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Old 01-24-2009, 02:22 PM   #201
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
It'll be interesting to see what they conclude, particularly since Chinese and Japanese "internal" practitioners have intuitively known and exploited these factors for centuries.
"Intuitively"??? I would disagree. And of course there are a lot of "internal" Asian practitioners that don't have the skills, so the "intuitive" part doesn't work.

Without taking the time to write a long dissertation ("thank god", she says), I'd offer the opinion that "these things are not intuitive but must be learned"... a comment I swiped from Yang Cheng Fu.

Mike
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Old 01-24-2009, 03:41 PM   #202
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
I think I wrote some sort of similar explanation on A.W. a few years ago, but I have no idea where it is. I can give you a *rough* idea, but let me emphasize that it's an incomplete idea and there's more to it:

Stand upright, feet about shoulder or a little-more width. Let a partner push into (and very slightly downward) your right should and you try to relax, let the left leg compress from the push, and the left foot should be the resting place for the push. Naturally the body "structure" is what conveys the push down to the foot, but in this case the "structure" is standing in for something I can't tell you quite how to do in writing.

Then have the partner stop pushing and walk around and push on the left should, all the same thing, etc., so that the push winds up in the right foot. Try not to move any part of your body in between the pushes. Just first accept the push into the left foot from the right shoulder and then accept the push into the right foot from the left shoulder. You can feel that there has to be a minor re-arrangement inside the body to accomodate the force coming from the different directions and you kind of "set up" in order get ready for the push from different sides. That "setting up" is done via "intention". If you learn to hit, push, receive-forces, manipulate, etc., this kind of intention path of strength to and from the ground, your skills will increase. But since you don't have to move to do these intention changes, there really is no "shape". I can lay on the ground and mentally change where and what direction forces are going through my body. I can lean over into odd positions and manipulate these same kinds of forces. So it's not "shape"; it's intention.

When Ueshiba let the Sumo wrestler push on him, Ueshiba responded by meeting the Sumo wrestler's force with a force that Ueshiba arranged mentally. That force "blended" with the Sumo wrestler's push and negated the push. So Ueshiba used the "Divine Will"... and he called it the secret of Aikido. Of course other arts use these force/ki/kokyu/jin skill manipulations, too, as part of "blending", hitting (atemi), and so on. There are more extensive discussions about these skills on QiJin, if the above didn't answer your questions.

FWIW

Mike
Thank you Mike.
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Old 01-24-2009, 03:43 PM   #203
Cady Goldfield
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Mike,
I don't know whether Chinese (and other) practitioners hundreds or thousands of years ago had the means by which to view myoneural cells within fascia to see them firing electrochemically. Lacking that medical/scientific technology, I attributed their understanding to an "intuitive" one perhaps augmented by the visual knowledge of the human body they had. If Western science has been dissecting human cadavers for centuries now, without understanding the role of fascia until fairly recently, I have to wonder how much greater an advance Chinese physiological knowledge had over 1,000 years ago? And even more so, the ability to make a connection between "intent" and the firing of fascia cells to effect movement in advance of muscle action? I think crediting the Chinese with empirical knowledge 1,000 years ago is a bit of a stretch (pardon the play on words).

And why is "intuition" somehow looked down upon as an inferior sense (recall how "women's intuition" was viewed condescendingly in bygone days), rather than as a form of intelligence that simply isn't represented by forms of cognition that are "verbal" -- something the Western mind tends to value ("I THINK... therefore, I must know something..." )

In the absence of cognitively analyzed data, intuition was often the chief form of intelligence that allowed human beings to discover and utilize many resources that might otherwise have been unreachable. Give it some credit.

Last edited by Cady Goldfield : 01-24-2009 at 03:47 PM.
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Old 01-24-2009, 04:52 PM   #204
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
I don't know whether Chinese (and other) practitioners hundreds or thousands of years ago had the means by which to view myoneural cells within fascia to see them firing electrochemically. Lacking that medical/scientific technology, I attributed their understanding to an "intuitive" one perhaps augmented by the visual knowledge of the human body they had.
Hi Cady:

Well, I see where you're going and I simply disagree. I think it's fairly obvious (in hindsight; I've been doing this a long time, though) that what happened was empirical. There was no need to have some sage-like intuition about cellular activity; what they observed was physical and if you focus where they almost undoubtedly focused, you'd see it, too. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to attribute all of this to lost ancient wisdom or even a sprinkling of body-technology delivered by aliens to the lost kingdom of WatdaFu, but I think it's much simpler than that.
Quote:
If Western science has been dissecting human cadavers for centuries now, without understanding the role of fascia until fairly recently, I have to wonder how much greater an advance Chinese physiological knowledge had over 1,000 years ago? And even more so, the ability to make a connection between "intent" and the firing of fascia cells to effect movement in advance of muscle action? I think crediting the Chinese with empirical knowledge 1,000 years ago is a bit of a stretch (pardon the play on words).
Yeah, I don't have any problem with seeing what you're trying to say, I just think that you're looking in the wrong direction. But since that's an O.T. tangent, I won't go there (or even tip my hand. ).
Quote:
And why is "intuition" somehow looked down upon as an inferior sense (recall how "women's intuition" was viewed condescendingly in bygone days), rather than as a form of intelligence that simply isn't represented by forms of cognition that are "verbal" -- something the Western mind tends to value ("I THINK... therefore, I must know something..." )

In the absence of cognitively analyzed data, intuition was often the chief form of intelligence that allowed human beings to discover and utilize many resources that might otherwise have been unreachable. Give it some credit.
Er.... I didn't attack the idea of "intuition", Cady. At least I don't think I did. I dunno... I used to be indecisive about what "intuition" meant, but now I'm not so sure. Cogito, ergo curro.

Mike
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Old 01-24-2009, 05:45 PM   #205
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

At some point in the movie (the one the thread is talking about originally) that guy punched in the AIR (in front of a uke's face) and that uke did a front ukemi screaming in pain.

I was like mm okayyyyy...!

KI or not. that was just blunt!

A good stance and posture reflects a proper state of mind
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Old 01-24-2009, 07:51 PM   #206
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Stand upright, feet about shoulder or a little-more width. Let a partner push into (and very slightly downward) your right should and you try to relax, let the left leg compress from the push, and the left foot should be the resting place for the push. Naturally the body "structure" is what conveys the push down to the foot, but in this case the "structure" is standing in for something I can't tell you quite how to do in writing.

Then have the partner stop pushing and walk around and push on the left should, all the same thing, etc., so that the push winds up in the right foot. Try not to move any part of your body in between the pushes. Just first accept the push into the left foot from the right shoulder and then accept the push into the right foot from the left shoulder. You can feel that there has to be a minor re-arrangement inside the body to accomodate the force coming from the different directions and you kind of "set up" in order get ready for the push from different sides. That "setting up" is done via "intention".
Hi Mike,

Would you say what you describe is what Mr. Chen Xiaowang calls "All Sided Support" in this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J85ARLul9h8

All the best,
/Steven
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:12 PM   #207
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Steven Resell wrote: View Post
Hi Mike,

Would you say what you describe is what Mr. Chen Xiaowang calls "All Sided Support" in this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J85ARLul9h8

All the best,
/Steven
Hi Steven:

Yes, it's the same thing. And of course the logic is pretty obvious that if your balance is constant then an opponent cannot do kuzushi and yet if your balance is always in equilibrium you can take the opponent's balance when he makes an error.

If you think about it, Tohei's "extend Ki" is the same thing. The principles of the ki/kokyu/qi/jin things were figured out long, long ago and codified. So long ago that all the theories of Yin and Yang, etc., have permeated all the Asian arts, often with pretty much the same wording in various arts throughout Asia. This is why you find the Yin-Yang, Five Elements, etc., etc., in all the Chinese and Japanese arts. If you look in Ueshiba's douka and other writings you can spot the Yin-Yang references, "Intent" (Divine Will), and so on, even though they've been modified to reflect the idea that they are Shinto precepts.

Best.

Mike
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:41 PM   #208
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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I just went back and looked at the video because something bothered me. At about 1:10 the translation suddenly says something about "breath" and it's pretty obviously out of place since CXW is not talking about breathing or breath. CXW is talking about "qi", but not in the "air" or "breath" sense, he's talking in the sense, I think, that keeping your "intention"/qi balanced in all directions is good for your health. In the same sense that Tohei conflates "extend ki"/"keep the one point" (these really boil down to the same thing) with someone's health. This is all part of the common theories and principles of qi/ki.

Sometimes CXW will say "balance in six directions"... he means not "balance" in the common usage but in the sense that the intention-strength is extended globally so that the body is in balance due to the ki/qi being in equilibrium in all directions. This form of "balance" is the essence of what standing postures for health are used for, BTW.

FWIW

Mike
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Old 01-25-2009, 01:45 AM   #209
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Mike,

All of it makes great sense. Now I just need to be able to do all of it... maybe in another five years.

Thanks for the further clarification on "breath" and "balance".

/Steven
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Old 01-26-2009, 08:28 AM   #210
Ron Tisdale
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Quote:
Sometimes CXW will say "balance in six directions"... he means not "balance" in the common usage but in the sense that the intention-strength is extended globally so that the body is in balance due to the ki/qi being in equilibrium in all directions. This form of "balance" is the essence of what standing postures for health are used for, BTW.
Hi Mike, is this the kind of "balance" you were referring to when we had that discussion about Gozo Shioda's book oh so many moons ago? If you can't remember, I'll search for a link by and by...

Best,
Ron

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Old 01-26-2009, 08:37 AM   #211
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Hi Mike, is this the kind of "balance" you were referring to when we had that discussion about Gozo Shioda's book oh so many moons ago? If you can't remember, I'll search for a link by and by...
I remember the discussion, Ron, at least vaguely. Remember that part of the problem was that the book wasn't really written by Shioda but by his students, giving their take on what Shioda was saying. The second problem is that the book was then translated by someone into English, and their understanding of various skills would have been crucial to how accurate the book was. But my guess is that the "balance" referred to in the Shioda book was more along the lines of what I was talking about. It wouldn't make a lot of sense if it was just about "balance" in the ordinary sense.

Besides, since I wrote that post(s) I've seen much more of the old Shioda stuff on vids and he definitely uses ki/kokyu skills. In fact, he seems to revel in "aiki" portions.

Best.

Mike
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Old 01-26-2009, 01:59 PM   #212
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Ah here is Peter Goldsbury's stab at a translation. Interesting how it melds nicely with the topic...

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...3&postcount=17
Best,
Ron

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Old 01-26-2009, 03:50 PM   #213
Mark Jakabcsin
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
So far, in regard to the best common example (Kuroda's video: the two tricks at the end) we haven't been able to hash out enough particulars for me to agree. Your comments about "precise posture" don't sound right to me because (as shown in Forrest Chang's "Simple Jin Tricks", stuff I do, stuff other people do, etc.) precise posture is not a real necessity for someone who has these skills. Heck, in the Kuroda video example where they're laying on the floor... that's a good example of how to use jin/groundstrength and not need a special posture.
Mike,
Would you argee that to learn the skills you describe and to build the intent one starts by learning precise posture? By working from a precise posture at the begining one can learn how things are connected in the body and how to connect the intent through the body. After one attains a degree of proficiency and understanding of this then he/she can begin to connect the intent regardless of posture. Do you agree with that as a valid starting poiint for training? If not please explain why and/or a better method you use to teach. Thanks in advance.

Take care,

Mark J.
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Old 01-26-2009, 04:09 PM   #214
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Ron Tisdale wrote: View Post
Ah here is Peter Goldsbury's stab at a translation. Interesting how it melds nicely with the topic...

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...3&postcount=17
Best,
OK, thanks, Ron. I don't remember seeing that before.

I have to be careful because it's easy to read something into someone else's words that's not there, but essentially I don't have a problem with arguing that the discussion about a "groundpath" or "downpath" (or "jin" or "kokyu" or "use the hara" or "ki") is also a discussion about "balance". Shioda demonstrated pretty obvious usage of ki/kokyu skills and also the more sophisticated manipulation of those skills in response to forces produced by Uke. So we can assume that there is some correlation between what he was able to show and the way he described things. Using that assumed correlation I can shift my perspective and argue that jin/kokyu/ki-strength skills are an aspect of "balance", but I'd hasten to add that it's an incomplete description, in my personal opinion. But let me ignore the missing elements and go at it from a "balance" perspective.

When Tohei, Shioda, or whoever demonstrates a "ki test", there are two basic types: the ones that derive their power from the support of the ground and the ones that derive their power from the weight. I could easily extend the "balance" part to both types of ki-tests, but in order to keep it simple I'll stick to the ki-tests that work from the support of the ground. The easiest ki-test type of demonstration to make the point in regard to "balance" would be this one, I think:
http://www.neijia.com/OneLegPushOriginal.jpg

I could describe the phenomenon in that picture from several different perspective: vector-force-resolution, groundpath, one-point/hara, sourcing the responding force low, ki, jin, and so on, including "balance". Functionally, the important point is that Nage is not responding with forces initiated high in the body like from the shoulder, upper-body tension, and so on. What more or less happens is that Nage responds to the incoming push with a force that comes from a low angle up, under, and into Uke's push. Sort of like this:
http://www.neijia.com/OneLegPush.jpg

But when we use this extreme, one-legged demonstration as our example, it becomes obvious that in it's purest form the way Nage is resisting Uke's push is actually a form of "balance". If Nage develops this skill further, he can actually learn to "balance" against pushes from various directions, if you see my point. So therefore I'd say that using the word "balance" is a legitimate way to describe some of the aspects of ki/kokyu/"one-point"/"use the hara" forces, it's just that I personally don't think it tells enough to be completely helpful for someone trying to develop the skills. But that's my personal preference; in reality "balance" is an acceptable term to proffer.

Hope I stayed succinct enough to keep the point clear.

Best.

Mike

Last edited by Mike Sigman : 01-26-2009 at 04:17 PM.
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Old 01-26-2009, 04:15 PM   #215
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Mark Jakabcsin wrote: View Post
Mike,
Would you argee that to learn the skills you describe and to build the intent one starts by learning precise posture? By working from a precise posture at the begining one can learn how things are connected in the body and how to connect the intent through the body. After one attains a degree of proficiency and understanding of this then he/she can begin to connect the intent regardless of posture. Do you agree with that as a valid starting poiint for training?
For all practical purposes I'd agree with you, Mark. I tend to always want to caveat/nitpick in order to avoid future understandings, but what you're saying is true.

Let me use a simple example though to be sure that "precise posture" is a clear term, though. When putting a beginner into a "precise posture", an understanding teacher is going to modify that posture slightly for each student in order to allow for not only results but also to allow for the current physical strength of the student. As an example, a given posture might be taught more erectly to a student with weak legs and somewhat lower to a student with strong legs. So while the posture might be "precise" for a given student, it might not be "precise" in the sense that all students must do it exactly the same. Other than that caveat, I'd agree with you.

FWIW

Mike
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Old 01-26-2009, 04:40 PM   #216
Mark Jakabcsin
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
So while the posture might be "precise" for a given student, it might not be "precise" in the sense that all students must do it exactly the same. Other than that caveat, I'd agree with you.

Mike
Good points Mike.

One thing I learned from Aunkai was training with locked knees or elbows for some drills. This removes one variable from the equation for the begining student. By doing so the student increases his/her chance of feeling other specific areas of the body and the connections there. The knees can be added in later once a basic understand & proficiency is obtained. I am not sure if you agree with that method but I have found it useful.

Take care,

Mark J.
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Old 01-26-2009, 04:50 PM   #217
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Mark Jakabcsin wrote: View Post
One thing I learned from Aunkai was training with locked knees or elbows for some drills. This removes one variable from the equation for the begining student. By doing so the student increases his/her chance of feeling other specific areas of the body and the connections there. The knees can be added in later once a basic understand & proficiency is obtained. I am not sure if you agree with that method but I have found it useful.
Well, there are two different topics here:
(1.) learning to use and generate the mind-directed forces that are called "ki" or "kokyu" in Aikido.
(2.) Conditioning the body.

Stretching the body fibers is part of the conditioning that is common to many practices that contain elements (to varying degrees) of the ki/kokyu skills. However, I'd personally be concerned about any conditioning practice that might possibly interfere with (1.), if you see my point.

A similar example might be in getting a student to hold a certain "standing-post" postures too long that is almost certainly going to cause them to tense muscles and thereby ruin jin/ki/kokyu abilities, even though it might be making them personally strong otherwise. Great care has to be taken not to confuse "getting strong" with "getting ki/kokyu power". It's a swamp out there.

FWIW

Mike
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Old 01-27-2009, 04:49 AM   #218
Gernot Hassenpflug
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Hi Mike,

Yes, it is very hard to do conditioning as well as keeping focus on jin/ki/kokyu. I'm not clear about what an intelligent way to proceed is, but if I get tired, I simply do my best to keep the former even though my body might be tensing up inadvertently in places. My main goal then is to relax and let the jin do the work as much as possible. When that finally does fail, I have to change (usually that means standing up) and then try again.

Mark, I think that the joints, while straight, should remain relaxed, not in order to bend, but in order to allow the flesh/sinews/fascia to move across the joints, part of the jin/ki/kokyu flow from the feet.

Regards, Gernot

Gernot Hassenpflug
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Old 01-30-2009, 12:07 PM   #219
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Mark Jakabcsin wrote: View Post
Mike,
Would you argee that to learn the skills you describe and to build the intent one starts by learning precise posture?
Mike,

A quick question regarding Mark's question.

One of the first things I've learned in internal MA was proper structure (from shoulder - elbows - wrist - finger tips; then later how to connect to center, then to the ground). But without intent I was unable to properly support it... In other words, the structure would break down...

So my teacher taught me where and when to put my mind in order to properly keep structure and pass the force through the body.

So, my understanding is that "posture" and "intent" are not mutually exclusive - and that you can't learn this by purely learning proper posture (in other words, intent has to be taught from the beginning). Am I right in assuming this?

/Steven
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Old 01-30-2009, 01:34 PM   #220
Mike Sigman
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

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Steven Resell wrote: View Post
A quick question regarding Mark's question.

One of the first things I've learned in internal MA was proper structure (from shoulder - elbows - wrist - finger tips; then later how to connect to center, then to the ground). But without intent I was unable to properly support it... In other words, the structure would break down...

So my teacher taught me where and when to put my mind in order to properly keep structure and pass the force through the body.

So, my understanding is that "posture" and "intent" are not mutually exclusive - and that you can't learn this by purely learning proper posture (in other words, intent has to be taught from the beginning). Am I right in assuming this?
Hi Steven:

From years of experience, I'm afraid to answer your question unless/until I feel how you actually demonstrate the things you're talking about. No offense, of course. But allowing for my caveat of wanting to feel what you're doing in order to make sure that we're on the same page, I'd say that clinically you're correct... they are not mutually exclusive by any means. Better posture and support will of course help the jin/kokyu/ki-strength be stronger.

Best.

Mike
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Old 02-17-2009, 10:45 AM   #221
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

I know I missed this thread by like a month, but I can't leave this alone.

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
As an aside:
That whole area of "intention" is starting to get the attention of Western physiologists who are looking into the role that fascia (internal connective tissues).

Thusfar, they believe that the fascia are the first thing activated by the mind when we make a willful intention to do something (such as scratch an itch, reach for a cup, etc.). in turn, fascia fire the muscles into action. Fascia contain a relatively small number (compared to muscle) of nerve cells related to the kind in muscle, and that they can be fired to expand and contract, though far more slowly than muscle does.
Hi Cady-
This post has really gotten my attention. I know it was tangential, but since this thread was "resting" anyway, I thought I'd take the opportunity to ask:
Could you provide some references for your post? This topic is of great interest to me and I am actively researching it. You have pretty much laid out what would be for me the 'holy grail' of findings if indeed it has been published. I am with you in that I think western science has already observed the structures involved in kokyu and aiki, but that the exact way of using these structures voluntarily using intent (especially after conditioning) is the edge-of-my-seat part. I think it is an exciting time in the history of acupuncture/fascia/qi research.

Specifically, your posting seems to be contradictory to the info that I have seen published regarding the below. I'd really appreciate it if you could point me to some research that address these:

1. The servo hypothesis for voluntary muscle control was pretty much laid to rest in the 60s throughout the 80s. Are you suggesting there is now a better rehash of this idea, involving contractile cells other than gamma or beta motor units?

2. The oft-mentioned Scheip paper (easily accessed on the "Science of Fascia" page on Timothy Walters-Kleiner's internal-aiki.com) that claims the presence of myofibroblasts in fascia did not suggest there is neural control of any such contraction. I don't think it was an accident that control of contraction was not addressed in the paper-- if it does occur, it is very likely through hormonal control, and consequently would not be able to be consciously controlled in terms of what part of the body gets a fascial contraction. Is there another paper that addresses neural (conscious?) control of fascial contraction? (you mentioned nerve cells in fascia)

I have been thinking a lot about this but I may need to rethink a lot of things if your post is referring to yet more stuff I haven't read. Thanks for your time!
--Jonathan Wong
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Old 02-17-2009, 12:38 PM   #222
C. David Henderson
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

I'd like to second Jonathan's expression of interest in this aspect of the discussion, and thanks Jonathan for the information and points contained in your question.
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Old 02-17-2009, 01:08 PM   #223
Timothy WK
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

It is my current opinion, based on my experience, that the fascia is not fired on and off like muscle. Rather, it gets "turned on" and simply stays on at a relatively constant strength.

What the fascia does, IMO, is form a tensegrity structure. Once a tensegrity structure is established, the "structure" of the body will stay stabilized all by itself, more or less. In other words, the fascia will begin bearing the load of the body (or any incoming force).

At that point, muscle can be used to "guide" movement---but NOT bear load. (It's actually a bit more complicated, but that's the general idea.) So, when someone says they're "moving without muscle", they're saying their muscles aren't bearing any real load, not that they're not involved. Do you understand that distinction?

--Timothy Kleinert

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Old 02-17-2009, 01:31 PM   #224
Timothy WK
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Also on the Shleip paper, I'm pretty sure he doesn't address control because he didn't actually study living individuals. I'm pretty sure he simply studied samples of fascial tissue under a microscope. As such, the paper discusses how he got the tissue to contract in the lab, but that does not directly show how the process works in the body.

--Timothy Kleinert

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Old 02-17-2009, 02:36 PM   #225
JW
 
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Re: Using ki-skills for "aiki" in Daito-Ryu

Quote:
Timothy Walters Kleinert wrote: View Post
In other words, the fascia will begin bearing the load of the body (or any incoming force).

At that point, muscle can be used to "guide" movement---but NOT bear load. (It's actually a bit more complicated, but that's the general idea.) So, when someone says they're "moving without muscle", they're saying their muscles aren't bearing any real load, not that they're not involved. Do you understand that distinction?
Hi Timothy-
I think I understand what you are saying. For instance, one could "engage" or "activate" the fascial suit with 6-direction intent, then do the jo-trick. He would simply maintain his balanced intent, bourne through the fascia, while someone pushes the jo. Voila, no muscle needed because the strain is distributed through wide swaths of tissue.
But, this "activate-once" model doesn't address the mechanism of how ki is lead by intent, except maybe at the moment of activation, correct? What I mean is, when you induce a ground-path say from your right hand your left foot, and then by chance you need one from the left shoulder to the right foot, maybe in preparation to strike with that shoulder, this is done by using intent, without moving. So, what has just happened in your body at that moment?

It is something consciously controlled at that moment, in a particular location (shoulder to foot). It's that feeling that you can feel at any given moment by "intending" to create or bear a force.

Cady's post made me think that there has been some development in the research regarding what happens at the moment you intend (the moment just before movement in an untrained person). This is a very noticeably feeling that is controllable on a moment-by-moment basis, even in the absence of moving.
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