am a dedicated Aikidoka who has decided to focus strictly on O'Sensei and how he seen Aikido. That I am dedicated to Aikido, and feel Aikido is great art that has helped. But I am not going to apologize for that. Nor do I care, if that offends some people who don't have the same constitution, devotion, or love of Aikido. Or that don't look at Aikido as highly as other arts they do. Yes, I will defend Aikido, but it will be done in a civil manner like I just did. All without personal attacks, and stuff. That isn't my way, or do I feel is my Aikido way. I don't need to fight from a keyboard or not. Being defensive doesn't you have to be belligerent, confrontational, and stuff. Exercising internal strength, the stuff that is taught in Aikido and other true martial arts is a refection of character. Yes, character means not being belligerent, confrontaional, and stuff. It means being civil,doesn't it. That is why I like Aikido, it teaches to civility, and good character in words and deeds.

Here is the original post that the first post I quoted Rob that started the thread. I did so because it was OT.

I hope what is see is the complexity
Quote:
Philip Burgess (in Aikido My Way thread) wrote: I have realized Aikido is about personal character, it is about people being better and refraining from violence on its most understandable level. It isn't about injecting it with the latest fad martial art or what not to make it better, more effective. That is the very shallowest level of Aikido, I had realized early on. If I was to over-come past and future bullies I first must over-come myself.

These types of things are always over-looked when someone offers a new "customization, enhancement, or retro fit" to Aikido. It shouldn't be that way, IT shouldn't be over-looked. That is the heart, and soul of Aikido is character, personal change and growth. There lays the strength and power of Aikido, knowing violence is the struggle for control. Violence means not having control. Where as peace is control. Aikido is about control.
If you went back to the original post and referenced though all the responses you will see Rob presented a very complex thing. I responded the best way I knew. And I have made reasonable attempts and made apologies early on, to clarify anything hurt feelings, misunderstandings,infringed on others territory, or toes stepped on. All of which for some reason hasn't an effect, and ignored, and I expect that to continue. All of which reinforces my personal belief that all I can do is present my opinon, and refrain from discussing things. I really don't like to argue, for me it to discuss opinions on topics. Now, like I said I will just present opinions, and make clarifications when needed.

FWIAW.


Last edited by Buck : 08-18-2009 at 12:09 AM.
 
Old 08-18-2009, 12:11 AM   #124
Tim Fong
 
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Lorel Latorilla wrote: View Post
Ha! You know me, trolls and gyaru and interchangeable. On the other hand, college onee-kei and filipino-american girlz...hmmmm.
Shoot, son. You oughta move to the Bay then. You can kick it with Fil-Am females, bang at an mma gym and meet up with folks to work your internal skills. I also hear that there are a few cats who can teach you how to swing a pinuti.
 
Old 08-18-2009, 12:26 AM   #125
Buck
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Re: True Internal Strength

Quote:
Philip Burgess wrote: View Post
It may upset people that I am a dedicated Aikidoka who has decided to focus strictly on O'Sensei and how he seen Aikido.

This means I love Aikido, if I didn't I would be dedicated to it. I am dedicated to Aikido with all its flaws, and warts, its imperfections. Many people interpret Aikido to a wide range of ways. Some of the ways I disagree- my opinion. And because there is so many different perspectives that range from one extreme to another, some of which I subscribed to. I feel now, because of that, it is best for me to focus on what O'Sensei intended Aikido to be to the my best of my understanding and ability. If that is upsetting to some who feel Aikido is flawed or incomplete or dedicated to a different view, I am sorry, but there is no apologize coming. I am not going to apologize for being commited and dedicated, for working hard at, and not giving up on Aikido.

I hope those who feel different will find what they are looking for and that will bring them great happiness.

Last edited by Buck : 08-18-2009 at 12:29 AM.
 

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