Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Spiritual

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-16-2008, 06:31 AM   #1
Teresa
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1
United_States
Offline
Difference between Bushido and Aikido

I am new to these all area of martial arts and hear a lot of terms sometimes used as if they are the same or at least very similar.
I am all into clarity so if something is not clear for me I can get stuck until I find my answer or realize that there is none.
I even found a post saying that there is no such thing as a Bushido martial art as the term Bushido referred to the code of conduct while the fighting techniques were what we know today as karate or Aikido.


Is this really the case?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2008, 07:52 AM   #2
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

I think you should do some searches on this site and others like e-budo and aikido journal. Look up terms like bushido, budo, bujutsu. The answers from Japanese language scholars and people experienced in Japanese arts may surprise you.

Very Briefly:

Bushido: largely a term coined after the period of Sengoku Jidai by someone who romantacized the feudal period. Take most writings expounding the virtues of Bushido with a large grain of salt.

Budo: Generally thought of as a martial way or path. Often romantacized as "Stopping the spear", really more in tune with "advancing with a halberd".

Bujutsu: Generally thought of as martial art, often used interchangably with Budo in Japan. Dreager (one of the first serious western researchers and practitioners of Japanese Martial Arts) wrote of bujutsu and budo as martial art vs martial way where in the art skillfull means came first, and in the way, the way came first. Subsequent researchers and practitioners may not agree...

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2008, 08:55 AM   #3
Timothy WK
Location: Chicago, IL
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 177
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Quote:
Dora Bishop wrote: View Post
I even found a post saying that there is no such thing as a Bushido martial art as the term Bushido referred to the code of conduct.
Yes, the idea of Bushido is often likened to the code of Chivalry for Western Knights. (And like Ron said, both Bushido and Chivalry were romanticized ideals, made popular long after the time period ended where the codes supposedly operated in.)

--Timothy Kleinert

Aikido & Wujifa qigongs
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2008, 10:14 AM   #4
Walker
 
Walker's Avatar
Dojo: 光道館・叢雲道場
Location: Pacific Wonderland
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 217
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote: View Post
Budo: Generally thought of as a martial way or path. Often romantacized as "Stopping the spear", really more in tune with "advancing with a halberd".
Best,
Ron
Ron, you'll like my new theory about tea ceremony (sado 茶道). As you can plainly see from the kanji it is the way of growing grass on the top of your hut. This is because it takes so long and is so slow the ancient Japanese neglected daily household chores because their legs hurt so much form sitting around drinking tea.

-Doug Walker
光道館 高村派新道楊心流
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2008, 11:00 AM   #5
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

LOL!

Good one! Stuff does get funny meanings when you take it over seas.

B,
R (I need some grass for the top of my, er..."hut"... )

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2008, 01:36 PM   #6
Lyle Bogin
Dojo: Shin Budo Kai
Location: Manhattan
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 588
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Ron,

I have never heard the "advancing with halberd" translation of bu. Is that your own translation?

It certainly sounds more irimi.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2008, 01:49 PM   #7
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Do a search on Peter Goldburry here and on aikido journal and Joshua ...uh...(Josh, What's your last name again???) Reyer here on aikiweb. Ah, found it

I am not a scholar (especially on Japanese language), and I don't play one on TV, so no, it is not my own translation

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2008, 09:46 PM   #8
Pretoriano
 
Pretoriano's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Santa Fe
Location: Aragua Venezuela
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 130
Venezuela
Offline
Question Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

The romantic mud and funny conversation has nothing to do about to the spiritual room and this matters.

Quote the rules that once was adopted at his or that time, or to keep thinking about how to differenciate/ incorporate the spirit of Bushido and managing concepts like a kicthen recipe..haha.. Read This:

One answer is Because Bushido is spiritually speaking nothing about to dead people; is have to be nothing less but a living thing... Ah, that can be hard to understand (it is?).

Tisdale...If you go tomorrow to your Aikido trainning session and find yourself envoided (inside) with Bushido tryng or not to find that differences... and you come here with the correct answer about how it was, I... will yield all that greedy mind full of literary and further dubts and you will receive a bonus... a tie knot tie on the floor.
No offense taken please is just that your comment is empathetic

This means That practising every day that 7 virtues (what is virtue?), Making Tendo to happen at any minute, tyng to understand the law of the void, why and how Shintoism gave Bushido some of its ethics and comprension, solving the Ken/Kan interrogant. etc, etc... SHOULD not to cause desorder or permanent confussion. Thats why this is the Spiritual room.

Any takers?

Praetorian
Aragua, Venezuela

Wisdom exists, principle exists, the way exists and of course anything is possible over the floor. (mene tryng to gain Tsdl friendship from the void).
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2008, 07:07 AM   #9
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Ah, HUH???

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2008, 08:28 AM   #10
Marc Abrams
Dojo: Aikido Arts of Shin Budo Kai/ Bedford Hills, New York
Location: New York
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,302
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Ron:

I think that we need a Spanglish interpreter

It seems that when the word Bushido is used today, it is typically done by McDojo's looking to use "strong" sounding words to try and add some legitimacy to what they do.

NEWS FLASH: The time of the samurai ended sometime before yesterday! I guess that meant that Bushido as a "way of life" went with it.

BACK TO OUR REGULAR PROGRAM: train diligently.

Marc Abrams
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2008, 08:35 AM   #11
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Oh, uh, yeah....what Marc said!

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2008, 12:37 PM   #12
Ketsan
Dojo: Zanshin Kai
Location: Birmingham
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 860
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Quote:
Marc Abrams wrote: View Post
Ron:

I think that we need a Spanglish interpreter

It seems that when the word Bushido is used today, it is typically done by McDojo's looking to use "strong" sounding words to try and add some legitimacy to what they do.

NEWS FLASH: The time of the samurai ended sometime before yesterday! I guess that meant that Bushido as a "way of life" went with it.

BACK TO OUR REGULAR PROGRAM: train diligently.

Marc Abrams
I'm not so sure. If it were samuraido then I'd agree, but it isn't, it's bushido, the way of the warrior. I was always under the impression that Aikido is a martial way, people that follow martial ways are usually refered to as warriors. The japanese for warrior isn't samurai, it's Bushi, so in a strange sort of way we are all following Bushido.

As has been said before, Bushido isn't and never was a nice set of rules and regulations, it was just what warriors did according to the cultural values they were taught from birth.

Our Bushido is different, it is based on the values we're taught in the Dojo but I think spiritually it still has a lot in common with the old Bushido; We still have the same archetypal warrior values, we just express them differently.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2008, 01:09 PM   #13
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

I think you should understand the context that "Bushido" has in terms of Nitobe, the writer who popularized it (post sengoku, and as someone who had a lot of non-japanese influences), and in terms of it's adoption by the WWII Japanese government. There are threads on this site that discuss this.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2008, 10:39 PM   #14
Buck
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 950
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Quote:
Dora Bishop wrote: View Post
.
I even found a post saying that there is no such thing as a Bushido martial art as the term Bushido referred to the code of conduct while the fighting techniques were what we know today as karate or Aikido.


Is this really the case?
When a place announces itself being a Bushido martial art, don't be surprised if at midnight they dress up like ninja and chase cars.

As for Budo, O'Sensei said Takeda taught him Budo. I don't think O'Sensei's Budo lessons where in a lecture hall.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 12:32 AM   #15
Buck
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 950
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Teresa,

I see Inazo Nitobe's book on Bushido, to be a book to prove something. Nitobe caught off guard by a pious Belgian jurist who came down on Nitobe for not having a religion that teaches moral education. Nitobe take aback did some soul searching to find what elements formed his morals. His was Bushido. He then decided to write down "the reasons why such ideas and customs prevailed in Japan" to the non-Japanese who pestered him about it. This is according to Nitobe in his preface.

I figure Nitobe was ticked off, he felt demoralized by sanctimonious westerners who insulted him, his culture, and customs. The way the book is written to persuade for those with a Christian bias. It is not a text book defining Bushido. In my opinion the book is a defensive rebutal against the sanctimonious arguement made my westerners and the pressing inquires made by his wife that challenged his moral system.

Something you get right away if you read the book's preface. I don't know why people miss that?

If you read other works of Inazo Nitobe which most people who talk about his book "Bushido: Soul of Japan" is or isn't the bible of Bushido, don't you read he was an intellect and a pacifist (something in common with O'sensei) . Nitobe being famous in his time wrote in volumes. He condemned the Japanese military in every aspect, thought is was corrupt and didn't like the war and wrote allot about that. To say he wrote Bushido: Soul of Japan as a bible of Bushido is off course.

Nitobe isn't what your looking for and his book shouldn't really have come up.

For us who don't read Japanese and are not scholars:
Try "The Japanese Art of War: Understanding the Culture of Strategy" by Thomas Cleary to get a dead book meaning on Bushido via Miyamoto Musashi's book "The Book of Five Rings."

Try "Japan: The Story of a Nation by Edwin O. Reischauer. In the third edition on page 102-103 it defines a dead book meaning of Bushido. "[Bushido]...idealized combination of Confucianism and feudal ethics."

I would also suggest a more difficult and controversial read is "Hagakure" by Yamamoto Tsunetomo. Who describes those feudal ethics and customs that make up Bushido. The core being ready to die when told to, and not cowardly.

Another book is "The Japanese Mind: Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture, edited by Charles A. Moore, published by Tuttle. Nakamura Hajime writing about Japan's legal, political and economic anatomy says, Bushido was "the actual political philosophy of the Japanese." Bushido is the "distinction between good and bad was extremely and strictly observed. The Bushi would not do anything "mean or despicable even at the cost of their lives." Hajime says this is fact.

I took several Japanese courses in college. I took history and a culture class. The information, I got from the classes where very beneficial to me doing Aikido.

Last edited by Buck : 03-22-2008 at 12:38 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 11:23 AM   #16
Chris Li
 
Chris Li's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Sangenkai
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 3,004
United_States
Online
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Quote:
Philip Burgess wrote: View Post

I would also suggest a more difficult and controversial read is "Hagakure" by Yamamoto Tsunetomo. Who describes those feudal ethics and customs that make up Bushido. The core being ready to die when told to, and not cowardly.

Another book is "The Japanese Mind: Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture, edited by Charles A. Moore, published by Tuttle. Nakamura Hajime writing about Japan's legal, political and economic anatomy says, Bushido was "the actual political philosophy of the Japanese." Bushido is the "distinction between good and bad was extremely and strictly observed. The Bushi would not do anything "mean or despicable even at the cost of their lives." Hajime says this is fact.
The Hagakure was written by a mid-level bureaucrat who had some rather romantic warrior fantasies.

As to Hajime, he should read up on his Japanese history. The entire political structure of Tokugawa Japan was created in order suppress and control treachery by the various samurai lords. Tokugawa himself was, of course, no stranger to such tactics.

Best,

Chris

  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 01:32 PM   #17
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Nitobe came up because of the work Bushido. End of story. Too many people use his writing (and the Hagakure) to justify overly romanticized versions of Bushido.

Quote:
and a pacifist (something in common with O'sensei) .
Ueshiba and his son denied that he was a pacifist.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 08:09 PM   #18
jennifer paige smith
 
jennifer paige smith's Avatar
Dojo: Confluence Aiki-Dojo / Santa Cruz Sword Club
Location: Santa Cruz
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,049
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote: View Post
Nitobe came up because of the work Bushido. End of story. Too many people use his writing (and the Hagakure) to justify overly romanticized versions of Bushido.

Ueshiba and his son denied that he was a pacifist.

Best,
Ron
Although they did recognize the essential quality of
Nigi Mitama, the pacific soul. But that is in union with the other qualities of the soul which are outlined nicely in Saotome Senseis Book, Aikido and the Way of Harmony and John Stevens, The Philosophy of Akido.
I observe that it is difficult for people to incorporate essential wisdom without putting some political or romantic spin on it. But that incorporation comes naturally to a person who seeks out integrous training and practices on the mat of their choice. Whether they got the language for it or not.

Jennifer Paige Smith
Confluence Aikido Systems
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 09:23 PM   #19
Buck
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 950
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

For those interest in learning more about the very interesting Inazo Nitobe.Japan's Bridge Over the Pacific

I find the whole page enlightening here is an excerpt: "Now to Bushido: the Soul of Japan.

"When the book was first introduced to President Roosevelt by a Japanese friend from his Harvard days, the president was so impressed with its prose and its contents that he bought another 30 copies and distributed them to his cabinet members, other colleagues, friends and acquaintances, and urged them to read it. The book favorably influenced the president's agreement to mediate the peace treaty between Russia and Japan at the conclusion of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05. His successful mediation led to his winning of the Nobel Peace Prize.

The book is an introduction to the core values of traditional Japanese society, which Nitobe believed was based on the samurai's code of ethics. Nitobe describes those values in eloquent language, drawing comparisons with the religious and philosophical traditions of other civilizations, including all great Western philosophers, Judeo-Christian teachings, Confucianism, Buddhism, Islam, etc. In the exploration of the main religions and great schools of philosophy from around the world, he both elevates the code of bushido to the same level as the ethical and moral principles of other great civilizations and renders understanding of Japanese culture possible to those who come from those other civilizations. In this sense, he idealizes bushido. By idealizing it, he also simplifies it. He also places bushido in the context of and in the language of our universal search for good person and good society. Hence the appeal of his exposition to people of many languages."
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 09:30 PM   #20
Buck
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 950
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

I found this and it is really awesome info on Inazo Nitobe you got to read the whole thing at
http://www.iic.edu/IICArchive/MinSok...k2003Akaha.htm

Tsuneo Akaha, Ph.D.
Professor, International Policy Studies
Director, Center for East Asian Studies at the
Monterey Institute of International Studies
Monterey, California

Bushido: the Soul of Japan. When the book was first introduced to President Roosevelt by a Japanese friend from his Harvard days, the president was so impressed with its prose and its contents that he bought another 30 copies and distributed them to his cabinet members, other colleagues, friends and acquaintances, and urged them to read it.

The book favorably influenced the president’s agreement to mediate the peace treaty between Russia and Japan at the conclusion of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05. His successful mediation led to his winning of the Nobel Peace Prize. [4]

The book is an introduction to the core values of traditional Japanese society, which Nitobe believed was based on the samurai’s code of ethics. Nitobe describes those values in eloquent language, drawing comparisons with the religious and philosophical traditions of other civilizations, including all great Western philosophers, Judeo-Christian teachings, Confucianism, Buddhism, Islam, etc. In the exploration of the main religions and great schools of philosophy from around the world, he both elevates the code of bushido to the same level as the ethical and moral principles of other great civilizations and renders understanding of Japanese culture possible to those who come from those other civilizations. In this sense, he idealizes bushido. By idealizing it, he also simplifies it. He also places bushido in the context of and in the language of our universal search for good person and good society. Hence the appeal of his exposition to people of many languages.

Last edited by Buck : 03-22-2008 at 09:33 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 09:49 PM   #21
Buck
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 950
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

The controversial book Hagakure is fascinating I found an interview of a popular American translator, the whole interview wasn't that great, but it has its moments. I think it is good to read because you can see maybe why there is a need for pacifism. Here is a part of the interview which has the most to with the book.

http://www.sonshi.com/wilson.html

Interview with William Scott Wilson
By Sonshi.com

Considered by many scholars as the most influential of all samurai treatises ever written, Hagakure, or "Hidden Leaves," remains a must-read for anyone interested in Japanese culture. Finished in 1716, the book contains the philosophy of a samurai named Yamamoto Tsunetomo of the Nabeshima clan, and was scribed by Tashiro Tsuramoto over a seven year period.

When we at Sonshi.com think of Hagakure, we think of William Scott Wilson's Hagakure. His English translation, published in 1979, is the standard. Mr. Wilson accurately describes Hagakure for what it's not: a well-thought-out philosophy reasoned and logical. Rather, it has an "anti-intellectual and anti-scholastic bent throughout." But it is Tsunetomo's radical and unabashed analysis of the way of the "good samurai" that adds luster to an otherwise preachy book. Tsunetomo sensed the weakening of his own samurai class in a time of prolonged peace, when a devoted samurai can neither show valor in battle nor commit junshi, a ritual suicide by disembowelment when one's master has died.

Sonshi.com: Why did Yamamoto Tsunetomo write the book?

Wilson: Hagakure is, for the most part, a series of comments and opinions Yamamoto Tsunetomo dictated over several years to a young samurai scribe who, at the time, had been relieved of his duties. His topics ranged widely, but his main concern was the current mentality or disposition of the samurai class. He felt strongly that with the peace of the Tokugawa era, the samurai had lost their focus on who they were and how they should live their lives. He was not alone in this concern, and a number of other contemporaries from his class were also moved to write their thoughts on these problems. Tsunetomo's radical bushido differed from that of other writers in part because he was a poet, a romantic, and an extreme traditionalist.

Last edited by Buck : 03-22-2008 at 09:53 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2008, 07:52 PM   #22
Buck
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 950
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

In the Wilson interview there they talk about the movie Ghost Dog: Way of the Samurai is talked about. Not seeing the movie I decided to "e-cliff note" it. While surfing I came across this article that is part of a PhD thesis which talks about movie and other things. I liked it. I think it has to do with Bushido and Aikido. http://www.sensesofcinema.com/conten...9/samurai.html

Here is an excerpt: The samurai code of living that Hagakure advocates is likely to be lost on the way, for the text ironically inscribes the absence of the code. It is an empty style that can be borrowed by anyone at any time of history and it no longer signifies a core culture of an Oriental entity called Japan.

Gee...I am hoping for from these posts that people will find it refreshing and interesting.

Last edited by Buck : 03-23-2008 at 07:59 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 01:42 PM   #23
Don_Modesto
Dojo: Messores Sensei (Largo, Fl.)
Location: Florida
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 1,267
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Bodiford's views are always interesting in a discussion of BUSHIDO. I summarized them from his article in: Martial arts of the world : an encyclopedia / edited by Thomas A. Green. I posted this a while ago at http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4217

In the teens, 20's and 30's, Jp was in the clutches of fascists who oriented education to inculcating sentiments of suicidal allegiance to the emperor. The Jpn recognized their technological incapacities and intended to take up the slack with "SEISHIN", fighting spirit (remember the women in Okinawa fighting flame throwers with sharpened bamboo poles? One modernizer who tried to build up Jpn armaments was accused of treason).

To this end, the famous Hagakure ("The way of the samurai lies in death"), written by a romantic gasbag born during the peace of Tokugawa who never had to draw his sword in anger, was widely circulated to inspire fanaticism; martial arts were taken over by an organization called the Butokukai founded for this purpose to introduce youth to fighting and sacrifice; Momotaro, a children's story about a superhuman toddler who drives off the long-nosed barbarians, becomes canonical.

Samurai had become unwelcome in Meiji (1868-1911). They were conservative dinosaurs in a time of cataclysmic change. Nitobe Inazo, a Quaker (I think) wrote Bushido, in English, to reconcile Jpn values with Christianity. After the Jpn womped the Russians, however, an event inspiring peoples throughout the colonial world where whites had theretofore been regarded as undefeatable, values of the samurai were reconsidered. "Bushido" (Nitobe had thought he invented the term which had alternately been referred to as "budo", "samuraido", etc.) was appropriated by the politicos and "DO" took on the meaning of emperor worship (Here, Bodiford explicitly corrects Draeger who denies this history).

A police superintendent wrote that "bujutsu" ought to be written "budo" and this soon occured. In the 30's, the term "dojo" became widespread; borrowed from Buddhism, it lent a patina of spirituality to the rough business of preparing an army of suicidal maniacs. Constabularies regularly policed dojo to enforce the requirement that they have KAMIDANA at the front of their practice area, and bowed to it before and after class.

Offers new perspective to the standard "harmony of the universe, self-perfection thing", doesn't it? Kano, founder of judo, must have rolled over in his grave and it's said that Ueshiba Morihei retired to the countryside to avoid being part of the prostitution of his art thus.

Evidently, after the war, many martial artists acquiesed to the association of their arts with Zen through what had become "The Ways", not because it was actually so, but in order to rehabilitate their practice with the appearance of social utility. YMMV.

Don J. Modesto
St. Petersburg, Florida
------------------------
http://www.theaikidodojo.com/
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 01:58 PM   #24
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Excellent post, Don!

Thanks,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 02:43 PM   #25
Allen Beebe
Location: Portland, OR
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 530
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between Bushido and Aikido

Along with Prof. Boddiford's contribution, the following also might be considered when looking at the post war global expansion of Japanese martial arts and the some of the problems and abuses seem to be re-occurrent:

1910's - 1940's is almost a generational length of time. Those martial artists old enough to be "in the know" would have been suppressed during that time if they had the inclination to be so un-Japanese as to "stand out" against the fervor of the majority, and the vast majority of those young enough not to know any differently were raised and trained exclusively in the Imperial Bushido model*. AND most males in their formative years of that generation lived out Imperial Bushido's creed and didn't come home alive.

The majority of Japan's major religious institutions supported militarism and the war effort.

The larger numbers of those that survived the war to become martial arts teachers and leaders were originally trained how, what, and by whom? Certainly many of these individuals were sincere in trying their best to pass on and preserve what they had been taught, including pedagogy.

*A model who's interest was in training large numbers of officers and soldiers for military [i]consumption[i] not in passing on ethos, personality, and/or spirit of a specialized Koryu.

Last edited by Allen Beebe : 03-24-2008 at 02:45 PM.

~ Allen Beebe
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Aikido DVDs and Video Downloads - by George Ledyard Sensei & other great teachers from AikidoDVDS.Com



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
If you could buy just ONE book about Aikido techniques, what would it be? Karol Kowalczyk Techniques 45 01-31-2014 11:35 PM
Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy Lambdadragon General 100 05-09-2007 10:05 PM
RENT Aikido Instructional DVDs! Brad Marketplace 0 06-17-2006 06:13 PM
Budo, Bushido Mato-san General 34 01-31-2006 08:22 AM
Aikido and Samurai: a few questions Big Dave General 79 05-27-2004 01:05 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:37 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate