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Old 07-07-2008, 12:58 PM   #1
Rocky Izumi
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Daito Ryu's Aiki, Structure, and Leverage

Quote:
Mark Murray wrote: View Post
If uke's structure is better, no angle will change the outcome -- it won't work. Resistance is for those who don't have good structure, and if they don't have good structure, then kotegaeshi will work. Changing an angle is just jujutsu. yeah, it'll work for those resisting (see above sentence). But come into contact with someone who has structure and angles don't matter.

Reread Ellis Amdur's post here on AikiWeb about Tomiki holding his hand out to judo players. No amount of angles will work on someone who has structure, or as some people call it -- aiki.

Want to make kotegaeshi work with resistance -- work on having better structure/aiki.
Having the correct angular position in relation to Uke is a key part of aikido and probably what you mean by "aiki."

PS I am unsure what you mean by "aiki." It seems like you are using it as a catchall for something that makes things work in aikido. This is not a flame, just a question for clarification. Rock

Rock

Last edited by Rocky Izumi : 07-07-2008 at 01:01 PM.
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Old 07-07-2008, 06:59 PM   #2
rob_liberti
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Hiroaki Izumi wrote: View Post
Having the correct angular position in relation to Uke is a key part of aikido and probably what you mean by "aiki."

PS I am unsure what you mean by "aiki." It seems like you are using it as a catchall for something that makes things work in aikido. This is not a flame, just a question for clarification. Rock

Rock
I actually think the terms go something like this:

Internal Power - maintaining the 6 (some say 8) harmonies of intentions (which is easiest to do with good structure).

Aiki - applying that internal harmony to someone touching you and bringing them into your harmony.

Here is my basic opinion on all techniques:

As long as one has superior internal harmony (intention ability) their technique (like nikkyo) should work. That typically means the person with the better structure. And that is why we say things like it's best to do kokyunage first, get uke's mind on their balance and off of resisting technique for a split second (of "uke's focus betrayal" - my term) before applying the technique. As structure and intention improves relative to uke, you can get away with less kokyu nage and move into what I would consider kokyu rokyu - and some call aiki.

Rob

Last edited by rob_liberti : 07-07-2008 at 07:06 PM.
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Old 07-07-2008, 07:47 PM   #3
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Mark Murray wrote: View Post
If uke's structure is better, no angle will change the outcome -- it won't work. Resistance is for those who don't have good structure, and if they don't have good structure, then kotegaeshi will work. Changing an angle is just jujutsu. yeah, it'll work for those resisting (see above sentence). But come into contact with someone who has structure and angles don't matter.

Reread Ellis Amdur's post here on AikiWeb about Tomiki holding his hand out to judo players. No amount of angles will work on someone who has structure, or as some people call it -- aiki.

Want to make kotegaeshi work with resistance -- work on having better structure/aiki.
I can appreciate the development of structure as well as the use of geometric angles. But no single study is the final cat's meow in performing Aiki-type techniques. What ever happened to the old adage , "give me a lever long enough and I can move the world?"
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Old 07-07-2008, 08:03 PM   #4
rob_liberti
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Chris,

Well I believe that the point is that there pretty much isn't any lever long enough to move me if you aren't doing it with structure at least as developed at mine.

Rob
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Old 07-07-2008, 09:00 PM   #5
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Chris,

Well I believe that the point is that there pretty much isn't any lever long enough to move me if you aren't doing it with structure at least as developed at mine.

Rob
agreed, unless we use an inanimate lever (machines have their own structure, right?)

The issue in this thred appears to be one of intent. Is the opponent using structure to hide his center of gravity (I.e. Punking you) or is he using structure to be cooperative as defined by Kevin.

Yes, I use my relaxed structure to make my own leverage come from the bottom of my feet and perhaps even longer with mental extension. The longer the lever, the less force is experienced at the location of my grip.

Last edited by Chris Parkerson : 07-07-2008 at 09:07 PM. Reason: use proper word defined by Kevin
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Old 07-07-2008, 10:19 PM   #6
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

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Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Chris,

Well I believe that the point is that there pretty much isn't any lever long enough to move me if you aren't doing it with structure at least as developed at mine.

Rob
Rob,

You got me thinking a bit here. I recently moved my refrigerator and did so with little effort. Now it has great structure. It has a wide four cornered base, a good amount of weight and no joints or soft tissue.
I used a variety of physical principles to do so. One of them was to bypass both its weight and "grounded structure". If anything, I used its structure to make my work less difficult. I used the refrigerator's structure against itself.

I also recently felled a 35 foot tree. One principle I used was the same as with the fridge. I loaded its structure (floated it) until I could drop enough weight on it that it could not remain erect.

Now KG can be performed the same way against cooperative structur and often against pinking structure., I can drop a good 240 pounds on a specific point in space via relaxation. Even against a static posture, the timing of (1) connection to the center, (2) the slight float and (3) the dropping of 240# of weight is pretty massive. It can bend large men at their waist (or hurt their lower backs). I suggest that I have (1) bypassed structure or (2) defeated it.

Now if the biped structure moves, well all movement has weakness as Jen states, and that is why we have many techniques.
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Old 07-08-2008, 06:46 AM   #7
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

I keep reading this senitment and it is just not true.
I just had someone tell me that a horse cannot completely over power them so why would they think that someone with internal power and aiki could.

The answer is simply that a horse (or a refrigerator as the case may be) is not trained to instantly weaken the person trying to manipulate it.

The ONLY way you are not going to get weakened is if you have comparable intentions/structure as the uke with internal power and aiki. That's it. Your body cannot make a big enough lever. And even If you use a stick, it is reasonable that I can probably weaken you through the connection of the stick - but I'd have to train specifically for that for a while!

Rob
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Old 07-08-2008, 06:58 AM   #8
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Hiroaki Izumi wrote: View Post
Having the correct angular position in relation to Uke is a key part of aikido and probably what you mean by "aiki."

PS I am unsure what you mean by "aiki." It seems like you are using it as a catchall for something that makes things work in aikido. This is not a flame, just a question for clarification. Rock

Rock
Hi Rock,

Rob L. posted some definitions about "internal power" and "aiki" that I think apply. But, let me see if I can clarify a bit.

When I work with some peers in aikido who haven't trained at all in the "internal power" exercises, then I'm finding that they can't get wrist locks to work on me. I've stood on one foot, sideways with my hand extended and they can't get kotegaeshi to work, no matter what angular position they take. (Obviously, weight matters here. If someone decided to jump onto my outstretched hand, I'm going to drop my hand down. There's no way I can hold up that kind of weight on an outstretched hand, but then that isn't kotegaeshi.)

BUT, I can't do that with peers that are working on the "internal power". I have to have both feet on the ground and work at keeping structure because my peers are just as good as I am at "internal power".

AND when I work with those who have much, much better "internal power", I find that it doesn't matter what I do, kotegaeshi works for them -- anytime, anyplace, anywhere. Angular position is not a factor. Plus, those that have excellent jujutsu skills can overcome my structure because, well, I've only been doing this for a little over a year. My "internal power" sort of sucks still. Good skill can overcome it. Give me a few years and I don't think that'll be a factor.

I think that angular position is jujutsu. Having very good angular position can create some excellent jujutsu, but I'm starting to believe that it isn't necessarily "aiki" as it relates to what made Ueshiba powerful. Adding "aiki" to jujutsu creates some remarkable things, though.

Mark
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Old 07-08-2008, 08:07 AM   #9
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
I keep reading this senitment and it is just not true.
I just had someone tell me that a horse cannot completely over power them so why would they think that someone with internal power and aiki could.

The answer is simply that a horse (or a refrigerator as the case may be) is not trained to instantly weaken the person trying to manipulate it.

The ONLY way you are not going to get weakened is if you have comparable intentions/structure as the uke with internal power and aiki. That's it. Your body cannot make a big enough lever. And even If you use a stick, it is reasonable that I can probably weaken you through the connection of the stick - but I'd have to train specifically for that for a while!

Rob
Hi Rob,

Thanks for the response. I suspect that your statement about becoming "weakened" is not about telekinesis or quantum influences so I suspect you are simply talking about what has been called "the four levels", i.e., skew the "levels" and the structure becomes unstable.

Now, I first encountered the CMA-style of internal structure back in 1975 (I was 22 years old) when a senior student of William C. C. Chen bounced me a good 20 feet. I went airborne and landed on my arse. It did make an impression on me and set me into a pretty serious study of CMA. At least as serious as my budget could handle.

But Rob John, Mike Sigman and Dan have all told me I do not have the structure they are talking about. I have to admit that I discontinued my CMA structural training because a "kink" in my low back got worse over the years and my structural training exercises did not heal the muscular imbalance that (on some days) allows me hardly any resistive structure at all. Nevertheless, "in adversity comes opportunity", as the fortune cookie says.

I have found structure that bypasses my own kinks through relaxation and in spite of my inherent structural weakness. I have bypassed my own potential structure with a structure of necessity.

Yesterday, Moe Stevens, his son and grandson came out to help haul away the wood I had cut down from that tree I mentioned. It was a bad day for my low back muscle imbalance. Nevertheless, I and two others lifted a 13 foot twisted branch with a base diameter of 10 inches and a tip diameter of about 3 inches. It weighed about 300 pounds.

The guy in front lost his footing and dropped his end. I was in the middle near a curve in the wood. As it fell, it began to torque and a 6 inch stub with a 6 inch diameter dug into my ribs. Now gravity and torque with 300 pounds of mass attacked my ribs. For the first nanosecond, I braced.

By the second nanosecond, I instinctively became what I call "single weighted" with my center of gravity over my weighted leg. This gave me the ability to sink, extend my unweighted leg and absorb the force without getting my ribs broken or falling and landing on my arse again. No bruise this morning either.

So, my bad back and its inherent lack of structure, was bypassed by my ability to use three principles. (1) Tai Chi-style walking, (2) riding energy without losing posture and (3) "suck in and spit out" using redirection under a crisis.

That branch was fresh live wood (no rotting). Its structure was sound. Yet, I never became unstable when it struck me. I see the same principles hold with KG under randori conditions. Only, I turn the tables. I use my relaxed weight and specific points to overwhelm someone else's structure. If they can step out of it, I suggest I made the movement too big. If done well, it is not about my structure as much as it is about my subtlety. It is just physics.

By the way, I would love to continue this discussion in real time and face to face. I am sorry I missed the Akuzawa seminar. I had business that got in the way. But if you want to attend Hal von Luebbert's seminar in Ohio, I am sure Moe and Hal would give you the podium for a period of time to show us what you mean. They are both great guys with no agendas or attitudes.
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Old 07-08-2008, 08:42 AM   #10
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Creating Opening II

Joint and wrist techniques are far more effective against a weapons attack. This is what most joint locks and throws were originally intended...as "secondary defenses" to the armed attack.

The weapon "offensively" enhances and multiplies the force of the attack with the added dimension of distance and technology (hand vs. wood vs steel point and edge). Certainly, if given the choice we would all use a gun vs. a stick in a life or death encounter. Certainly, with two armed opponents the "primary offense" is using the weapon at hand.

Yet, the addition of the weapon in terms of distance, creates an "additional joint" that allows greater leverage to apply technique. It is a potential achilles heal. The tip of the weapon (bo, jo, bokken, nunchaku) moves with speed and variance. BUT THE HAND that is holding it no longer moves with speed. It is locked into place given the holding of the weapon.

Thus, the weapon itself can be used as a "lever" to uproot the wrist, elbow and shoulder as the attacker continues to hold onto the weapon. (Archimedes said "Give me a long enough lever and a fulcrum and I can lift the earth). The length of the weapon creates a greater magnitude of potential energy.

As to the "empty hand", I always tell my students, "Pop'em in the head first and then apply the wrist technique/throw."

Joseph T. Oliva Arriola
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Old 07-08-2008, 08:54 AM   #11
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Chris,

I'm sure you have developed some sort of structure. I think Dan (and the others) have probably taken it a bit farther than most. If you have so much more structure than your uke to the level I'm aspiring to then I would assume you need to be on my side of this debate that structure/internal harmony/and the skills to bring others into your own harmony is the most important aspect and that compared to that leverage doesn't matter much.

I'm willing to show anyone what I'm talking about. I think it would probably best that I actually get a bit further in my own development before I am granted center stage at someone else's event for any amount of time! But I'll continue to improve and if you are still interested in some time, then by all means I'll come and share.

Rob
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:06 AM   #12
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Hi Tuturuhan,

If you read my last post, I would be interested in knowing if what I am speaking about is similar to your "Female" energy. To be specific, I only provide resistance until I feel a connection with the force coming at me.... The I blend with a suck-in or baqua foot motion, redirect the force and spit it out (uproot) of drop weight on a throwing point.
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:29 AM   #13
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Hi MTL, Chris,

Structure to no structure, form to formlessness...mass to energy...energy to mass.

Yin/female energy is deep, dark and hidden. She absorbs your attack by using the "circle", a black hole. In her formlessness, their is an intelligence that subtly guides and directs. Before you know it you are trapped in the "center" of her web.

You cannot harm her. She is a wisp of wind, water that envelopes the most pointed of swords.

Yang/male energy is "structure and form" birthed by major Yin. It is the vessel by which female accomplishes her bidding. She is "the face that launches a thousand ships". She is the Goddess Kali, death and destruction are in her wake. Birth and creativity is her hope.

Joseph T. Oliva Arriola
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:30 AM   #14
rob_liberti
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Popping someone in the head first before applying a technique does what? Breaks the uke's structure... When you "create an opening" you are just "de-structuring" someone BEFORE you apply a lever which means leverage is seconardy in importance. I'm sorry if I'm belaboring this point. I've been primarily communicating to a 4 year old and I'm developing a habit of breaking things down to simpler and simpler terms.

Rob
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:42 AM   #15
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

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My pleasure. We educators (I'm only an educator wannabe at this point) have to stick together.

I really like this part! It speaks to a big part of my own raison d'etre, if I may get a bit French. And I agree sharing what we each experience of our training is a pretty cool thing. I know this kind of forum is no substitute for hitting the mat, but it does offer so much food for thought.
Take care,
Matt
You can get as french as you'd like. so long as you keep your tongue in.

Raison d'etre:
You are here for no other purpose than to realize your inner divinity and manifest your innate enlightenment.-OSensei

Now that I'm so wise, I'll leave you little people to your talk. Ha-Ha.

Jennifer Paige Smith
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:45 AM   #16
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Popping someone in the head first before applying a technique does what? Breaks the uke's structure... When you "create an opening" you are just "de-structuring" someone BEFORE you apply a lever which means leverage is seconardy in importance. I'm sorry if I'm belaboring this point. I've been primarily communicating to a 4 year old and I'm developing a habit of breaking things down to simpler and simpler terms.

Rob
"Open your mind. Use your mind. Think. Think. Think."
- A 4 year old I know

Ya know, when we have such developed skills and such confidence in them, what does it hurt to relax one's position for a moment and take a little bit in? Maybe it turns out to be simply poetry, maybe it doesn't resonate with you, but maybe it might open a door to friendship and communication among exploring people. If not, you've got everything you already know to return to.
-A 39 year old I know

Last edited by jennifer paige smith : 07-08-2008 at 09:49 AM.

Jennifer Paige Smith
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:11 AM   #17
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Jennifer Smith wrote: View Post
"Open your mind. Use your mind. Think. Think. Think."
- A 4 year old I know

Ya know, when we have such developed skills and such confidence in them, what does it hurt to relax one's position for a moment and take a little bit in? Maybe it turns out to be simply poetry, maybe it doesn't resonate with you, but maybe it might open a door to friendship and communication among exploring people. If not, you've got everything you already know to return to.
-A 39 year old I know
Jen,

"A Whack on the Right Side of the Brain" Eureaka!!! (Hmmmm...copyright infringement?)

Best,
Joe

Joseph T. Oliva Arriola
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:21 AM   #18
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Jennifer, I think I paid my dues listening to the leverage and finesse approach! I don't think I would have come to my new opinion if I weren't open to being convinced awaay from what I already knew...

If somone wants to make a compelling argument on why leverage is just as important as structure then I'm still waiting for it. It's just so basic. You need good structure to apply leverage...
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:33 AM   #19
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

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Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Jennifer, I think I paid my dues listening to the leverage and finesse approach! I don't think I would have come to my new opinion if I weren't open to being convinced awaay from what I already knew...

If somone wants to make a compelling argument on why leverage is just as important as structure then I'm still waiting for it. It's just so basic. You need good structure to apply leverage...
Those are pretty cheap dues.

But I get where you're coming from and I genuinely wonder what your next opinion will be.

Thanks

Jennifer Paige Smith
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:37 AM   #20
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Jennifer, I think I paid my dues listening to the leverage and finesse approach! I don't think I would have come to my new opinion if I weren't open to being convinced awaay from what I already knew...

If somone wants to make a compelling argument on why leverage is just as important as structure then I'm still waiting for it. It's just so basic. You need good structure to apply leverage...
Simple...try erecting a structure without leverage.

Joseph T. Oliva Arriola
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:45 AM   #21
Chris Parkerson
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Popping someone in the head first before applying a technique does what? Breaks the uke's structure... When you "create an opening" you are just "de-structuring" someone BEFORE you apply a lever which means leverage is seconardy in importance. I'm sorry if I'm belaboring this point. I've been primarily communicating to a 4 year old and I'm developing a habit of breaking things down to simpler and simpler terms.

Rob
popping someone in the head or anywhere else may I'd may not create instability. In my early "yang" years around 1980 I wrote an article in "Survival Magazine". Part of the article demonstrated how structure could jam a front thrusting kick and uproot the kicker perhaps damaging his rear knee in the process. My stomach was developed for that purpose but my low back pain definitely prevented me from becoming awesome with such skill.

Still, in the mid 1990's during the earlly UFC craze, one competitor was perturbed that I had ground skills and once we stood up again, he plugged me by surprise in the gut with a short fist. This time I kept structure and let both feet "ungrip" the floor. It moved me about 2" straight back and there was no penetration.

In the early 2000's I started to get good with standing rooted and absorbing blows with relaxed energy that absorbed the force without losing stability.

Now days I prefer to just ride the energy with posture and Tai Chi style weight shift, the five style step and a bit of Baqua circle.

All of these forms of energy can neutralize a punch or kick.

But if you stretch out your arms and try to catch a 240 pound weight your stability is going to go down the tubes unless you are the incredible hulk. A good KG canpriduce enough force to overwhelm in the same manner as long as you are accurate. Far enough away to maximize stress on the structure yet close enough to keep joe's feet glued to the ground via friction.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:08 AM   #22
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
If somone wants to make a compelling argument on why leverage is just as important as structure then I'm still waiting for it. It's just so basic. You need good structure to apply leverage...
With the utmost respect for you and your years of training,
please consider the destruction of the Spanish Armada as an example of leverage without structure.

The Spanish galleons were large, strong, heavy and powerful. Great Structure. But they were decimated by wind and water... both structureless like Joe is talking about yet very powerful.

That the wind could blow on unbending masts while the sea uprooted their balasts, is the key. their very structure was what defeated them as Yin forces won the day.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:15 AM   #23
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Hmmm, who has said that the structure Rob is talking about is not flexible. A reed has structure...but it bends in the wind.

B,
R

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Old 07-08-2008, 11:37 AM   #24
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

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I just had someone tell me that a horse cannot completely over power them so why would they think that someone with internal power and aiki could.
Rob, if you are going to indirectly cite my comments, then please get them right. I will be happy to continue this discussion proper on the 'Daito Ryu and Harm' thread -- as soon as Dan responds to me.

I do want to make it clear that I was *not* saying a horse could not overpower me. On the contrary, it certainly can. What I said is that I have a greater power/skill differential over my two-year-old than a horse does over me. This was in response to your statement that Dan (yes, you were talking about Dan in particular) is to me as I am to my two-year-old. The main point of my remark had to do with the extremity of using a two-year-old as an example of the level of domination possible.

I think it is especially disingenuous for you to talk about 'internal power and aiki' as a factor I disregard. I have been very clear that I think those buzzwords are important. The point I think you may be missing is that in order for your hypothetical 'aiki master' to be as much better than our bumbling Dad than the Dad is better than the two-year-old -- then Dad has to be very bumbling indeed. For every incremental gain Dad makes in skill and power, then the 'aiki master' actually has to be better by the *square* of that increase in order to keep the ratios the same. The whole flaw in your argument is in assuming that Dad cannot possibly have any skill/power of his own. If you really stop and think about your premise, it becomes absurd very quickly -- because what happens if the 'aiki master' has a two-year-old son of his own? Imagine the ber-aiki-master you would have to hypothesize to make *this Dad* look bumbling.

The reason I mentioned the horse was not as an example of lack of power or even lack of 'skill'. If you think a horse is comparable to a refrigerator in any way, you really must avoid ever being near one -- or you *will* get hurt. My point is that your argument posits someone who is simply exponentially better than *everyone*. I thought and continue to think it is a silly position. You may label this as 'one-upsmanship', excessive precision, or twisting and stretching words. However, I don't see any way to engage in a substantive conversation without taking seriously the statements you make. The reason I do that is to find out whether you really mean them or not -- especially when they strike me as being so exaggerated. I would ask you to either use a similar level of precision when citing my arguments -- or else refrain from doing so, since I do not want to be an anonymous straw man in the service of your ongoing argument that *nobody else gets it*.

As I said, I'm happy to continue the substantive discussion in the other thread. I am leaving this comment here so that it appear near your remarks, but I wouldn't object or be surprised if Jun moved both your initial comment *and* my response to the other thread.

Again, no hard feelings. If Dan continues to decline to respond to my questions, then I will go ahead and discuss them with you. I hope you understand why I prefer to discuss what I consider to be exaggerated claims made for Dan with Dan himself, as a matter of common courtesy. That way, if Dan does feel the claims are exaggerated, we need not subject ourselves to a silly argument.

Chhi'md
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Old 07-08-2008, 12:59 PM   #25
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
Location: ohio
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Re: Making Kote Gaeshi Work - With Resistance

Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote: View Post
Hmmm, who has said that the structure Rob is talking about is not flexible. A reed has structure...but it bends in the wind.

B,
R
I do not think anyone has made that assumption. In fact, I suspect that everyone discussing the issue totally respects a well developed structure and would assume flexibility gives structure a distinct advantage.

Flexible structure, as seen in Sonin's Sambo tapes is beautiful and is likely what Joseph Arriola is calling form and formlessness but expressed in acrobatic wrestling style. But I have not seen any of Rob John's tapes that express this part of his skill set. What I have seen is horse stances and cross power strikes and kicks. Of the others, I have seen no tapes.

What I have been told is that structure is weak when expressed through "lead hand-lead foot" attacks (and I can only assume they include "lead hand-lead foot" defenses as well).. I have been told that single weighting and double weighting is different than what I am calling it and in the difference is the crux of the matter.

So I provided an absorbing-type (Systema-type perhaps) drill that included the fluid sequence of (1) providing enough resistance so that I can attach to Uke's the center of gravity (2) floating uke and his structure on initial contact, and (3) using the proper geometric point (defined by him as he is in motion) to drop my weight so that he either bends over, falls or hurts his back trying not to fall or bend over.

Now, I did this on one leg which negated the principles of "cross power" and the idea that the lead foot/lead hand style was inherently weak. After all, if you are on one leg (the right one) and you are using the right arm, there is likely very little cross power to employ.

What was probably not observed (except by the well trained eye) is how I used torque for momentum and the reaction of "gravity pushing back" that then got redirected into my arm (coming through my one-legged stance) to accomplish my goals.
Thus, an old guy with a bad back just used superior mechanical advantage (the principle of the two stroke engine i.e. piston and drive shaft) to counter my opponent's structure.

I PM'd Rob on this but did not get a response. Perhaps he got pre-occupied as I often do as weel. No harm done. Perhaps he would like to give his interpretation publicly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1G3A-ZGd1M

As you can see, as I absorb the blow, energy/force comes out of my body at various places but I did not lose structure either. Neither did I have to overthink the technique in the crux of battle.

To further explain, "throwing point" geometry is deefinitely there. You just do not have to dwell on it.

Last edited by Chris Parkerson : 07-08-2008 at 01:01 PM. Reason: wrong spelling
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