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Old 09-07-2007, 02:03 PM   #176
bob_stra
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Quote:
Graham Wild wrote: View Post
WOW, a SHOULDER WHEEL in sumo!

This is just an opinion, but I would have to say NO WAY!

Regards,
and another

http://sumo.goo.ne.jp/eng/kimarite/20.html

And possibly a third

http://sumo.goo.ne.jp/eng/kimarite/50.html

Need to seem them in action to verify...static positions look correct and description gels more or less

Keep an eye on the judo thread and see what it turns up. Already, a mention of Kano studying jujitsu scrolls...

Last edited by bob_stra : 09-07-2007 at 02:08 PM.
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Old 09-08-2007, 03:39 AM   #177
wildaikido
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Quote:
Bob Strahinjevich wrote: View Post
Quote:
Bob Strahinjevich wrote: View Post
and another

http://sumo.goo.ne.jp/eng/kimarite/20.html

And possibly a third

http://sumo.goo.ne.jp/eng/kimarite/50.html

Need to seem them in action to verify...static positions look correct and description gels more or less

Keep an eye on the judo thread and see what it turns up. Already, a mention of Kano studying jujitsu scrolls...
Only number one (shumokuzori) Bob. But the fact is this still a sacrifice throw were you load him up like kata garuma, and the throw is achieved by falling back. So not technically a kata garuma. I still don't think sumo wrestlers could load up and throw over. To much weight involved.

The kakezori is very similar to a technique we do from a head lock. But here the person is not being thrown over, he is being forced down with the leverage. The tasukizori is a combination of makezori and shumokuzori, where you leaver into the side, and push them sidewards and down.

Try again

I love sumo btw, and I have never seen it. But if it is included, it could very well have come from judo

To stay on topic I think we have a few sumo type throws in Yoseikan's technical syllabus, such as ashitori.

Regards,

Graham Wild
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Old 09-08-2007, 04:40 AM   #178
bob_stra
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Quote:
Graham Wild wrote: View Post
Only number one (shumokuzori) Bob. But the fact is this still a sacrifice throw were you load him up like kata garuma, and the throw is achieved by falling back. So not technically a kata garuma
Only if you stick by the strictest of strict interpretations of those words (kata GURUMA), Graham.

However, in practice....and seemingly in judo competition....loading him up on your shoulders and falling backwards still classifies it as kata guruma. Or at least it did, until it was outlawed. Odd too that it was, as in some ways, this method is safer on uke that what replaced it (drop knee)

In any case -

I think it establishes an interesting possibility of kata guruma - perhaps in crude form - existing well before Kano codified it.

Keep an eye on the judoforum thread, as details may arise there
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Old 09-08-2007, 05:10 AM   #179
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Bob Strahinjevich wrote: View Post
However, in practice....and seemingly in judo competition....loading him up on your shoulders and falling backwards still classifies it as kata guruma. Or at least it did, until it was outlawed.
This is interesting. When I took part in the dan promotion shiai in Himeji one of the most amazing things I saw was a kid take out an opponent 50% heavier with kata guruma. No weight divisions. Is kata guruma outlawed or just the falling back.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 09-08-2007, 09:03 AM   #180
David Orange
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Re: Why is there so much confusion about Aikido.

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Graham Wild wrote: View Post
Isn't that Genseki Otoshi!
Took me a moment to recognize what you were saying. I should read more slowly.

Actually, I never thought of the daito ryu name for that technique. So I guess you're right. If it were kata guruma, it would be judo!

Thanks.

David

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Old 09-08-2007, 09:11 AM   #181
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

WWE versions of kata guruma. Its acting but still requires strength and technique. Sumo wrestlers of the past probably weren't as heavy as the ones of today so maybe they could perform more spectactular throws.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BLIKm6UZKA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_GNAJfHz64

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yYGfkPT86M

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUt-5PnrfjY

Sokaku Takeda doing a back breaker.

http://www.stenudd.com/aikido/deutsc...ch-23-kiai.htm
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Old 09-08-2007, 09:34 AM   #182
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Quote:
Peter Rehse wrote: View Post
This is interesting. When I took part in the dan promotion shiai in Himeji one of the most amazing things I saw was a kid take out an opponent 50% heavier with kata guruma. No weight divisions. Is kata guruma outlawed or just the falling back.
Hiya Peter

Kata guruma is fine. For example -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ko2ziLntk5c

It's kata guruma + "back supplex" that's outlawed now (IIRC). And even then, maybe not everywhere?
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Old 09-08-2007, 09:47 AM   #183
David Orange
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Re: AIkibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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David, I think on Mochizuki Kancho's book it says Nihonden Jujitsu Kurou obi aikido. Did he ever refer to his aikido as jujitsu when you were his student? Unno Sensei told me we don't really do aikido but Aiki budo or aiki jujitsu.
Sensei believed that it was all jujutsu--judo, sumo, aikido, daito ryu, etc. But he did tell me that judo-type jujutsu evolved from sumo, while aiki-jujutsu evolved from ken jutsu. His kata, ken tai iichi reflects that.

He said, "Jujutsu is Japanese culture. It is an expression of the Japanese character, created by smaller, weaker people to overcome the large and strong through perseverance and creativity."

The title of his book, Nihonden Jujutsu kurou obi aikido (Japanese-style Jujutsu, black belt aikido), reflects his belief that all the major unarmed fighting methods of the samurai period were expressions of jujutsu and that the modern methods are all rooted in that jujutsu. Karate, of course, is not included in that summary, not being originally Japanese.

Sensei rather believed that once one reached black belt (shodan) level in aikido, it simply opened the door to the wider world of Japanese jujutsu.

Still, he gave ranks in aikido, up to ninth dan, and had separate aikido and judo classes, but in the aikido class, you might do a lot of types of jujutsu and judo. It was the aiki set-up that made it aikido, in his approach. You could do a judo-type tai otoshi or uchi maki komi, but if you set it up with aiki, then it was within his aikido.

Best to you.

David

"That which has no substance can enter where there is no room."
Lao Tzu

"Eternity forever!"

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Old 09-08-2007, 10:36 AM   #184
David Orange
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Re: AIkibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Graham Wild wrote: View Post
Yoshi said a similar thing to me, but he said that they weren't separate any more, not that it wasn't Aikido.
Right. I was reading in "Conversations with Aikjujutsu Masters" that some leading aikido people understood "aikido" to refer to daito ryu aikijujutsu and that some daito ryu people called their art aikido. And it is true that Minoru Hirai, creator of korindo aikido, was the one who actually created the name and registered it with the butokuden. It was actually intended to be a fairly broad category, including his approach, Ueshiba's and that of daito ryu, as well as any other art using aiki.

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Some of the original students in the US describe a very Aikido art. These are the people who stopped training when Auge Sensei got there, because they did not like this approach (this information is from David on eBudo, so he should comment further).
It think that's reflective of the "brand-namization" of aikido after O-Sensei's death. What was a fairly inclusive term became more and more strictly applicable to the aikikai, and even more so when Tohei left. Stanley Pranin has done us a great service to show that the roots are still connected and we do well to understand how broad aikido really is. The people who left when Auge was getting established were those who would have liked to push that old yoseikan aikido much further toward the aikikai brand. Of course, one fellow was rather older and Auge's influence was making the art more demanding. Eventually, I think, Auge did succeed in developing the all-round, smooth art that Mochizuki Sensei was aiming for, combining aikido, judo, karate and sword in a seamless blend of smooth and "very soft" aikido. That is to say that it's hard to feel his technique because it is so soft and smooth, similar to that of Murai Sensei.

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Graham Wild wrote: View Post
I have Mochizuki's French book from the 50's (one just sold on eBay for 400 euros) and it is very much Aikido. This book is very similar to what Sensei Hans teaches us, and he says he teaches us what Yoshi taught him.
And I'm sure it is very much what was being taught in the US before Patrick Auge. I was fortunate to get a pretty good exposure to that art from 1974 to 1976. It was a very interesting art with a fairly limited technical reperoire, not very different from mainstream aikido. This reflects Mochizuki Sensei's approach to aikido up until the mid-1960s or so, when Sadayuki Demizu (Sensei's son-in-law) taught military personnel at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama.

In Japan, Mochizuki Sensei was thinking about sutemi waza. He was feeling bad about his old teacher in gyokushin ryu jujutsu. He met that old Shinto priest when he was about 18 and was training in Toku Sampo's judo dojo. The old man called to him and his friends when they were on the way to training and said he could tell they were judo players. He offered to teach them his ryu and they started, but most of them quickly dropped out because it was all kata and very boring and they wanted to do judo shiai. But Mochizuki stayed long enough to get shodan or nidan level and then left. He said he used to go and the priest would give him the offerings from the Shinto altar for him to eat. He said he would eat the cakes and things and "run away." The old man wanted him to train further and told him, "Beyond this level (first scroll), gyokushin ryu has a lot of sutemi waza." Sensei knew a lot about that already, having been uchi deshi to Kyuzo Mifune, and apparently he didn't put too much value in it. In any case, he quit going and the old man passed away. This was before he met Morihei Ueshiba. When he did meet Ueshiba, he was able to learn fast because he said many of the techniques were similar to gyokushin and he could recognize them faster than those with judo experience because those techniques (such as kote gaeshi) were not included in judo. So he was able to catch on quickly to what Ueshiba was doing.

In the 1950s, in France, he met some pro wrestlers and admired their sacrifice techniques. He realized that the sacrifice most fully expressed Kano's idea of "maximum efficient use of energy." And it was about that time that he started regretting that he had missed the opportunity to learn the sutemi waza of the gyokushin ryu. He said he never even saw the techniques, though I think he did see some drawings on a scroll that the master showed him.

He had become more appreciative of the cultural value of the broad budo education that Kano Jigoro had given him and he realized that he had allowed an entire art to disappear in history. In about the mid-60s, this was bothering him enough that he decided to try to reconstruct the gyokushin ryu and he started surmising on how the sutemi waza would have related to the hand techniques he had learned. He produced a thin little book documenting about ten of his sutemi waza sometime around the late sixties or early seventies, which is about when Patrick Auge went to train at the dojo.

In those days, Mochizuki Sensei had the black belts experimenting with various approaches to sutemi waza with all kinds of judo and aikido/jujutsu techniques. For instance, he developed a kote gaeshi sutemi waza in which you apply kote gaeshi (one of the most dreadful techniques in aikido) by dropping to the ground, making it probably ten times as awful a technique (in terms of uke). He had variations of kata guruma as sutemi--maybe four or five major variations of that. He developed all these techniques rationally, then had Auge, Washizu, Tezuka and Kenmotsu be the main test-nage and test-uke. They were difficult to perform and very difficult to fall for. Eventually, they smoothed out and refined those techniques and all became real masters of that method. And that would include some not named, such as Akahori Sensei and Murai Sensei, "little" Mochizuki and several others. But Auge, Washizu, Tezuka and Kenmotsu were a special group among those. And that is why I say that Patrick was able to establish the art that Mochizuki Sensei was aiming for: it was a work in progress at a time when Mochizuki was around his peak, Patrick was an excellent age and with the ability and time to learn, and he stuck very closely to what Sensei was teaching. Since then, he has methodically lead his large group of students--including abou twenty that have been with him for over twenty years, I believe--in that Shizuoka aikido of the mid-1970s.

Patrick Auge came to the US in 1976. Ten or twelve people, I think, were still doing aikido from the line Demizu had taught at Redstone. Glenn Pack was teaching at the University of Alabama and I had been training there for several months. I had had a good exposure to the general aikido art that Demizu had taught but we followed Auge for several years and he taught us the kind of art Mochizuki Sensei was developing at the hombu. So that was what I trained in until I went to Japan in 1990 and found that what I was doing fit well at the dojo. By that time, the composite art of judo, aikido, karate, sword and sutemi waza had become a very smooth, clear and unique style and it was very recognizable.

I am glad I was not involved in the later politics.

Best to you.

David

"That which has no substance can enter where there is no room."
Lao Tzu

"Eternity forever!"

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Old 09-08-2007, 10:38 AM   #185
David Orange
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Re: Why is there so much confusion about Aikido.

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Salim Shaw wrote: View Post
Don't some judoka refer to the kata guruma as a judo move?
As others have pointed out by now, it is actually not kata guruma but ganseki otoshi, from daito ryu. And that is just to say that the aikido repertoire is pretty broad, depending where you look. The best, I think, is to look to the best and ignore the rest. Have positive ki and don't worry about the negative.

Best to you.

David

"That which has no substance can enter where there is no room."
Lao Tzu

"Eternity forever!"

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Old 09-08-2007, 12:34 PM   #186
wildaikido
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

David,

I love reading your posts. It always makes want to learn more. I think it is great.

A lot of people don't know the origin of the term "AIKIDO" The aikikai people here talk about how O'Sensei came up with the word aikido to describe his art, the way of love. The truth is back when Kancho was learning from him, it was budo, it had lots of names, but the important under pinning idea was budo. Then yes, this umbrella term Aikido was suggested by Hirai. This is why so many people think that his art, Korindo Aikido, is a style of Aikido, but it is a separate Aikido art.

I assume the use of the term Budo had a big influence on Kancho, hence the name change to Yoseikan Budo.

This is why I like to maintain the term Aikido, because when O'Sensei used the term Aikido, he was referring to his budo. Kano also said that Aikido was his ideal budo. So to me Aikido represents true budo. Hence the reason I use the term. Aikido wa Budo desu. Aikido is Budo!

When I visited Auge Sensei, he I showed him some of the basics we do that I did not see him doing. He said that they were old exercises they didn't do anymore. One of these is in the book I mentioned (My Method of Aikido Jujutsu). We basically do all of the techniques in this book, in the same way they are shown.

If you are not aware, the basic kata guruma sutemi actually comes from Mifune Sensei. This is the kneeling kata guruma, but you sacrifice onto your side throwing them over yourself.

The ganseki otoshi is a horrible technique to fall from. We have different ganseki otoshi in Yoseikan Aikido at my school. It is a shoulder throw with boths arms barred across the throwing shoulder. So it is like gyaku seoi and seoi nage together. Have you ever done this throw?

Regards,

Graham Wild
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Old 09-08-2007, 12:46 PM   #187
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Graham Wild wrote: View Post
David,

I love reading your posts. It always makes want to learn more. I think it is great.

A lot of people don't know the origin of the term "AIKIDO" The aikikai people here talk about how O'Sensei came up with the word aikido to describe his art, the way of love. The truth is back when Kancho was learning from him, it was budo, it had lots of names, but the important under pinning idea was budo. Then yes, this umbrella term Aikido was suggested by Hirai. This is why so many people think that his art, Korindo Aikido, is a style of Aikido, but it is a separate Aikido art.

I assume the use of the term Budo had a big influence on Kancho, hence the name change to Yoseikan Budo.

This is why I like to maintain the term Aikido, because when O'Sensei used the term Aikido, he was referring to his budo. Kano also said that Aikido was his ideal budo. So to me Aikido represents true budo. Hence the reason I use the term. Aikido wa Budo desu. Aikido is Budo!

When I visited Auge Sensei, he I showed him some of the basics we do that I did not see him doing. He said that they were old exercises they didn't do anymore. One of these is in the book I mentioned (My Method of Aikido Jujutsu). We basically do all of the techniques in this book, in the same way they are shown.

If you are not aware, the basic kata guruma sutemi actually comes from Mifune Sensei. This is the kneeling kata guruma, but you sacrifice onto your side throwing them over yourself.

The ganseki otoshi is a horrible technique to fall from. We have different ganseki otoshi in Yoseikan Aikido at my school. It is a shoulder throw with boths arms barred across the throwing shoulder. So it is like gyaku seoi and seoi nage together. Have you ever done this throw?

Regards,
I'm glad David and Graham see the importance of BUDO and the realities of Aikikai. This the only thing that I have been trying to point out. It makes me want to learn more also.
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Old 09-10-2007, 07:02 AM   #188
Basia Halliop
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Well, I'm in the Aikikai and I've never heard it referred to as 'the way of love' anywhere but on the internet. So far just about nothing you guys have said about the Aikikai has corresponded with my personal experience. This leads me to think maybe you should just focus on the kind of Aikido you know about and enjoy and what you enjoy about it and stop worrying so much about organizations that you don't know as much about, or using the name of an organization as a vague symbol of all that you don't like in the Aikido world.

You like what you do, don't you? So celebrate it.
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Old 09-10-2007, 09:43 AM   #189
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

I think Yosh taught hombu aikido when he came to Perth which explains the similarities to whats in your book. However, after he started his own dojo he developed his own style. For example, you know the Happoken we do is quite different to the Seifukai and the YWF. Yoshi added two rear and front groing kicks to finish off the kata simulating a rear bear hug defense and a front choke defense. He also included more pressure point techniques into the throws such as digging your middle finger under uke's ear lobe in kubi otoshi and mukae doashi. His version of shihonage is similar to Yoshinkan where on the secong movement you raise uke's elbow to a gyaku tenbin position applying pressure and protecting your face.

I think the major difference compared to what I saw in Shizuoka was the sharp movements of the hips in the throws. They argue that aikido should be one speed however Yoshi said that against a larger opponent you need to use short sharp movements to inflict greater pain.
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Old 09-10-2007, 10:06 AM   #190
darin
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
Well, I'm in the Aikikai and I've never heard it referred to as 'the way of love' anywhere but on the internet. So far just about nothing you guys have said about the Aikikai has corresponded with my personal experience. This leads me to think maybe you should just focus on the kind of Aikido you know about and enjoy and what you enjoy about it and stop worrying so much about organizations that you don't know as much about, or using the name of an organization as a vague symbol of all that you don't like in the Aikido world.

You like what you do, don't you? So celebrate it.
Well said. I think even more important than martial effectiveness is the way aikido can change people's lives. If you ask most Japanese martial artists why they train they will answer "Seishin no tameni" which means to better myself spiritually and mentally. I know it helps me in my life and through it I have made some good friends along the way.
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Old 09-10-2007, 10:38 AM   #191
Basia Halliop
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

I'm not sure I really agree with that. If I try to find something spiritual or life-changing about my study of Aikido, I suppose I can, but only in the same sense that there is some kind of spiritual growth in most things that you work for, i.e., getting a degree, climbing a cliff, learning something you didn't know before, getting in shape when you weren't previously, etc.

My point was rather that I didn't actually see for myself any of what Salim was suggesting was 'the Aikikai' (lots of talk of peace and harmony and sprituality, a suggestion that physical effectiveness was less important). Maybe I just know different people though.

Last edited by Basia Halliop : 09-10-2007 at 10:42 AM.
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Old 09-10-2007, 11:37 AM   #192
lezard39
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Graham Wild wrote: View Post

When I visited Auge Sensei, he I showed him some of the basics we do that I did not see him doing. He said that they were old exercises they didn't do anymore. One of these is in the book I mentioned (My Method of Aikido Jujutsu). We basically do all of the techniques in this book, in the same way they are shown.
Graham, are you referring to kata or the te waza in the book, if you talking about te waza, I can say that we are still doing these techniques in Augé Sensei group; Kote Gaeshi, Shiho Nage, Yuki Chigaï, Tenbin Nage and Hatchi Mawashi. But we do not do these exactly the same as it's showed in the book, like Kencho Sensei, Augé is trying to improve what he learned, so there's always modification in the way of doing techniques. This book was writing in the end of 50's so I'm pretty sure that even Minoru Mochizuki was not doing this Te waza exactly the same way. Augé Sensei put a lot of focus on kenkyo. In the clinics, he want's us to do research and after that we demonstrate what we found. He don't want us to be "little robot" and do Budo without thinking. It's in progress all the time and always with the goal of doing more effective technique. By the way, I wanna say thanks you for the post about Yoseikan in Wiki, great job!

Regards

Olivier
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Old 09-10-2007, 11:56 AM   #193
lezard39
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Re: AIkibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

David,

It's always a pleasure to read your story about Yoseikan Hombu. VERRY INTERESTING! When are you gonna wrote a book about that??!

Olivier
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Old 09-10-2007, 07:25 PM   #194
darin
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
I'm not sure I really agree with that. If I try to find something spiritual or life-changing about my study of Aikido, I suppose I can, but only in the same sense that there is some kind of spiritual growth in most things that you work for, i.e., getting a degree, climbing a cliff, learning something you didn't know before, getting in shape when you weren't previously, etc.

My point was rather that I didn't actually see for myself any of what Salim was suggesting was 'the Aikikai' (lots of talk of peace and harmony and sprituality, a suggestion that physical effectiveness was less important). Maybe I just know different people though.
I fully understood your point Basia. This thrread seems to be Yoseikan/aikibudo vs the rest. Aikikai does have a lot of fine aikidoists and just like Yoseikan, Yoshinkan and Tomiki aikido you find all levels of training intensity. Main thing is people enjoy what they are doing and they stick with it.

Anyway I don't think self defense alone is what keeps people coming back to training regardless of what martial arts they are doing.
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Old 09-11-2007, 06:27 AM   #195
wildaikido
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Re: AIkibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Quote:
Olivier Desrochers wrote: View Post
David,

It's always a pleasure to read your story about Yoseikan Hombu. VERRY INTERESTING! When are you gonna wrote a book about that??!

Olivier
I would buy it!

I wish I had more sources then just Aikido journal for what Mochizuki Kancho had to teach all of us

Graham Wild
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Old 09-11-2007, 06:42 AM   #196
wildaikido
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Olivier Desrochers wrote: View Post
Graham, are you referring to kata or the te waza in the book, if you talking about te waza, I can say that we are still doing these techniques in Augé Sensei group; Kote Gaeshi, Shiho Nage, Yuki Chigaï, Tenbin Nage and Hatchi Mawashi. But we do not do these exactly the same as it's showed in the book, like Kencho Sensei, Augé is trying to improve what he learned, so there's always modification in the way of doing techniques. This book was writing in the end of 50's so I'm pretty sure that even Minoru Mochizuki was not doing this Te waza exactly the same way. Augé Sensei put a lot of focus on kenkyo. In the clinics, he want's us to do research and after that we demonstrate what we found. He don't want us to be "little robot" and do Budo without thinking. It's in progress all the time and always with the goal of doing more effective technique.
I am actually referring to the exercise in the beginning of the book. It is the punch and block exercise. Like I said Auge Sensei told me that they don't do them any more. After my experience with Auge Sensei, I have taken exercises like this and modified them, and made new ones. We even do the happoken and sambo giri the way they are show in that book.

My teacher still teaches us the te waza that are in this book, not that he has this book, I found it by accident while trying to find Nihon Den Jujutsu. I was shocked to see what we do in a book, exercises and all. During randori in LA, these techniques would work. Especially the short method of applying kote gaeshi from a dosoku katate dore (gyaku gamae katate dori for those of you who do not do Yoseikan), this worked nicely, even with the senior students.

Basically Auge Sensei freed me from "kata" (fixed ways of doing techniques), and gave me the term I love, KENKYU! I hope one day he will understand how much I appreciate what he has done for me.

Quote:
Olivier Desrochers wrote: View Post
By the way, I wanna say thanks you for the post about Yoseikan in Wiki, great job!
Yoseikan Aikido is my passion. Hence, I added the article. It may have gotten out of control, but I couldn't resist.

Regards,

Graham Wild
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Old 09-11-2007, 06:45 AM   #197
wildaikido
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Darin Hyde wrote: View Post
I think the major difference compared to what I saw in Shizuoka was the sharp movements of the hips in the throws. They argue that aikido should be one speed however Yoshi said that against a larger opponent you need to use short sharp movements to inflict greater pain.
Who used there hips more, Yoshi, or those in Shizuoka?

Basically I learn't how to use my hips properly from Auge Sensei in LA. This was just from all the kihon. They completely changed the way I do all my techniques.

Regards,

Graham Wild
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Old 09-11-2007, 07:24 AM   #198
darin
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

I'd say Yoshi uses more hip movement than those in Shizuoka but then again they may be toning it down to decrease injuries. The YWF use a different kind of hip movement based on wave motion.
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Old 09-11-2007, 07:36 AM   #199
wildaikido
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

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Darin Hyde wrote: View Post
I'd say Yoshi uses more hip movement than those in Shizuoka but then again they may be toning it down to decrease injuries. The YWF use a different kind of hip movement based on wave motion.
I would say that Auge sensei showed me (not personally, or directly) how to use the hip snap from Shotokan in my Aikido. This changed the way I did my techniques. I developed devastating power in my Yuki Chigai, which I expanded to improve my Shiho Nage. The same thing happened with my Robuse, Kote Gaeshi, etc.

Regards,

Graham Wild
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Old 09-11-2007, 11:54 PM   #200
darin
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Re: Aikibudo/Yoseikan Techniques

Yeah thats pretty much how Yosh did it. The other thing is to always keep uke off balance by maintaining tension/pain. Its an area people become lazy with. I don't do it so much now because it can cause serious injuries. Some of Yoshi's old students still have bad wrists and elbows.
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