Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-03-2007, 11:46 PM   #1
Shannon Frye
Dojo: Aikido Fellowship of VA / Chesapeake Va
Location: Virginia
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 182
United_States
Offline
Difference between styles

After searching for answers on previous posts, I found only 1 other post (which was derailed by the originator bad-mouthing tenchin nage) that addresses my questions...

What are the differences between aikikai and yoshinkan aikido?
If I were watching a stylist of either style, what characteristics would I see to help me determine which style the aikidoka had trained in?

Some background on my question: I previously trained at an Aikikai style dojo. My new dojo considers itself "independant", but the lineage of the instructor traces back to Shogo Kuniba (soke) , who trained under Gozo Shioda (soke -founder of Yoshinkan - uchideshi to O'Sensei). Kuniba soke integrated his training in aikido and juijitsu into Goshin budo (now called Goshindo). In learning goshin budo techniques, the aiki influence is plain to see, and my instructor and I often joke that we "speak the same language", with regards to aiki.

Anyone training in yoshinkan - would you say that your style has a greater jujitsu content when compared to aikikai?

(Please don't comment that one is better than the other- that's not my intention - I would just like to know differences)

Thanks!
Shannon

"In the end there can be only one"

www.AikidoFellowship.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 12:56 AM   #2
Charles Hill
Dojo: Numazu Aikikai/Aikikai Honbu Dojo
Location: Three Lakes WI/ Mishima Japan
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 837
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Hi Shannon,

If you take a look at AikidoJournal.com's aikiexpo videos, I think you will see the basic differences quickly. They have clips up at their site or you can purchase dvds.

Charles
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 07:48 AM   #3
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Dojo: Roswell Budokan, Kyushinkan Dojo, Aikido World Alliance
Location: Roswell, GA USA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,724
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

IMHO, the differences in style is only one of emphasis. Yet, you can watch two people from the same style and see a difference in emphasis. So, I don't have a clue how you would know by watching.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 08:06 AM   #4
xuzen
 
xuzen's Avatar
Dojo: None at the moment - on hiatus
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 965
Malaysia
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Shannon Frye wrote: View Post
After searching for answers on previous posts, I found only 1 other post (which was derailed by the originator bad-mouthing tenchin nage) that addresses my questions...

What are the differences between aikikai and yoshinkan aikido?
If I were watching a stylist of either style, what characteristics would I see to help me determine which style the aikidoka had trained in?

Some background on my question: I previously trained at an Aikikai style dojo. My new dojo considers itself "independant", but the lineage of the instructor traces back to Shogo Kuniba (soke) , who trained under Gozo Shioda (soke -founder of Yoshinkan - uchideshi to O'Sensei). Kuniba soke integrated his training in aikido and juijitsu into Goshin budo (now called Goshindo). In learning goshin budo techniques, the aiki influence is plain to see, and my instructor and I often joke that we "speak the same language", with regards to aiki.

Anyone training in yoshinkan - would you say that your style has a greater jujitsu content when compared to aikikai?

(Please don't comment that one is better than the other- that's not my intention - I would just like to know differences)

Thanks!
Shannon
Wrt to Aikikai, among themselves there are so much variation that there is no standard technicality...

Wrt to Yoshinkan, the emphasis is on pedagological approach. All components of a technique are broken down to its most basic parts and then reversed engineered to make it work against resisting opponents.

Initially there is little flow in Yoshinkan technique, we work more at angles and leverage to obtain the technique.. but as one gets more experienced, their techniques become smoother.

By and large, I think in any typical Yoshinkan class, the jutsu aspect is still emphasized.

Boon.

SHOMEN-ATE (TM), the solution to 90% of aikido and life's problems.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 08:39 AM   #5
Ivan Sekularac
Dojo: Aikido Yoshinkai Canada
Location: Toronto, Canada
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15
Canada
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Anyone training in yoshinkan - would you say that your style has a greater jujitsu content when compared to aikikai?
Yes... Shioda Sensei learned from O'Sensei before the war while he was still under a lot of infuence from Takeda and Daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu. After the war O'Sensei slowly changed some things and move his style away from Daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu.

These differences are sometimes small and somethimes little bit bigger... for instance... Yoshinkan kept some Daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu terms while Aikikai introduced new ones...

All in all, check your local dojos for both styles or more if you are interested... watch few classes and make a decision... I think that both are great ways to learn Aikido although the training method is somewhat different and will suit different individuals...
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 08:46 AM   #6
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

You have gotten some good answers so far.

One additional thing you might notice when watching the top rank of the Yoshinkan instrcutors is a certain adherence to a distinct postural form. Look for the weight being more forward, the back being kept straight, very sharp, crisp throws, and a well defined zanshin.

Not saying that these aren't seen else where...just that you will tend to see a lot of uniformity amoung the top in yoshinkan.

Best,
Ron (pedegogy is the most important distinctions, as Xuzen said)

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 09:13 AM   #7
Timothy WK
Location: Chicago, IL
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 182
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

IME, Aikikai prefers same side stances (tori faces off with right foot & uke left foot) while Yoshinkan prefers same foot stances (both tori and uke face off with right foot). This, I think, is a more profound difference than it sounds. It causes you to make certain choices in movement.

Re: Daito-ryu and jujutsu---My experience with Daito-ryu leads me to believe that Yoshinkan *isn't* any closer to Daito-ryu than Aikikai. I've encountered a number of people who have ideas about Daito-ryu or "old school aiki-jujutsu" that just aren't true about Daito-ryu.

The big difference, IMO, is the teaching methodology. The stylistic differences, at higher levels, is pretty minor.

Last edited by Timothy WK : 09-04-2007 at 09:15 AM. Reason: grammar & spelling

--Timothy Kleinert

Aikido & Wujifa qigongs
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 09:45 AM   #8
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Timothy Walters Kleinert wrote: View Post
IME, Aikikai prefers same side stances (tori faces off with right foot & uke left foot) while Yoshinkan prefers same foot stances (both tori and uke face off with right foot). This, I think, is a more profound difference than it sounds. It causes you to make certain choices in movement.
Interesting...my experience in Yoshinkan is over 10 years. I see both aihamne and gyakuhamne stances practiced. For most waza, especially the 150 basic waza. Can you reference specific sources?

Quote:
Re: Daito-ryu and jujutsu---My experience with Daito-ryu leads me to believe that Yoshinkan *isn't* any closer to Daito-ryu than Aikikai.
Interesting again. I am fairly familiar with the Main line of Daito ryu under Kondo Sensei. And have some minor exposure to some other varients, some quite different from the Main line. In my experience the Main Line has a lot of similiarities to the Yoshinkan training. I believe I has been specific on that in other posts. I'll try to locate the post.

Of course, if your exerience with Daito ryu is Kodo kai, Takumakai, or Roppokai, I have not trained much if at all in those branches, so that might explain the divergence in opinion.

Quote:
I've encountered a number of people who have ideas about Daito-ryu or "old school aiki-jujutsu" that just aren't true about Daito-ryu.
Me too!

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 10:30 AM   #9
Basia Halliop
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 711
Canada
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

What I know about Aikikai would suggest that if someone says they study at an Aikikai dojo your next question should be what Shihan(s) they are descended from or try to follow. The Aikikai is more of a political structure, it doesn't tell you as much stylistically as knowing the various Shihans or at least sub-organizations does.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 10:37 AM   #10
Timothy WK
Location: Chicago, IL
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 182
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote: View Post
Interesting...my experience in Yoshinkan is over 10 years. I see both aihamne and gyakuhamne stances practiced. For most waza, especially the 150 basic waza. Can you reference specific sources?
Technically, I spent a semester practicing Yoshokai, not Yoshinkan. It was my understanding that they were almost the same, but maybe there are significant difference I'm unaware of. Anyway, we almost exclusively practiced same-foot stances. Maybe it was just this particular teacher.

Quote:
Interesting again. I am fairly familiar with the Main line of Daito ryu under Kondo Sensei. And have some minor exposure to some other varients, some quite different from the Main line. In my experience the Main Line has a lot of similiarities to the Yoshinkan training.
My experience is with Hakuho-ryu (formerly Hakuho-kai Daito-ryu), which is a mixed of Takumakai & mainline. Yoshokai didn't seem "closer" to Daito-ryu to me. In my Yoshokai class, some people claimed Yoshokai/Yoshinkan was "more like old school Aiki-jujutsu" because, basically, it was "harder". But it didn't seem to have the same "lock & drop" philosophy typical of Daito-ryu. It also didn't seem to exhibit the same type of soft throws I see in Hakuho-ryu.

[edit] Ron, I would be curious what you think are the similarities between Yoshinkan and Daito-ryu. My expereince with Yoshokai/Yoshinkan is still pretty limited. [/edit]

Last edited by Timothy WK : 09-04-2007 at 10:40 AM.

--Timothy Kleinert

Aikido & Wujifa qigongs
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 10:54 AM   #11
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Hi Timothy,

My teacher studied under Kushida Sensei (of the Yoshokai) as an uchideshi, after his time with Gozo Shioda. At least in the past, Kushida Sensei (I believe) practiced / taught from both stances. Did you study under him, or one of his students? Was it formal training at the hombu, or a branch/university club? That may explain the difference.

I also had some minor experience with the Hakkohu kai. Okabayashi Sensei is quite a gem, isn't he? Liked what they did very much. I wouldn't say that the similarities mentioned in the post below are as striking in comparison with the Hakkuho kai. The yoshinkan I train tends to have some lock and drop, but most aikido projects out rather than down...yoshinkan does more of the down in my experience than other forms, but still out is a major change from Daito ryu to aikido in general.

http://www.budoseek.net/vbulletin/sh...374#post254374

Quote:
I think Jose (as usual) is spot on. Those are all good similarities, and even when it comes to specific waza, you will see more and more similarities, the older the varient of yoshinkan that you study (look at the waza of Amos Parker Shihan, as an example, with many fully reclining pins that bring the body weight to bear on locked limbs).

Atemi is built in to most (if not all) of the 150 basic yoshinkan waza, and you see similar styles of atemi in the Daito ryu I have been exposed to as well. This extends to even the shape of the hand in various postures for striking.

The use of kiai and the types of kiai are similar as well, though I believe Daito ryu may go into more depth as to when to use what (ha for cutting/pinning/todome, to for atemi, ya for throwing, etc.).

In terms of application of kuzushi, I see more focus on immediate kuzushi in Daito ryu, though my own yoshinkan instructor often says the same thing...opponant's/partner's balance must be broken on contact. But I think Daito ryu (at least Kondo Sensei) stresses it more often.

I also see much more focus in Daito ryu in the application of shime waza (at least as compared to my varrient of yoshinkan) and methods of securing body position during the application of chokes. One of my favorite areas, but I don't get to study it enough, especially since it is rarely taught in aikido.

And of course there is the area of reigi...strong similarities between yoshinkan and Daito ryu, though Daito ryu is even more formal than yoshinkan.

Some of the more fascinating differences to me:

The definition of zanshin: finishing posture/total awareness/remaining mind [yoshinkan] vs "leave nothing behind" [Kondo Sensei]. This was especially well portrayed by the waza of Hasagawa Sensei. She is fantastic.

The depth of waza in the Kajo series as opposed to the basic controls in aikido.

The inclusion of the pretzel waza (though a strong case may be made in my opinion that without the more rarified application of aiki these are show / demonstration waza mostly).

While the specific varient of yoshinkan I study has a well developed buki waza curriculum due in part the the influence of Kushida Sensei on my instructor, some varients of the main line school stress buki waza (weapons work with sword especially) much more than is commonly seen in aikido.

A whole bunch of stuff that I wouldn't be able to even see let alone learn at open seminars, as opposed to regular training under a licsensed instructor.

Best,
Ron
The Jose is was discussing with is a study group leader under the Main line and Kondo Sensei.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 11:39 AM   #12
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,113
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote: View Post
One additional thing you might notice when watching the top rank of the Yoshinkan instrcutors is a certain adherence to a distinct postural form. Look for the weight being more forward, the back being kept straight, very sharp, crisp throws, and a well defined zanshin.
I haven't experienced any Yoshinkan, but I have always really liked that vibrant posture! I imagine it must be similar to the tiny bit of Shodokan I was fortunate enough to experience. It was quite structured like I imagine Yoshinkan tends to be. If that's indeed the case, I think it would only be a great addition to one's Aikido palette!

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 12:56 PM   #13
odudog
Dojo: Dale City Aikikai
Location: VA
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 384
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

If you're talking about basic practice, then some signs are as follows:

Yoshinkan:
uke & nage always start in the same spot
stance seems very rigid
movement seems very stiff
only the sensei is wearing a hakama
all the students move in unison
sensei barks out orders for each movement

These are some of the things that I have noticed from reading my books, watching my DVDs, and watching countless amount of YouTube vids. There are some techniques that once you see them performed in a certain manner, then you know right away that it is Yoshinkan.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 03:06 PM   #14
grondahl
Dojo: Stockholms Aikidoklubb
Location: Stockholm
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 550
Sweden
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

I find the statement that Aikikai practice is based on ai hanmi a little bit odd. The most basic exercises like tai no henko, kokyo-ho, katate dori ikkyo-yonkyo, shihonage etc are all trained in gyaku hanmi from the very start.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 03:17 PM   #15
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

I agree Peter...I've trained in a LOT of different styles, and rarely if ever find a preference for one stance as opposed to another...it's almost always a case by case situation. "What are we studying today?" seems to be the driving factor. In styles more influenced by modern arts like boxing, you won't find attacks from stances that don't make sense in that context, but other than that...

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 08:47 PM   #16
Berney Fulcher
Dojo: Roswell Budokan
Location: Marietta, Ga
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 47
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

It also seems much rarer in Aikikai schools for Nage to lead off with the attack (though I have seen it done).

There are also some terminology differences between Aikikai and Yoshinkan.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 11:48 PM   #17
Shannon Frye
Dojo: Aikido Fellowship of VA / Chesapeake Va
Location: Virginia
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 182
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Great answers - thank to all that have contributed!

Most notable from what I've been reading is characteristic of "lock & drop" within the Yoshinkan style. This definitely has passed down through Kuniba-soke's style. Once my instructor has uke "locked", there is very little extension (as commonly found in modern aikido). There is, however, a big DROP coming!

Again, thanks to all for their answers.

Shannon

"In the end there can be only one"

www.AikidoFellowship.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2007, 06:17 AM   #18
creinig
Dojo: Yoshinkan Würzburg
Location: Würzburg (de)
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 68
United Nations
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Mike Braxton wrote: View Post
If you're talking about basic practice, then some signs are as follows:

Yoshinkan:
uke & nage always start in the same spot
stance seems very rigid
movement seems very stiff
only the sensei is wearing a hakama
So far correct (although depending on the sensei he might not bother with the hakama either)

Quote:
Mike Braxton wrote: View Post
all the students move in unison
sensei barks out orders for each movement
Only true for kihon dosa (basic movements) and hajime training.
In normal technique training every pair has its own pace and sensei mainly watches and corrects individually. Although things still likely look more "orderly" than in many other styles due to the "uke & nage always start in the same spot" thing.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2007, 11:06 AM   #19
Alex Megann
Dojo: Southampton Aikikai
Location: Southampton
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 349
England
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Shannon Frye wrote: View Post

Most notable from what I've been reading is characteristic of "lock & drop" within the Yoshinkan style. This definitely has passed down through Kuniba-soke's style. Once my instructor has uke "locked", there is very little extension (as commonly found in modern aikido). There is, however, a big DROP coming!
Hmm. That also sounds very much like my experience with Fujita Sensei, whose background is Aikikai, rather than Yoshinkai. I have never seen him do a "big" projection; when I have taken ukemi from him, the ground tends to approach very soon and very quickly.

Actually my own practice is quite strongly, if indirectly, influenced by the Yoshinkai, as my teacher (Kanetsuka Sensei) was originally a student of Shioda Sensei, only later learning from Chiba, Saito and Yamaguchi within the Aikikai. Interestingly (perhaps not surprisingly?), his aikido looks to me much more like Shioda's than it does modern Yoshinkai aikido.

Kanetsuka Sensei's teaching is very much based on "kokyu" from basic solid posture and immediate control of uke's centre, and is quite different from the more flowing movement of most of the younger Aikikai Hombu Dojo Shihans that I have seen.

Alex
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2007, 08:56 PM   #20
Charles Hill
Dojo: Numazu Aikikai/Aikikai Honbu Dojo
Location: Three Lakes WI/ Mishima Japan
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 837
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Quote:
Lynn Seiser wrote: View Post
So, I don't have a clue how you would know by watching.
Hi Lynn,

I own the 2002 Aiki Expo video set. If I have it on, my wife (who has no budo experience and negative interest in Aikido) can easily point out which demonstrator is Yoshinkan. She has no knowledge of any other styles except for names. She cannot tell the difference among any other styles.

Your comment is interesting as I believe you are actually in one of the demos, are you not?

Charles
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2007, 01:33 AM   #21
Nikopol
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 96
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

[quote=Ron Tisdale;188587]Interesting...my experience in Yoshinkan is over 10 years. I see both aihamne and gyakuhamne stances practiced. For most waza, especially the 150 basic waza. Can you reference specific sources?

In Yoshinkan all "1" waza (omote) start in aihanmi, and all "2" (ura) waza start in gyakuhanmi, in Aikikai both omote and ura tend to start in gyakuhanmi.

For example Aikikai's basic katatedori shihonage starts in gyakuhanmi for both omote and ura. Yoshinkan's katatemochi shihonage 1 starts in aihanmi. Katatemochi shihonage 2 starts in gyakuhanmi.

It's also easy for posters to confuse the terms.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2007, 10:17 AM   #22
Shizentota
 
Shizentota's Avatar
Dojo: Hakusan A.K.I.
Location: Chile
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 50
Chile
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Hi everyone, I been reading all the answer, you are talking between to styles that in some ways are similars, what if you compare any of the styles before mentioned with Ken Kyu Kai (Yoshinobu Takeda Shihan)
I will be happy to hear what you thing about it.
Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2007, 10:23 AM   #23
Steven
 
Steven's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Yoshinkan Sacramento - Seikeikan Dojo
Location: Orangevale, CA
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 608
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

[quote=Vincent Nikopol;190765In Yoshinkan all "1" waza (omote) start in aihanmi, and all "2" (ura) waza start in gyakuhanmi[/QUOTE]

With the exception of swari waza and ushiro waza ....
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2007, 11:09 AM   #24
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

Hi Steven, for Ushiro waza, don't we usually start with hoja dosa? In that case, ai hamni would be the norm, correct?
ai hamne
shite leads, uke strikes, shite blocks, shite strikes chudan, uke blocks, uke goes behind. Then ai hamne stance with uke behind. In case anyone isn't familiar with this particular form. Corrections welcome.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2007, 11:14 AM   #25
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Difference between styles

I've had the priviledge of training with the local AKI group. I find them a bit different from your standard yoshinkan and aikikai.

But I like training with them a lot! Very joyfull, very serious (somehow they do both), a lot of connection work, and they really got me started on working relaxation more. I really love the way their senior people feel.

The biggest difference from other associations that I've experienced is their seeming lack of rigid form. I know Aikikai schools that stress form as much as Yoshinkan. AKI does something very different I think.

Best,
Ron

Quote:
Manuel Aldunate wrote: View Post
Hi everyone, I been reading all the answer, you are talking between to styles that in some ways are similars, what if you compare any of the styles before mentioned with Ken Kyu Kai (Yoshinobu Takeda Shihan)
I will be happy to hear what you thing about it.
Thanks

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Aikido of Northern VA Seminars - Doran-sensei in Northern Virginia, March 2015



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is the difference in Aikido styles? flamekiller General 24 04-24-2007 12:58 AM
Differences between styles? drDalek General 9 12-19-2002 01:23 PM
Different styles of Aikido Bob Heffner Training 8 06-03-2002 09:15 AM
Different styles of Aikido? Jim23 General 9 02-25-2001 11:17 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:57 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate