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Old 12-11-2008, 08:25 AM   #26
Amadeus
Dojo: Arendal Aikido
Location: Arendal
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 20
Norway
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Carolyn Parkinson wrote: View Post
My friend is a very self-reliant type, and has aversions to therapy for very legitimate reasons. My initial, and continued, approach is to try to convince my friend that therapy is the best option, and necessary.
Hi Carrie.
Some depressions can have it's up and downs. At the downs the individual can be to passivisated by the disease to take the action needed to get help. At the ups the person might belive she don't need help because she's getting better. Getting professional help ain't as easy as it can seem for someone who's never been there.

A depression can be hard to explain, so the idea of explaining the condition to a professional can be frightening enough. Maybe bringing a friend or a family member for moral support could help?

Another problem can be accepting the disease. By talking to a professional you admit there is something wrong, and there is no way back: you are depressed. Can't just "shake it off" anymore, some dude who know everything just said you got a mental disorder. You are nuts ect. The stigma should not go unnoticed.

I'm way off topic...

Love me, hate me, tolerate me or ignore me. I care!
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Old 12-11-2008, 06:43 PM   #27
jennifer paige smith
 
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Dojo: Confluence Aiki-Dojo / Santa Cruz Sword Club
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Carolyn Parkinson wrote: View Post
Like meditation can sometimes bring the benefits of relaxation and lowered stress levels and blood pressure, but it should be done for its own sake, not for its purported health benefits.
exac-a-tack-ly

Jennifer Paige Smith
Confluence Aikido Systems
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Old 12-13-2008, 03:57 AM   #28
Stefan Hultberg
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 24
Denmark
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Hi

"Like meditation can sometimes bring the benefits of relaxation and lowered stress levels and blood pressure, but it should be done for its own sake, not for its purported health benefits."

Why shouldn't it? I agree that meditation (for example) is a wonderful activity and should often be carried out "for its own sake", but why shouldn't one do it for the (purported) health benefits?? I enjoy aikido and I think I practice it "for its own sake", but I'm pretty happy about its physical and mental health benefits too!! Why shouldn't I be?

All the best

Stefan Hultberg
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Old 12-13-2008, 05:29 PM   #29
aikishrine
Dojo: aikido of central new york
Location: syracuse,ny
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 143
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Hi,

I suffer from a severe Bi-polar disorder.
I take medication, plus i see both a psychiatrist and a psychologist
for psychotherapy. Both are helpful. However i get a lot out of my Aikido training that also helps me emotionaly. That being said it is very hard to get myself to the dojo at times, and when i do go it is sometimes very hard to get on the mat, but when i do get on the mat my spirits are lifted beyond compare, but that is a personal thing and should in know way be a diagnosis for someone else. Nor should anyone try to diagnose training as a cureall because it isnt right for eveyone and can actualy add to the frustration of your psyche, i have experienced this as well when people say just get on the mat and all will be better, but i will leave you with this "give it a try. because it cant hurt"

just my two cents
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Old 12-14-2008, 09:26 AM   #30
jennifer paige smith
 
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Stefan Hultberg wrote: View Post
Hi

"Like meditation can sometimes bring the benefits of relaxation and lowered stress levels and blood pressure, but it should be done for its own sake, not for its purported health benefits."

Why shouldn't it? I agree that meditation (for example) is a wonderful activity and should often be carried out "for its own sake", but why shouldn't one do it for the (purported) health benefits?? I enjoy aikido and I think I practice it "for its own sake", but I'm pretty happy about its physical and mental health benefits too!! Why shouldn't I be?

All the best

Stefan Hultberg
I believe the idea here is that if one decides what something is about, or for , before even beginning the practice you'll miss out on what the practice has to offer independently. It will simply be a projection of self and not an entity unto its own.
Enjoying the by-products of practice is awesome. Deciding what they'll be before you start is something else.

Jennifer Paige Smith
Confluence Aikido Systems
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Old 12-14-2008, 10:35 AM   #31
Stefan Hultberg
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Jennifer Smith wrote: View Post
I believe the idea here is that if one decides what something is about, or for , before even beginning the practice you'll miss out on what the practice has to offer independently. It will simply be a projection of self and not an entity unto its own.
Enjoying the by-products of practice is awesome. Deciding what they'll be before you start is something else.
Hi

Amen, expectations & preconceived ideas bind reality rather than letting reality flow more freely into something that can be more wondrous than anything one's expectations can imagine.

I do enjoy the by-products though, especially the stretching of my stiff old arms!!

Stefan Hultberg
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Old 12-14-2008, 11:12 AM   #32
GeneC
Location: Henderson,
Join Date: Nov 2008
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

What difference does it make why a person comes to a practice. Isn't possible that they discover the "purpose" (by who's decree?) on they way?

I came to Aikido in a "round about way" ( from the hospital for heart attack, my cardiologist told me I either learn to calm down or start making funeral arrangements), so the day I was released I went and joined a T'ai Ch'i class and an Aikido class, as both demand relaxation and calmness in order to be effective. So tell me, what IS the purpose of Aikido? IS it a sin that I didn't come to Aikido to become one with Osensei's spirit and discover the secrets of the Universe? Maybe I'll evolve to that later(and maybe not). What difference does it make?

Only between a single breath is Yin/Yang in harmony
Emotion is pure energy flowing feely thru the body-Dan Millman
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Old 12-14-2008, 11:22 AM   #33
GeneC
Location: Henderson,
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Stefan Hultberg wrote: View Post
Hi

Amen, expectations & preconceived ideas bind reality rather than letting reality flow more freely into something that can be more wondrous than anything one's expectations can imagine.

I do enjoy the by-products though, especially the stretching of my stiff old arms!!

Stefan Hultberg
No offense, but I think this attitude sells new folks short, implying that it's not possible for them to open up to other ideas from fellow students, the Sensei, Sempai and just being there and discovering Budo, et al, along the way..

Only between a single breath is Yin/Yang in harmony
Emotion is pure energy flowing feely thru the body-Dan Millman
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Old 12-14-2008, 12:57 PM   #34
Sy Labthavikul
Dojo: Aikido Academy USA of Alhambra
Location: Los Angeles area, CA
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 98
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Stefan Hultberg wrote: View Post
Hi

Amen, expectations & preconceived ideas bind reality rather than letting reality flow more freely into something that can be more wondrous than anything one's expectations can imagine.
Isn't this a preconceived idea itself?


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Old 12-14-2008, 01:22 PM   #35
jennifer paige smith
 
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Clarence Couch wrote: View Post
No offense, but I think this attitude sells new folks short, implying that it's not possible for them to open up to other ideas from fellow students, the Sensei, Sempai and just being there and discovering Budo, et al, along the way..
I don't see a contradiction. In fact, that was exactly my experience.

Jennifer Paige Smith
Confluence Aikido Systems
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Old 12-15-2008, 11:30 AM   #36
Stefan Hultberg
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 24
Denmark
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Re: Using martial arts as depression therapy?

Quote:
Clarence Couch wrote: View Post
No offense, but I think this attitude sells new folks short, implying that it's not possible for them to open up to other ideas from fellow students, the Sensei, Sempai and just being there and discovering Budo, et al, along the way..
Hi

Well, I find it difficult to know clearly what exactly my attitude is toward many things. Know this, though - I agree with you completely in that one should "open up to other ideas from fellow students, the Sensei, Sempai and just being there and discovering Budo, et al, along the way" and I believe most people actually do this.

Many regards

Stefan Hultberg
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