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Old 02-28-2002, 03:32 AM   #1
CraigJamieson
Dojo: Ki Federation of GB
Location: East Kilbride, Scotland
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 10
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Freaky! muay thai

im considering starting training in muay thai boxing. Purely for a good aerobic workout, and the chance to learn how to strike properly. But im slightly worried that it may hinder my progress in aikido, although it could also help it to develop. Is there anyone out there who cross trains in muay thai and aikido?? How have you found it? Id really appreciate any feedback. Cheers. Craig
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Old 02-28-2002, 10:08 AM   #2
Lyle Bogin
Dojo: Shin Budo Kai
Location: Manhattan
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 588
United_States
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The benefits from my experience with muay thai are:

1- Ability to abosorb and control pressure, fatigue, and pain.

2- A realistic understading of the dangers, pros, and cons of strikes and clinching.

3- A great cardio workout.

I don't see how cross training in the techniques could hurt you, but be careful with your knees. Your shins will be bruised often and will need to be massaged. If you study muay thai, I think you will be able to absorb a very useful perspective that will enhance your aikido. But you may need recovery time which can cut into your aikido training schedule.

Good luck!
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Old 02-28-2002, 10:49 AM   #3
Edward
Location: Bangkok
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 803
Thailand
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Well, guys, I live in Thailand and over here Muay Thai is a very serious matter. It's a dangerous and lethal sport. That's why there are almost no amateurs. People who take it up want to make a living, money out of it. I can't think of a reason to take violent fist, elbow, knee, foot blows on your head and other parts of your body other than that. Personally I don't think it's fun (I've done it when I was 16 and my parents forced me to quit when they saw the state I was in when I came back home). Just think about the brain damage. You wanna become like Mohammed Ali?

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 02-28-2002, 10:51 AM   #4
ian
 
ian's Avatar
Dojo: University of Ulster, Coleriane
Location: Northern Ireland
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 1,654
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I definately think it is good to be aware of strikes when doing aikido. I think we often train so much in the technique side of aikido that we forget that the reason we need specific distancing and atemis is because both sides are capable of striking!

However, as a sensei has said to me previously, there is no point in doing a self-defence if it's you causing all the damage on yourself.

Ian
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Old 02-28-2002, 02:27 PM   #5
Lyle Bogin
Dojo: Shin Budo Kai
Location: Manhattan
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 588
United_States
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Most Thai Boxers when they come to the United States are very retired, and offer classes that are less brutal than professional training (a fighter past his prime in Thailand is still more dangerous than a fighter from the US in his prime). Ofcourse, that dangerous level of training is available, but most Thai Boxing schools offer modified classes that teach the techniques with less sparring, heavy protective gear, and more pad work and drilling. When I was Thai Boxing, noone ever hit me clean in the head with an elbow (which I belive is the most dangerous strike).

You should be able to seek training that is much more moderate. But it is still Muay Thai, and it's always going to be rough.
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Old 02-28-2002, 03:23 PM   #6
deepsoup
Dojo: Sheffield Shodokan Dojo
Location: Sheffield, UK
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 524
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Quote:
Originally posted by Edward
Just think about the brain damage. You wanna become like Mohammed Ali?
I take your point, but I'm not sure Ali is the best example. Because:

a) He is not punch-drunk, he has Parkinson's disease. Maybe one of the medical people will correct me, but I dont think there is necesarily a causal link with boxing in his case. (Besides which, Ali was difficult to hit, thats why he stayed so pretty! )

b) If I could become like Mohammed Ali. If I could have his skill, his courage and his charisma and then drop dead ten years from now... I'm there, no hesitation whatsoever!

Sean
x
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Old 02-28-2002, 09:03 PM   #7
Arianah
Dojo: Aikido of Norwalk
Location: CT
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 205
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Quote:
Originally posted by deepsoup
a) He is not punch-drunk, he has Parkinson's disease.
I thought he had a Parkison's-like disease.
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Old 02-28-2002, 10:19 PM   #8
Largo
Dojo: Aikikai Dobunkan/ Icho Ryu Aikijujutsu
Location: Indiana
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 247
United_States
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Well... I used to do Muay Thai, along with some other stuff. It's tough to beat...it's fun, good for stress, and great exercise.
However, it is completely different from aikido. One of the goals of repetitive training is to ingrain skills until they are done unconsciously. Kind of like walking...we really don`t have to think much about it because we've done it for so long.
That being said, I do believe in cross training. Part of it is that I love learning something new, part of it is the "know your enemy" bit. If you like it, go for it...but muay thai training is the toughest I have ever done. It's not as complicated as Aikido or silat...but it makes HUGE demands on your body.
So...Good luck
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Old 03-01-2002, 03:30 AM   #9
andrew
Dojo: NUI, Galway Aikido Club.
Location: Galway, Ireland.
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 334
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Quote:
Originally posted by deepsoup


I take your point, but I'm not sure Ali is the best example. Because:

a) He is not punch-drunk, he has Parkinson's disease. Maybe one of the medical people will correct me, but I dont think there is necesarily a causal link with boxing in his case. (Besides which, Ali was difficult to hit, thats why he stayed so pretty! )
Ali does have Parkinsons, but a lot of people think it might be related to the beatings he took.
Towards the end of his career, he won fights by letting the other guy wear himself out punching, so he did take a lot of punishment.

andrew
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Old 03-25-2002, 03:37 AM   #10
aries admin
Dojo: Aikikai Philippines
Location: Philippines
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 34
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Hard and Soft martial arts

Hi:

I guess the difference is in its approach. Muay Thai are are hard meaning you have to contract your muscles in order to execute correctly while in Aikido you have to relax. If you try practicing for some time in Muay Thai you will realize that your movements during Randori is slower or stiff. There people of course that can do both without much difficulty but a seasoned practioner would easily notice that they are using their force rather than the other way around.

CHEERS!
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