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Old 02-13-2008, 09:40 AM   #251
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
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Re: Chinkon Kishin

Ellis, this goes on the wall with that superb post pre-crash on E-budo. I think you know the one I'm thinking of.

I'd better print this one...even the internet doesn't last forever...

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 02-13-2008, 10:12 AM   #252
Erick Mead
 
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Dojo: Big Green Drum (W. Florida Aikikai)
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Re: It's the same old song, but with a different beat since you been gone

Quote:
Ellis Amdur wrote: View Post
Massimo -- a star ... Salvatore, -- the pur[i]st ... Alessandro -- "I like it here."
Wonderful. Why does it seem like all truth worth having comes in threes ...

Had I been so inspired, I might say that this ancient tale might of lost some other tidbits in translation, and maybe there is a better idiom for it.

For instance, the three maybe weren't opera singers, but bluesmen. Aikido is the moving blues. ("He that perceives the truth with resignation....")

. Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, Tommy Johnson, Howlin' Wolf , John Lee Hooker, Eric Clapton. The real blues don't come from technique. Ain't never the same, ain't never different neither. Everybody knows you learn the REAL blues from that man(?) with those dark eyes waitin' for us all down at the crossroads (juji?). Some seek him out, but sooner or later we all come to the crossroads and meet him. The prince of this earth. (Don't the Japanese call him Sarutahiko?). (Izu, Mizu -- beauty born of the cleansed filth of the underworld.) Job was the first bluesman, and look who he learned it from.

If all of them dies, everyone they ever taught or heard them dies, and every sheet of music and every tape or scratchy 'ole phonograph dies too, but the blues don't die. There is still that man always waiting down by the crossroads we all must come to eventually, singing the blues for any to hear.

But -- if ever once you hear it true -- it will possess your soul from that time on. You will die still trying to coax more of that growling deep sad sweetness from the bottom of your being, always knowing you failed in some important way. You could never recreate on your own what that crossroads man makes so easy and cuts you to the core.

Those who try to go their own way are safe, sad and fruitless. The blues possess you; you become the instrument. Those that do that instead, remain sad -- the condition of this world and him that runs it, but they also touch beauty, and deeper truth on the dark road to salvation. Don't nobody practice budo but come to understand that it's a dance with the devil ... but that's a dance nobody gets to bow out -- or to decline when offered -- so best to learn the steps sooner than later.

Last edited by Erick Mead : 02-13-2008 at 10:24 AM.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 02-13-2008, 11:59 AM   #253
Toby Threadgill
Location: Evergreen, Colorado
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Re: Chinkon Kishin

Ellis,

Perfectimento.

Polishing mirrors can be a tiresome job. Your satire frequently skewers tedious pontification with grace, a keen sense of the poetic....and a wink!

Thanks for the laugh,

Toby Threadgill
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Old 02-13-2008, 05:05 PM   #254
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
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Re: Chinkon Kishin

Thanks Ellis,

Reminds em of an old Homily I was told back in my youngin years...

A Young Musician steps off the train from Podunk and is in New York for the first time. He is enthralled with the Bright Lights and Big City and wanders around for a while dreaming of great future and applause. An old couple was walking by and the old man notices his violin case. "I see you're a violinist young man." Oh yes Sir" The young man says, "I am here to make my fortune and hopefully become famous someday. But tell me Sir, This is my first day in New York, and I was wondering if you could tell me how to get to Carnagie Hall?"

"Practice,practice,practice." The old man replied as he strolled off into the night.

William Hazen
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Old 02-14-2008, 08:47 AM   #255
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
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Re: Chinkon Kishin

Quote:
William Hazen wrote: View Post
Reminds em of an old Homily I was told back in my youngin years...

A Young Musician steps off the train from Podunk and is in New York for the first time. He is enthralled with the Bright Lights and Big City and wanders around for a while dreaming of great future and applause. An old couple was walking by and the old man notices his violin case. "I see you're a violinist young man." Oh yes Sir" The young man says, "I am here to make my fortune and hopefully become famous someday. But tell me Sir, This is my first day in New York, and I was wondering if you could tell me how to get to Carnagie Hall?"

"Practice,practice,practice." The old man replied as he strolled off into the night.
That's sort of a Universal Homily that we can all blend with.
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