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Old 05-17-2007, 06:45 PM   #1
yosushi
Dojo: Aoyama dojo
Location: Tokyo
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14
France
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Smile Reanimation techniques

Hi -

Is there reanimation techniques taught in aikido dojos ?
To help a student who has fainted, or who is nose-bleeding,
or put back a shoulder, ... ? Is that part of advanced kiatsu classes ?
I`m not speaking of first aid training that some teachers have to take in some countries, to be a teacher (France for example ),
I`m speaking of aikido-related or martial art-related techniques.

In ki aikido school, I have seen senior sensei with 40+ years of experience do some reanimations.

Is that systematically taught, as a kiatsu or teacher class maybe, in your dojos ?
I can imagine this would be helpful to teachers.
I have received kiatsu from some of my teachers to relieve pain and it helped every time.

Best regards
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Old 05-17-2007, 06:50 PM   #2
Haowen Chan
Location: Pittsburgh
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 91
United_States
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Re: Reanimation techniques

You mean in 40 years I can be just like this guy? Awesome! Finally, the secret of aikido is out!


Last edited by Haowen Chan : 05-17-2007 at 06:52 PM.
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Old 05-17-2007, 07:35 PM   #3
Laurel Seacord
Dojo: Seishinkan (Ki no Kenkyukai), Tokyo, Japan
Location: Tokyo
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 24
Japan
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Re: Reanimation techniques

The resuscitation techniques are called "kappou" in Japanese. Our teacher has mentioned that he learned these techniques, but I have never seen him teach them to anyone in the regular classes. Maybe this is taught to instructors? One kappou technique is described in Tohei-sensei's book "Kiatsu" (page 62).

Kappou are from the judo tradition to help people recover from choke holds. Here is a link with a little more information: http://www.fightingarts.com/reading/article.php?id=144
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Old 05-17-2007, 09:59 PM   #4
bkedelen
 
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Dojo: Boulder Aikikai
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Re: Reanimation techniques

Ikeda sensei has a few such techniques that he says are an Ikeda family tradition. The one I remember specifically is his nosebleed abatement technique.
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Old 05-17-2007, 10:51 PM   #5
Chuck Clark
 
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Dojo: Jiyushinkan
Location: Monroe, Washington
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Re: Reanimation techniques

Cayenne pepper on your finger up the nose works great for nosebleeds. Seriously...

Chuck Clark
Jiyushinkai Aikibudo
www.jiyushinkai.org
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Old 05-21-2007, 07:53 PM   #6
Murgen
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 34
United_States
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Re: Reanimation techniques

Yes, I've had kiatsu done on me after a bad injury by my sensei. I've even had it applied to my collar bone when it broke. I didn't realize it was broken at the time or I wouldn't have allowed kiatsu to be done on it. I think it depends on where the fracture occurs as to how painful it is so I can't say for sure it was the kiatsu that helped or not. I was at home taking a shower without any pain, when I realized......the collar bone should not be moving like that. Turns out it was a complete fracture when they did the X-rays in the ER. Go figure. The doctor was looking at me like I was a freak of nature.

At the end of our all male class we used to do kiatsu massage for 15 minutes. I think we stopped doing that because we got some single women and a teenage girl who joined the class and sensei didn't want them to feel uncomfortable. Almost positive that is why we stopped it. I miss it. Seemed to really help.
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Old 05-22-2007, 05:29 AM   #7
SeiserL
 
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Dojo: Roswell Budokan, Kyushinkan Dojo, Aikido World Alliance
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Re: Reanimation techniques

Quote:
Chuck Clark wrote: View Post
Cayenne pepper on your finger up the nose works great for nosebleeds. Seriously...
OUCH OUCH OUCH
SNEEZE SNEEZE SNEEZE
It would reanimate me for sure, in running away.
WOW

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 05-22-2007, 10:29 AM   #8
tedehara
 
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Dojo: Evanston Ki-Aikido
Location: Evanston IL
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 826
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Re: Reanimation techniques

Quote:
Lionel Moulas wrote: View Post
Hi -

...In ki aikido school, I have seen senior sensei with 40+ years of experience do some reanimations.

Is that systematically taught, as a kiatsu or teacher class maybe, in your dojos ?
I can imagine this would be helpful to teachers.
I have received kiatsu from some of my teachers to relieve pain and it helped every time.

Best regards
Kiatsu is a discipline of ki development. If you really want to understand it, there are certified courses that takes several years to complete. Sometimes kiatsu is introduced along with other ways of ki development in Ki Society dojos.

It's not unusual for martial artists to know the healing aspect of the human body. Advanced judo students learn how to revive a person after learning how to choke them out. Traditionally martial artists have been the village bone setters.

Now treating dislocations are done by surgeons. Today if you were to do bone setting, you could be sued for practicing medicine without a license.

It is not practice that makes perfect, it is correct practice that makes perfect.
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