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Old 12-17-2001, 10:16 PM   #51
Jon Hicks
Dojo: Tsuchiura Budokan, Ibaraki Renmei
Location: Tsukuba City Japan
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Talking

From my experience in Japan, which is limited, the average Aikidoka goes to a dojo like an American goes to a softball league. Some leages are serious, some are relaxed. Not everyone goes to win the championship. Most just enjoy the game. Of course people like to be promoted, and all seek the black belt. But if you ask the average Japanese Aikidoka if they want to be an Aikido teacher, they will say that it is not their goal. I think most just enjoy the game.
I guess my point is, I love to practice Aikido. I do it every chance I get. I sought a good teacher and I committed myself to him to teach me. I didn`t know anything about Ryuha. I just knew Akido, and that`s what I do 4 days a week.There is nothing wrong with trying different teachers. And I believe that the best teachers don`t have to tell you they are teachers.
Aikido means something different to everyone.

By the way, who`s your favorite player?

Thanks for listening,

Jon

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Old 12-17-2001, 11:56 PM   #52
Erik
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jon Hicks
From my experience in Japan, which is limited, the average Aikidoka goes to a dojo like an American goes to a softball league. Some leages are serious, some are relaxed. Not everyone goes to win the championship. Most just enjoy the game. Of course people like to be promoted, and all seek the black belt. But if you ask the average Japanese Aikidoka if they want to be an Aikido teacher, they will say that it is not their goal. I think most just enjoy the game.
I bet most of them don't look to their sensei as role models on how to live their lives either.
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Old 12-18-2001, 12:28 AM   #53
Jon Hicks
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Not to be taken the wrong way, but do you look to your teacher as a role model?
I think that the Japanese that I train with do look up to our teacher. As far as giving advice for life and such, I don`t think that they feel the urge or whatever.
I don`t know a lot about Aikido history, but I think I have heard that O`sensei use to give lectures about life and Aikido. From what I have experienced in Japan, I have never heard any lectures concerning such topics.Again , my experience is quite limited. Mostly it`s technical knowledge. I think that the average western Aikidoka finds the philosophy to be more appealing than the actual execution of techniques. I wonder why that is? It would make a great paper.

Jon
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Old 12-18-2001, 01:06 AM   #54
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: Aikido in Sweden

Quote:
Originally posted by Aikilove


Dear Goldsbury sama.
In the light of your uptaking about Aikikai in Sweden, I would like to compile a brief historical version of what happend in Sweden and the development of Aikido therein.
[*]There was little or none interaction between Tomitas and Ichimuras students. The swedish aikidoka finds the Japanese way of teaching (at least these two senseis) too severe and harsh, and turbulence within starts to grow.[*]83 Eeringly coincidently, within a week apart, top students under both Tomita and Ichimura, totaly unaware of the others doing the same, each sends a letter to their respective Japanese Sensei, describing their unease with them. In Ichimuras case, his students complain about his "violent behaviour" etc, and in Tomitas case him wanting to break free and start his own Takemusu Aiki among other things, to his students disagreement. Alot of students separates from both senseis.[*]86 The letter, turbulence and the financial situation finaly makes Ichimura to go back to Japan. Now Hombu Dojo is put in a unique situation, since Sweden now officialy is without an, from Hombu Dojo apointed, head instructor. In Sweden however there is no worries, since there is since long well established colaborations with senseis such as Sugano, Nishio and Kobayashi, to name a few. Hombu Dojo didn't think so easy of it however and 1988 they suddenly declared that NO Japanese instructurs was to give exams and seminars on Swedish grounds until there had been a agreenment with the Swedish organization. And so, same year two represantatives from Sweden went to Hombu Dojo and an agreement, unique in the world then, was made, saying that any intructors from Japan or from elsewere was allowed to instruct and hold exam in Sweden, providing of curse that they already was granted that right from Hombu Dojo.[/list]
Today Swedens Aikikai branch, by far the biggest, has with the blessing of Hombu Dojo, an Aikikai grading commitee, that by itself can apoint dan grades up to 4th grade.

Mr Blomquist,

Thank you for your account of the changing fortunes of the Aikikai in Sweden. I have a very clear memory of a meeting held in France in the late 1970s, where the two Japanese instructors from Sweden (who did not communicate with each other at all) were separated by the chairman of the Aikikai organisation. I found this astonishing. Later, I myself was involved in some of the later correspondence with the Aikikai Hombu, when the situation was 'frozen'.

I think that the present situation in Sweden is a major success story and is a model for other national organisations to follow. I think, however, that the good result is due to the fact that Swedish aikidoka themselves took the initiative and devised a formula which was good for Sweden.

Best regards,

P A Goldsbury
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Old 12-18-2001, 02:31 AM   #55
Erik
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jon Hicks
Not to be taken the wrong way, but do you look to your teacher as a role model?
The answer is no, with an exclusion of sorts.

The exclusion is that certain sensei have personal characteristics which I've admired and considered valuable. So, in that context they could be considered role models. Certainly, if I ever run a dojo their influence will have been felt and on a technical basis I've been influenced by a number of people. So in a certain way, yes, they are role models.

But, it pretty much stops there. I sort of see it like I see going to a Catholic priest for marital advice. They take a vow of celibacy and never marry, yet, somehow they are experts on the subject of marriage????? WTF!
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Old 12-18-2001, 07:58 AM   #56
Aikilove
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Re: Re: Aikido in Sweden

Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Goldsbury


Mr Blomquist,

Thank you for your account of the changing fortunes of the Aikikai in Sweden.
My pleasure, though there may be historical faults in my review.
Quote:
I have a very clear memory of a meeting held in France in the late 1970s, where the two Japanese instructors from Sweden (who did not communicate with each other at all) were separated by the chairman of the Aikikai organisation. I found this astonishing. Later, I myself was involved in some of the later correspondence with the Aikikai Hombu, when the situation was 'frozen'.
I find this very interesting (the senseis was seperated!? why?) and would like to hear more about this event. If you find it too off topic you could drop me a mail.
Quote:
I think that the present situation in Sweden is a major success story and is a model for other national organisations to follow. I think, however, that the good result is due to the fact that Swedish aikidoka themselves took the initiative and devised a formula which was good for Sweden.
I agree! Hombu Dojo and IAF seem to find the Swedish way a good one, and IAF are going to have its annual congress, for the first time off Nihon grounds! in Stockholm, no less! Guess who's going to be there? Are you?

Cheers!

Jakob Blomquist
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Old 12-19-2001, 02:01 AM   #57
Peter Goldsbury
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Aikido in Sweden

Quote:
Originally posted by Aikilove

(1) I find this very interesting (the senseis was seperated!? why?) and would like to hear more about this event. If you find it too off topic you could drop me a mail.

(2) I agree! Hombu Dojo and IAF seem to find the Swedish way a good one, and IAF are going to have its annual congress, for the first time off Nihon grounds! in Stockholm, no less! Guess who's going to be there? Are you?

Cheers!
Mr Blomquist,

Here are a few further comments (I have numbered the relevant paragraphs of your post).

(1) The meeting was of an organisation called the EAF (European Aikido Federation) and it took place in Cannes. Your chairman was Sven Gyllsjo (I think the spelling is right) and I spent much time talking with him about the problems you were having in Sweden.

I was completely stunned at the level of latent animosity and mutual dislike anong the Japanese. I think at the time Mr Ichimura and Mr Tomita were not even on speaking terms and Sven sat between them to prevent any possible argument or mutual insults.

In fact, the seeds of subsequent European conflicts, about which you may have heard, were sown at this meeting.

Since then I have been present at other meetings where high-ranking Japanese instructors have insulted each other in a manner I found completely at variance with all I had learned about aikido. Of course, impoliteness and insults are not the exclusive province of the Japanese or of Japanese aikidoka, but what shocked me was these these people were aikido SHIHANS, beacons along the WAY, whose principal purpose (as I thought) was to be a role model to their students.

These experiences led me to question why I was doing aikido and not to expect too much from the teacher, especially in terms of character, or even morality.

(2) The IAF will have a meeting of its management committee. Yes, I shall be there. As you suggest, such meetings are rare outside Japan and I am trying to set some new precedents. Of course, there will be an aikido seminar running parallel with the meeting.

Best wishes,

P A Goldsbury
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Old 12-19-2001, 09:36 AM   #58
Aikilove
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more aikido in Sweden...

Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Goldsbury


Mr Blomquist,

Here are a few further comments (I have numbered the relevant paragraphs of your post).

(1) The meeting was of an organisation called the EAF (European Aikido Federation) and it took place in Cannes. Your chairman was Sven Gyllsjo (I think the spelling is right) and I spent much time talking with him about the problems you were having in Sweden.
With the keyboard you have, it's the right spelling. The Swedish one would be Sven Gyllsj÷.
Quote:
I was completely stunned at the level of latent animosity and mutual dislike anong the Japanese. I think at the time Mr Ichimura and Mr Tomita were not even on speaking terms and Sven sat between them to prevent any possible argument or mutual insults.
Yes, stunning indeed! I wonder why they behaved like that? They simply didn't have much at all to do with each other in Sweden. Formally Ichimura was the head Sensei in Sweden back then, so I wonder if that was what bothered them. What was your role in all of this?
Quote:
In fact, the seeds of subsequent European conflicts, about which you may have heard, were sown at this meeting.

Since then I have been present at other meetings where high-ranking Japanese instructors have insulted each other in a manner I found completely at variance with all I had learned about aikido. Of course, impoliteness and insults are not the exclusive province of the Japanese or of Japanese aikidoka, but what shocked me was these these people were aikido SHIHANS, beacons along the WAY, whose principal purpose (as I thought) was to be a role model to their students.

These experiences led me to question why I was doing aikido and not to expect too much from the teacher, especially in terms of character, or even morality.
I hear you loud and clear Goldsbury sama! Fortunately there are Shihans who indeed behave as the beacons they are looked upon.
Quote:
(2) The IAF will have a meeting of its management committee. Yes, I shall be there. As you suggest, such meetings are rare outside Japan and I am trying to set some new precedents. Of course, there will be an aikido seminar running parallel with the meeting.
Ahh yes! The seminars! That's not to be missed! Can you give me some previous hints on which sensei's going to be there (and train!!)? A rare opportunity for a Swedish aikidoka as myself. I guess I'll see you on the mat in Stockholm! Can't wait to pull of a nikkyo on you!!

Greetings,

Last edited by Aikilove : 12-19-2001 at 09:42 AM.

Jakob Blomquist
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Old 12-19-2001, 05:21 PM   #59
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: more aikido in Sweden...

Quote:
Originally posted by Aikilove
Yes, stunning indeed! I wonder why they behaved like that? They simply didn't have much at all to do with each other in Sweden. Formally Ichimura was the head Sensei in Sweden back then, so I wonder if that was what bothered them. What was your role in all of this?

PAG. I represented the British Aikido Federation at the meeting. I was a surprised bystander and asked awkward questions at the meeting.

I hear you loud and clear Goldsbury sama! Fortunately there are Shihans who indeed behave as the beacons they are looked upon.

PAG. Absolutely, and this probably needs to be emphasised, in view of the 'negative' content of my previous post.

Ahh yes! The seminars! That's not to be missed! Can you give me some previous hints on which sensei's going to be there (and train!!)?

PAG. Well, the training schedule has not been decided yet, but the meeting is likely to be attended by Shihans: Hiroshi Isoyama, Masatake Fujita, Nobuyoshi Tamura, Yoshimitsu Yamada, Katsuaki Asai, Masatomi Ikeda.

A rare opportunity for a Swedish aikidoka as myself. I guess I'll see you on the mat in Stockholm! Can't wait to pull of a nikkyo on you!!

Greetings, [/b]
Finally, for those of you who are wondering at the connection between this thread and Sweden, the aikido section of the Swedish Budo Federation is a good example of how different groups with affiliations / attachments to a widge of range of teachers and interpretatios of aikido can work together in comparative harmony and friendship.

Best regards,

Last edited by Peter Goldsbury : 12-19-2001 at 05:24 PM.

P A Goldsbury
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Old 12-22-2001, 01:06 PM   #60
Aikilove
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Re: Re: more aikido in Sweden...

Quote:
Originally posted by Peter Goldsbury


Finally, for those of you who are wondering at the connection between this thread and Sweden, the aikido section of the Swedish Budo Federation is a good example of how different groups with affiliations / attachments to a widge of range of teachers and interpretatios of aikido can work together in comparative harmony and friendship.

Best regards,
Indeed! Again, I hope to see you there.

Happy X-mas!

Jakob Blomquist
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Old 12-26-2001, 01:40 PM   #61
Johan Tibell
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Smile

I've heard several different stories behind the "split" between Ichimura Sensei and Tomita Sensei. I recall my sensei mentioning the subject during lunch after a seminar but I can't remember more than bits and pieces of it right now. He was there when Tomita started here in Sweden if I remember correctly. I think the fact that Tomita Sensei was affiliate with Saito Sensei could have had something to do with it but I have to check my sources before I say anything for certain so don't hold any of the above against me!

Best Regards,

Johan Tibell
Aikido Dojo Gamlestaden

Last edited by Johan Tibell : 12-26-2001 at 02:16 PM.
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Old 12-28-2001, 09:05 PM   #62
mle
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Factions and Unity

Edward, you have the patience of a saint.. to stick with all this opinionating and some rather uninformed, at that.. and some very informed as well (you know yourselves.. )

I have about 10 yrs experience in MA, started in Aikido MAF, ended up in Ki breakaway Seidokan. Practiced Kung Fu, kickboxing, kenjutsu and whatever else my sempai had to teach me in between. Now I do an older form from newer roots, my teacher's teacher was a Marine who learned from many and distilled a deep and fascinating art.
I do have a shodan in aikido.. to pay back my instructors.. to let them know I listened.

I always felt split between the Aikikai and the Ki Society and it seemed to me like a simple difference in teaching methods.

In any discipline, from biology and linguistics to nuclear science, there are camps and splits.

One can cross camps and listen, or one can "take religion" and close one's mind and heart to all other information.
Some people are better suited to one or the other behavior.

If you find something that speaks to you, by all means, devote yourself. But do not expect that all others must go that way.
Thus lies the path of the Inquisition, of World War II, of many evils.

Be generous.
Explore.
Be gracious and curious.
Edward, I commend you for being curious, for being courteous, for questioning.

You are far more likely to find your own truth than to merely accept what you are fed.

My opinion is that Aikido is more a philosophy than a mere set of techniques used to teach it.

It suffers from being treated, inside and out, like a religion, however, there are so many religious overtones on a set of varying techniques that one may decide which one wants.
It makes a great way of life.
And yes, it is all aikido.

That is.. it is all budo.

Also a way of life, and less exclusive; containing many of the principles Ueshiba borrowed from. It all came from somewhere. Look to older sources and see. Aikido is very young.

And the instructors now are blind men who felt their part of the elephant and describe it as best they can. Why not try to train with all of them and see all of it?

mle

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Old 12-29-2001, 08:37 AM   #63
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: Factions and Unity

Quote:
Originally posted by mle
Edward, you have the patience of a saint.. to stick with all this opinionating and some rather uninformed, at that.. and some very informed as well (you know yourselves.. )

mle
But surely, this is what happens in discussion forums such as this. Everyone is free to give an opinion, whether informed or not, and to be persuaded or unpersuaded, as we wish. Personally I have found the whole thread very informative and stimulating. And I have also got to know Edward, from his posts in this and other threads, so that when we finally meet, as I hope we will, we can train together and also have much to talk about.

Happy New Year!

Last edited by Peter Goldsbury : 12-29-2001 at 08:41 AM.

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Old 12-29-2001, 09:17 AM   #64
deepsoup
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Re: Factions and Unity

Quote:
Originally posted by mle

I always felt split between the Aikikai and the Ki Society and it seemed to me like a simple difference in teaching methods.
Ironic, then, if you go right back to the beginning of this thread, you'll see that Edward started it with the words:

Quote:
I have come to believe that, apart from styles with competition, all Aikido styles are essentially the same
(My italics) Which would imply that the author himself doesn't include the Ki Society in those styles of aikido which are 'essentially the same'.


Sean
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Old 12-29-2001, 09:20 AM   #65
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I am undoubtedly what Emily considers uninformed. But I think when someone starts or joins threads with comments that those who broke from the Aikikai lacked proper loyality and humility,or those who don't bow are abandoning what Aikido is about, well, they should be ready for the comments other have in response.

Personally, I think members of this forum have responded much more gently to Edward than they did a few months ago to Louis, and there is a similar undertone in both posts. And I'm glad to see that more gentle approach, by the way. Just like saying you shouldn't be surprised if what you say reflects on your sensei, you shouldn't also be surprised if what you say and how you say it reflects on you, yourself.
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Old 12-29-2001, 09:21 AM   #66
PeterR
 
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Hi Sean

Happy New Year

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 12-30-2001, 02:27 AM   #67
otto
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Re: Factions and Unity

Quote:
Originally posted by mle
One can cross camps and listen, or one can "take religion" and close one's mind and heart to all other information.
Some people are better suited to one or the other behavior.
mle
Beautiful , can i use that phrase in the future?....

Quote:
Originally posted by mle
If you find something that speaks to you, by all means, devote yourself. But do not expect that all others must go that way.
Thus lies the path of the Inquisition, of World War II, of many evils.

Be generous.
Explore.
Be gracious and curious.
hummmmm....totally off topic here
but mle just made me recall some of my father's words on why we men need women....he said something like this "women are pacifiers , ecualizers...and they have the precious ability to end conflicts , to cease quarrels , to bring harmony.."...well he went then on describing some of the other more obvious abilities .

that may be exagerated , absurd or even false most of the time , but certainly Emily gave life to those words in mi view...

Great post...
sorry about the nonsense people , and excuse my broken english

the best of life for all of you on this coming new year....

Feliz A˝o Nuevo amigos.

Ottoniel David

Last edited by otto : 12-30-2001 at 02:29 AM.

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Old 12-30-2001, 02:29 AM   #68
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2 cents Plain

Quote:
Originally posted by mle

I always felt split between the Aikikai and the Ki Society and it seemed to me like a simple difference in teaching methods.
Can't say I'd agree to that. There are just too many areas where both organizations seem to go in opposite directions.

What some people don't realize is that the Ki Society is not a static style. As time goes on, the difference between Aikikai and the Ki Society will become even greater.

For those of you who don't consider aikido as a religion, I'd have to agree...sort of .
If you mean aikido is a structured philosophy with a theology and like Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Judaism or even Shinto, then of course it isn't a religion.

However, the word religion derives from a Latin root word, religio, meaning "to be connected to." This is also the origin of the word "relate". It's this relationship or connection to life that could also be an interpetation of the word religion. In this case, aikido could be considered a religion, or a way a person relates to life. Of course, things like work, raising a family and other activities would also be considered a "religion" using this broader definition.

Finally, here's another way of looking at all of this:
Quote:
from ki-info group 8/7/01


Kashiwaya Sensei once said something to the effect that at first you practice your sensei's aikido, then you practice your own aikido, and finally you just practice aikido (the universal aikido).

It is not practice that makes perfect, it is correct practice that makes perfect.
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Old 12-30-2001, 05:42 AM   #69
Edward
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Emily,

Thanks for your post.

Dr. Goldsbury,

It would be an honour for me to meet you and practice together at the next opportunity.

Deepsoup,

I don't think my personal opinion matters that much, but for your information, I do consider Ki society, Yoshinkan and Takemusu as being true Aikido styles and I would happily and proudly practice at dojos affiliated to the above styles during my travels. (I haven't had the chance yet to practice at any Ki society dojo, but hopefully soon).

Colleen,

What you say is unfortunately true.

It is a pity though that the internationalization of Aikido would become one of the major causes of its degradation. Late Doshu seemed to have been aware of this fact as he mentioned it in his book "The spirit of Aikido", but he had good faith in human nature. Let's hope he was not over-optimistic.

Happy New Year 2002 to all!

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 12-30-2001, 07:18 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally posted by Edward

Deepsoup,

I don't think my personal opinion matters that much, but for your information, I do consider Ki society, Yoshinkan and Takemusu as being true Aikido styles and I would happily and proudly practice at dojos affiliated to the above styles during my travels. (I haven't had the chance yet to practice at any Ki society dojo, but hopefully soon).
I think what our man Deep was alluding to was your exclusion of styles which include competition. That would of course include three major styles of Aikido; Ki Society, Yoshinkan and Shodokan. What in your mind is true Aikido?

I just recieved a private post in response to this post part of which says If you didn't read it, I'd suggest having a look at Jun's interview with Koichi Kashiwaya (http://www.aikiweb.com/interviews/kashiwaya1200.html). Coming from a senior instructor outside of Shodokan, what Mr Kashwaya has to say about competition is very refreshing. I agree - much of his explanation mirrors what Shodokan competition is all about.

Last edited by PeterR : 12-30-2001 at 08:58 AM.

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Old 12-30-2001, 10:23 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally posted by PeterR

I think what our man Deep was alluding to was your exclusion of styles which include competition. That would of course include three major styles of Aikido; Ki Society, Yoshinkan and Shodokan. What in your mind is true Aikido?

I just recieved a private post in response to this post part of which says If you didn't read it, I'd suggest having a look at Jun's interview with Koichi Kashiwaya (http://www.aikiweb.com/interviews/kashiwaya1200.html). Coming from a senior instructor outside of Shodokan, what Mr Kashwaya has to say about competition is very refreshing. I agree - much of his explanation mirrors what Shodokan competition is all about.
In my opinion, true Aikido is the one which follows the teachings of Osensei faithfully. This includes Takemusu which is Osensei style at his last days, Yoshinkan which was Osensei's style when he was young and energetic, Ki society which was founded by Osensei's undoubtedly most brilliant and faithful student. Ki society did not introduce any substantial change to Osensei's Aikido from the technical side, but rather from the spiritual and ki development side. As for competition at Ki society, as a matter of fact, Osensei never mentioned this kind of competition, so we will never really know his opinion about it.

As for Shodokan, we all know the historical facts and the conflict between Osensei and Mr. Tomiki regarding competition. Many sources speak about a verbally violent confrontation between the two which ended their relationship. In this respect Shodokan is not true Aikido, and anyhow we all know that at Shodokan Dr. Kano is reverred much more than Osensei, and Mr. Tomiki never considered himself as a true student of Osensei. I personally think that it has a strong relation to judo.

This does not in any way mean that Shodokan is better or worse than any other style, but just based on the above, you would agree with me that the use of the name Aikido is somehow misleading, which explains why at some dojos in Japan, the style is called Aiki-Judo.

This is my personal opinion, you might agree or disagree with it.

By the way, I am not aware of any competition at Yoshinkan. They are strongly against it as far as I know.

Cheers,
Edward

Last edited by Edward : 12-30-2001 at 10:34 AM.
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Old 12-30-2001, 12:19 PM   #72
Edward
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Originally posted by ca
I am undoubtedly what Emily considers uninformed. But I think when someone starts or joins threads with comments that those who broke from the Aikikai lacked proper loyality and humility,or those who don't bow are abandoning what Aikido is about, well, they should be ready for the comments other have in response.

Personally, I think members of this forum have responded much more gently to Edward than they did a few months ago to Louis, and there is a similar undertone in both posts. And I'm glad to see that more gentle approach, by the way. Just like saying you shouldn't be surprised if what you say reflects on your sensei, you shouldn't also be surprised if what you say and how you say it reflects on you, yourself.
Colleen,

In all my posts, I try to express as faithfully as possible the ethics and principles of Aikido, as I understand them from the writings of Osensei, late Doshu kisshomaru, and the many Uchi-Deshis who studied directly from Osensei. I cannot help not to feel disgusted when I know that these values are no longer appreciated and valued by a considerable part of this forum's members. Fortunately, I do not see this in the actual dojos I visit, which leads me to believe that Aikiweb forum active members do not actually represent the opinion of the Aikido community.

I find it really pathetic that I should receive any strong replies when I am only repeating the words that I read in books and articles and interviews by the founder and his closest disciples. As if the principles of Aikido require now to be defended by beginners such as myself.

I reiterate my position: There is no merit in supporting the Sensei when he's right, that's very easy. The real merit is in supporting the Sensei when he's wrong. If you think Aikikai is wrong in some aspect, it's very easy to break away and claim that you are the true Aikido (and start collecting the money, coincidentally!), the real merit is in staying in the founder's organization and trying to fix what you consider as being the problems from within and thus make your organization and your MA stronger.

Yes, vanity and arrogance and profit are behind the separation from the main stream. And my position is incorruptible.

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 12-30-2001, 02:33 PM   #73
tedehara
 
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Edward - When you post a message to the internet, you could get a reply from anywhere in the world. Some of these people are outright crazy. Other answers are shaped by different enviornments and teachings. Most of them are going to be strong opinions. After all, the people wouldn't have taken the time to reply unless they didn't feel strongly about it. And you, as a reader, probably wouldn't be interested in a conversation where everyone simply agrees with each other.

You also have a right to express your opinion, don't let anyone try and intimidate you from that. Not everyone will agree with you, perhaps everyone will disagree with you. Yet if you are true to yourself and your beliefs, that shouldn't matter.

Thanks for starting an interesting thread.

Colleen - I always thought my aikido experiences were weird until I began reading your posts. Perhaps someday, we can practice together and you can teach me your Hebrew greeting.

Peter Goldsbury - Make sure your boy gets Sakamoto Ryoma right. Hate ta have da family show what we've learnt since the Satsuma Clan.

Just another sunny Sunday morning in Chicago.

Last edited by tedehara : 12-30-2001 at 04:36 PM.

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Old 12-30-2001, 04:37 PM   #74
Erik
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Originally posted by PeterR
I think what our man Deep was alluding to was your exclusion of styles which include competition. That would of course include three major styles of Aikido; Ki Society, Yoshinkan and Shodokan. What in your mind is true Aikido?
You know something, there are times I feel for you Shodokan types. It must suck to get this over and over and over again.

And, all over a training tool.

Last edited by Erik : 12-30-2001 at 05:09 PM.
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Old 12-30-2001, 05:06 PM   #75
Jim23
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I agree, sometimes this all seems so petty.

Train hard, eat right, die anyway.

Jim23

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