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Old 01-28-2002, 07:57 PM   #1
Vera Cordwood
Location: South
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 8
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Have you ever felt, "It"?

I am relatively new to aikido, as well as any martial art, and tonight I felt something magnificient.

It seemed that I finally got a glimmer of 'It'. That is what I am calling a realization of what aikido could teach me, and what I could be.

This is hard to explain. I guess some useful terms might include, "graceful motion with my mind connected to my body and in awareness of where each part of my body is".

Anyway, it was such a positive realization, that I just had to try to write about it on here. Am I nuts? Or does there come stages of going past, "This is really difficult" to "This is marvelous!".

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Old 01-28-2002, 08:15 PM   #2
Chuck Clark
 
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Dojo: Jiyushinkan
Location: Monroe, Washington
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 1,134
United_States
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You've done it now!

You're hooked for sure.

Don't stop ... it gets better
(in between periods of pure frustration!)

Practice for the sake of the practice.

Regards,

Chuck Clark
Jiyushinkai Aikibudo
www.jiyushinkai.org
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Old 01-28-2002, 08:22 PM   #3
Sarah
Dojo: Aikido Shinryukan Canterbury
Location: New Zealand
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 21
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Re: Have you ever felt, "It"?

Quote:
Originally posted by Vera Cordwood
I am relatively new to aikido, as well as any martial art, and tonight I felt something magnificient.


That's what keeps me going back......

Cheers
Sarah
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Old 01-28-2002, 09:12 PM   #4
Edward
Location: Bangkok
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 803
Thailand
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chuck Clark

Don't stop ... it gets better
(in between periods of pure frustration!)

I would like to emphasize more on the periods of frustration

I guess it is during those very periods when nothing seems to work that one learns the most.

For me, it is the greatest reward after such long periods to be finally able to "connect" for a (short) while and feel very good with myself and my aikido.

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 01-29-2002, 07:52 AM   #5
Abasan
Dojo: Aiki Shoshinkan, Aiki Kenkyukai
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 813
Malaysia
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oh woe is me! I've been doing this for several years now and have as yet to experience this elusive 'it' you guys are talking about. Am I to die without ever knowing it? sob sob

Draw strength from stillness. Learn to act without acting. And never underestimate a samurai cat.
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Old 01-29-2002, 08:28 AM   #6
ian
 
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Dojo: University of Ulster, Coleriane
Location: Northern Ireland
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I think, similar to a small moment of enlightenment, you get lots of little realisations as you train. However these only occur because of the years of previous training and understanding suddenly fit together. Maybe yours will come all in one go. Took me 12 years before everything suddenly made sense.

Ian
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Old 01-31-2002, 07:49 AM   #7
MaylandL
Location: Western Australia
Join Date: Sep 2001
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I've been doing martial arts on an off for about 18 years (8 of those years doing aikido) and I've only had "it" a few times. Mind you it has been a series of small "its" and not the really big "IT!"

Yeah Vera, I agree its very satisfying. All I can say is keep training and keep chasing that elusive "it" and "IT!" too.

That's what keeps me going back for more. Oh Abasan, don't worry, I'm sure you won't be an "it" virgin for much longer...just keep training at getting it .

On a more serious note, Ian, Edward and Chuck are quite correct. I was in a real rut between 1st Kyu and training for my shodan. Things just didn't go right for a long time. I think I was training too hard and wasn't relaxed. I was training to get my shodan and not for the sake of learning and improving my aikido. When I came to that realisation, the aikido got a little more fluid and natural and I got to enjoy doing aikido for its own sake and not for getting a shodan.

All the best for your training Vera and above all I hope that you enjoy your journey into the wonderful world of aikido.

Mayland
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Old 01-31-2002, 05:23 PM   #8
Mares
Location: Australia
Join Date: Aug 2001
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Quote:
Originally posted by MaylandL

On a more serious note, Ian, Edward and Chuck are quite correct. I was in a real rut between 1st Kyu and training for my shodan. Things just didn't go right for a long time. I think I was training too hard and wasn't relaxed. I was training to get my shodan and not for the sake of learning and improving my aikido. When I came to that realisation, the aikido got a little more fluid and natural and I got to enjoy doing aikido for its own sake and not for getting a shodan.

That seems to be quite a common occurance. That happened to me to. 1st kyu was the hardest rank for me. It is also quite common amongst student at the dojo where i train. Many people speak of the tough 1st kyu slog before everything makes sence for about 6 months after you get your shodan.

Well, that's IT.
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Old 01-31-2002, 10:11 PM   #9
guest1234
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 915
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Oh, I rarely get it...most often gauge a class on how much I'm NOT getting it. Something did happen out of class a few weeks ago, 'tho...

In an ongoing war of pestering vs resistence, I dragged a friend to his feet, insisting that he would LOVE Aikido if he tried it, and encouraging (yes, yes )'grab me here' as I offered my wrist. So a well muscled male approximately one foot taller and 100 pounds heavier locked my wrist in a death grip that exceeded even the toughest Iwama places I've ventured into , as only a male not too interested in pursuing Aikido at the moment can do.

Uh oh, I thought, I am soooo toast As I prepared to launch into an extended dissertation on my Aiki options (aka stalling), the kami smiled on me and he announced "well, I wouldn't just grab your wrist..." and as I felt his weight shift I ducked under his arm holding me, turning around as my arm dropped and he fell forward.

Gosh, I thought, this Aikido stuff might actually work , as with genuine interest he said 'hey, do that again...'

Even a blind pig...
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Old 01-31-2002, 10:34 PM   #10
shihonage
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 890
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Quote:
Originally posted by ca

Uh oh, I thought, I am soooo toast As I prepared to launch into an extended dissertation on my Aiki options (aka stalling), the kami smiled on me and he announced "well, I wouldn't just grab your wrist..." and as I felt his weight shift I ducked under his arm holding me, turning around as my arm dropped and he fell forward.
Haha, Colleen, good job

I personally prefer shihonage for these cases.

Once I decided to risk it and tried to use my "poor man's nikkyo" to showcase Aikido to a muscular, resisting man.
He didn't budge.

So before he realized that his resistance was in fact 100% successful, I used his upward motion that he used to resist, to slip into an ikkyo, and he almost flew into a cabinet headfirst.

Teehee.

Last edited by shihonage : 01-31-2002 at 11:15 PM.
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Old 02-05-2002, 11:26 AM   #11
Carl Simard
Location: Quebec City
Join Date: Jan 2002
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Quote:
Originally posted by MaylandL
When I came to that realisation, the aikido got a little more fluid and natural and I got to enjoy doing aikido for its own sake and not for getting a shodan.
You're right on that one. When I was beginning in aikido, I was way too much concentrated on "doing things right for the exams". Last summer, I had no grade to pass. I simply practice aikido for the sake of it, having fun, without putting pressure on myself to perform well in face of examiners. Guess what ? I progressed much more rapidly than before. My sensei even note it and tells me, at the end of summer, that it was hard to believe that I was the same guy than 3 months before. Moves and techniques were simply more naturals and fluids. Now I simply practice that way all the time and exams are now not much different than regular class, you simply have people watching you and that's all...
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Old 02-06-2002, 05:14 PM   #12
Mona
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 52
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Re: Have you ever felt, "It"?

Quote:
Originally posted by Vera Cordwood
I am relatively new to aikido, as well as any martial art, and tonight I felt something magnificient.

It seemed that I finally got a glimmer of 'It'. That is what I am calling a realization of what aikido could teach me, and what I could be.

That's great! But what's even better is feeling 'it' outside of the dojo. I was the type of person to get upset over nothing, and now, if anything problematic happens, I always keep my cool, and it's not a matter of trying not to show my anger or frustration, I would really be feeling 'all balanced' inside. You don't have to try hard to control yourself anymore, because your inner self has been (unconsciously) evolving to reach 'it'.

Mona

blessings,

~ Mona
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Old 02-23-2002, 05:57 AM   #13
Orihime
Dojo: Sei Shin Kai (Compiègne)
Location: France
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 32
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I started Aikido nearly 2 years ago, and I think I felt "it" maybe twice or three times, no more. Indeed it was a reward, for most of time I train hard with the impression that I will never do it correctly, and I feel often more exhausted than anything else. But I love Aikido.
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Old 02-23-2002, 10:09 AM   #14
ndiegel
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 28
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In my opinion, "it" is one of the greatest feelings. As for those periods of frustration, it is said that one actually learns the most on those plateaus where nothing seems to be connecting. One day, you just wake up, and WHOAH, it worked!!!

Noah

"Expect Nothing, Be Ready For Anything"
-Samurai Battle Chant
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Old 02-23-2002, 01:53 PM   #15
mj
Location: livingston, scotland
Join Date: Dec 2000
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I once tried a 'nikkyo' on a 2nd dan, his knees startled to buckle, slightly...and then the 'nikkyo' disappeared.
As he started to rise, with a vulpine smile on his face, I stepped in with a 'direct' irimi-nage.
Wonderful. Those moments are rare in practice, because things are so predictable.

No-one can tell me about frustratiom, though...I'm married

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